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  1. C. Clare Hinrichs (forthcoming). Transitions to Sustainability: A Change in Thinking About Food Systems Change? Agriculture and Human Values.
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  2. Jessica M. Bagdonis, C. Clare Hinrichs & Kai A. Schafft (2009). The Emergence and Framing of Farm-to-School Initiatives: Civic Engagement, Health and Local Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):107-119.
    Interest in and initiation of farm-to-school (FTS) programs have increased in recent years, spurred on by converging public concerns about child obesity trends and risks associated with industrialization and distancing in the modern food system. A civic agriculture framework that more specifically considers civic engagement and problem solving offers insights about variations in the development and prospects for FTS programs. Drawing on comparative case studies of two emerging FTS initiatives in Pennsylvania—one in a rural setting and one in an urban (...)
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  3. C. Clare Hinrichs (2008). Interdisciplinarity and Boundary Work: Challenges and Opportunities for Agrifood Studies. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):209-213.
    Despite its vigor, agrifood studies research faces two fault lines: the durability of disciplines, and challenges in engaging non-academic stakeholders. In this essay, I use the concept of boundary work from social studies of science and technology to reflect on the challenges and opportunities for more engaged interdisciplinary research in agrifood studies. I draw on recent field visits to several “sustainable food chain” research projects funded through the Rural Economy and Land Use Programme (RELU), an innovative interdisciplinary research initiative of (...)
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  4. C. Clare Hinrichs & Patricia Allen (2008). Selective Patronage and Social Justice: Local Food Consumer Campaigns in Historical Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):329-352.
    In the early 2000s, the development of local food systems in advanced industrial countries has expanded beyond creation and support of farmers’ markets and community supported agriculture farms and projects to include targeted Buy Local Food campaigns. Non-governmental groups in many U.S. places and regions have launched such campaigns with the intent of motivating and directing consumers toward more local food purchasing in general. This article examines the current manifestations and possibilities for social justice concerns in Buy Local Food campaigns, (...)
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  5. C. Clare Hinrichs & Rick Welsh (2003). The Effects of the Industrialization of US Livestock Agriculture on Promoting Sustainable Production Practices. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):125-141.
    US livestock agriculture hasdeveloped and intensified according to a strictproductionist model that emphasizes industrialefficiency. Sustainability problems associatedwith this model have become increasinglyevident and more contested. Traditionalapproaches to promoting sustainable agriculturehave emphasized education and outreach toencourage on-farm adoption of alternativeproduction systems. Such efforts build on anunderlying assumption that farmers areempowered to make decisions regarding theorganization and management of theiroperations. However, as vertical coordinationin agriculture continues, especially in theanimal agriculture sectors, this assumptionbecomes less valid. This paper examines how thechanging industrial structure in (...)
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  6. C. Clare Hinrichs (1995). Off the Treadmill? Technology and Tourism in the North American Maple Syrup Industry. Agriculture and Human Values 12 (1):39-47.
    The contrast between the nostalgic pictures on maple syrup packaging and sophisticated technologies actually used in the sugarbush and sugarhouse suggests disjunctures between image and practice in the contemporary North American maple syrup industry. This paper argues that although evidence of a “technological treadmill” exists within the maple syrup industry, as it does in other rural production sectors, such a trend is incomplete due to the increasing importance of consumption-based activities and concerns in the countryside. In response to the interests (...)
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