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  1. C. Fred Alford (forthcoming). Jürgen Habermas and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: What Is Theoretically Fruitful Knowledge? Social Research.
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  2. C. Fred Alford (2012). Jean Améry: Resentment as Ethic and Ontology. [REVIEW] Topoi 31 (2):229-240.
    Against the view that trauma cripples the survivor’s ability to account for his or her own experience, Jean Améry, a survivor of Auschwitz, argued that trauma speaks a language of its own. In this language, what may be taken as a clinical symptom, the inability to let go of a traumatic past, is actually an ethical stance on behalf of history’s victims. Améry wrote about aging in similar terms. Aging and death are an assault on the values of life, an (...)
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  3. C. Fred Alford (2010). Narrative, Nature, and the Natural Law: From Aquinas to International Human Rights. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction -- Saint Thomas : putting nature into natural law -- Maritain and the love for the natural law -- The new natural law and evolutionary natural law -- International human rights, natural law, and Locke -- Conclusion : evil and the limits of the natural law.
     
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  4. C. Fred Alford (2007). Whistle-Blower Narratives: The Experience of Choiceless Choice. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):223-248.
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  5. C. Fred Alford (2005). Freedom of the Encumbered Self: Michael Sandel and Iris Murdoch. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):109.
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  6. C. Fred Alford (2004). Levinas and Political Theory. Political Theory 32 (2):146-171.
    How best to avoid the Levinas Effect, as it has been called, the tendency to make Emmanuel Levinas everything to everyone? One way is to demonstrate that Levinas's thinking does not fit into any of the categories by which we ordinarily approach political theory. If one were forced to categorize Levinas's political theory, the term "inverted liberalism " would come closest to the mark. As long, that is, as one emphasizes the term "inverted" over "liberalism." Levinas's defense of liberalism is (...)
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  7. C. Fred Alford (2003). Women as Whistleblowers. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 22 (1):67-76.
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  8. C. Fred Alford (2002). Emmanuel Levinas and Iris Murdoch: Ethics as Exit? Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):24-42.
  9. C. Fred Alford (2002). Levinas, the Frankfurt School, and Psychoanalysis. Wesleyan University Press.
    'Original and provocative . . . engagingly written. (C Fred Alford) counters Levinas's notorious obscurity with a goodly dose of transparency' - John Lechte, Macquarrie University Abstract and evocative, writing in what can only be ...
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  10. C. Fred Alford (2002). The Opposite of Totality: Levinas and the Frankfurt School. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 31 (2):229-254.
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  11. C. Fred Alford (2001). Whistleblowers and the Narrative of Ethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):402–418.
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  12. C. Fred Alford (2000). What Would It Matter If Everything Foucault Said About Prison Were Wrong? Discipline and Punish After Twenty Years. Theory and Society 29 (1):125-146.
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  13. C. Fred Alford (1997). Hitler's Willing Executioners: What Does “Willing” Mean? [REVIEW] Theory and Society 26 (5):719-738.
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  14. C. Fred Alford (1997). What Evil Means to Us. Cornell University Press.
    C. Fred Alford interviewed working people, prisoners, and college students in order to discover how people experience evil -- in themselves, in others, and in ...
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  15. C. Fred Alford (1992). Responsibility Without Freedom. Theory and Society 21 (2):157-181.
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  16. C. Fred Alford (1987). Eros and Civilization After Thirty Years. Theory and Society 16 (6):869-890.
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  17. C. Fred Alford (1987). Hans Albert and the Unfinished Enlightenment. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 17 (4):453-469.
  18. C. Fred Alford (1985). Is Jürgen Habermas's Reconstructive Science Really Science? Theory and Society 14 (3):321-340.
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  19. C. Fred Alford (1985). III. Yates on Feyerabend's Democratic Relativism. Inquiry 28 (1-4):113 – 118.
    Stephen Yates's objections to Feyerabend's political theory (Inquiry 27 [1984], 137?42) are presented in a way that makes them unnecessarily vulnerable to a rhetorical strategy often employed by Feyerabend. Like many other critics, Yates seems to assume that it is the implausibility of Feyerabend's claims that opens them to refutation, whereas it is really this that makes them such slippery targets of criticism. Rather than claim that Feyerabend's ideal would be virtually impossible to realize, I argue that Feyerabend does not (...)
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