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  1. R. G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin (forthcoming). Color Matching and Color Naming: A Response to Roberts and Schmidtke. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-7.
    In their article ‘In defense of incompatibility, objectivism, and veridicality about color’ P. Roberts and K. Schmidtke offer the results of an experiment supposed to show that if selection of colored samples representing unique hues for subjects (naming) has a greater inter-subject variability than identification of sample pairs with no perceptual difference between them (matching) the result provides support for the philosophical concept of color realism. On examining the results in detail, we find that, according to standard statistical methodology, the (...)
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  2. Rolf G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin (2010). Churchland's Metamers. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):81-92.
    Paul Churchland proposed a conceptual framework for translating reflectance profiles into a space he takes to be the color qualia space. It allows him to determine color metamers of spectral surface reflectances without reference to the characteristics of visual systems, claiming that the reflectance classes that it specifies correspond to visually determined metamers. We advance several objections to his method, show that a significant number of reflectance profiles are not placed into the space in agreement with the qualia solid, and (...)
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  3. C. L. Hardin (2008). 7 Color Qualities and the Physical World. In Edmond Wright (ed.), The Case for Qualia. The Mit Press. 143.
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  4. Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin (2007). The Truth About 'the Truth About True Blue'. Analysis 67 (294):162–166.
    It can happen that a single surface S, viewed in normal conditions, looks pure blue (“true blue”) to observer John but looks blue tinged with green to a second observer, Jane, even though both are normal in the sense that they pass the standard psychophysical tests for color vision. Tye (2006a) finds this situation prima facie puzzling, and then offers two different “solutions” to the puzzle.1 The first is that at least one observer misrepresents S’s color because, though normal in (...)
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  5. C. L. Hardin (2007). Review of Robert Schwartz, Visual Versions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).
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  6. Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin (2006). True Colours. Analysis 66 (292):335-340.
    (Tye 2006) presents us with the following scenario: John and Jane are both stan- dard human visual perceivers (according to the Ishihara test or the Farnsworth test, for example) viewing the same surface of Munsell chip 527 in standard conditions of visual observation. The surface of the chip looks “true blue” to John (i.e., it looks blue not tinged with any other colour to John), and blue tinged with green to Jane.1 Tye then in effect poses a multiple choice question.
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  7. C. L. Hardin (2006). Theodore C. Denise, 1919-2005. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 79 (5):119 -.
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  8. C. L. Hardin & W. J. Hardin (2006). A Tale of Hoffman. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):46-47.
  9. C. L. Hardin (2004). A Green Thought in a Green Shade. Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):29-39.
  10. C. L. Hardin (2003). A Spectral Reflectance Doth Not a Color Make. Journal of Philosophy 100 (4):191-202.
  11. C. L. Hardin (2003). Byrne and Hilbert's Chromatic Ether. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):32-33.
    Because our only access to color qualities is through their appearance, Byrne & Hilbert's insistence on a strict distinction between apparent colors and real colors leaves them without a principled way of determining when, if ever, we see colors as they really are.
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  12. C. L. Hardin (2000). Red and Yellow, Green and Blue, Warm and Cool: Explaining Color Appearance. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):113-122.
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  13. C. L. Hardin (1999). Color Quality and Structure. In S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak & David Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii: The Third Tucson Discussions and Debates. Mit Press.
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  14. C. L. Hardin (1999). Color Relations and the Power of Complexity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):953-954.
    Color-order systems highlight certain features of color phenomenology while neglecting others. It is misleading to speak as if there were a single “psychological color space” that might be described by a rather simple formal structure. Criticisms of functionalism based on multiple realizations of a too-simple formal description of chromatic pheno-menal relations thus miss the mark. It is quite implausible that a functional system representing the full complexity of human color phenomenology should be realizable by radically different (...)
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  15. C. L. Hardin (1997). Color-Order Systems: A Guide for the Perplexed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):190-191.
    If, as Saunders & van Brakel assert, hue, lightness, and saturation characterize artificial color spaces and not the colors of everyday life, one would expect those color spaces to have limited relevance to our understanding of color phenomena and to be of little practical application. This is not the case. Although people perceive these and equivalent color dimensions holistically rather than analytically, they are able to use such triples to categorize the colors of their environment.
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  16. C. L. Hardin (1997). Reinverting the Spectrum. In Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert (eds.), Readings on Color, Volume 1: The Philosophy of Color. Mit Press. 5--99.
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  17. C. L. Hardin (1996). Review. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):339-343.
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  18. C. L. Hardin (1996). Sensory Qualities. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):244-246.
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  19. C. L. Hardin (1995). Introduction. Teaching Philosophy 18 (4):327-331.
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  20. C. L. Hardin (1993). Color Subjectivism. In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: Mit Press.
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  21. C. L. Hardin (1993). Van Brakel and the Not-so-Naked Emperor. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (1):137-50.
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  22. C. L. Hardin (1992). Color for Pigeons and Philosophers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):37-38.
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  23. C. L. Hardin (1992). Physiology, Phenomenology, and Spinoza's True Colors. In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter.
  24. C. L. Hardin (1992). The Virtues of Illusion. Philosophical Studies 68 (3):371--382.
    What ecological advantages do animals gain by being able to detect, extract and exploit wavelength information? What are the advantages of representing that information as hue qualities? The benefits of adding chromatic to achromatic vision, marginal in object detection, become apparent in object recognition and receiving biological signals. It is argued that this improved performance is a direct consequence of the fact that many animals' visual systems reduce wavelength information to combinations of four basic hues. This engenders a simple categorical (...)
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  25. C. L. Hardin (1991). Color for Philosophers: A Précis. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):19-26.
  26. C. L. Hardin (1991). Reply to Levine's 'Cool Red'. Philosophical Psychology 4:41-50.
     
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  27. C. L. Hardin (1991). Reply to Levine. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):41-50.
  28. C. L. Hardin (1991). Reply to Teller's Simpler Arguments Might Work Better. Philosophical Psychology 4:61-64.
     
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  29. C. L. Hardin (1991). Reply to Teller. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):61-64.
  30. C. L. Hardin (1991). Reply to Wilson. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):79-81.
  31. C. L. Hardin (1990). Color and Illusion. In William G. Lycan (ed.), Mind and Cognition. Blackwell.
     
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  32. C. L. Hardin (1989). Could White Be Green? Mind 98 (390):285-8.
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  33. C. L. Hardin (1989). David Hilbert, Color and Color Perception: A Study in Anthropocentric Realism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 9 (2):47-49.
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  34. C. L. Hardin (1989). Idle Colors and Busy Spectra. Analysis 49 (January):47-8.
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  35. C. L. Hardin (1989). The Bicameral Retina at a Glance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):405.
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  36. C. L. Hardin (1988). Color for Philosophers. Hackett.
    This expanded edition of C L Hardin's ground-breaking work on colour features a new chapter, 'Further Thoughts: 1993', in which the author revisits the dispute ...
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  37. C. L. Hardin (1988). Color for Philosophers: Unweaving the Rainbow. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett. 1992 The Virtues of Illusion. Philosophical Studies 67:153-166.
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  38. C. L. Hardin (1988). Phenomenal Colors and Sorites. Noûs 22 (June):213-34.
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  39. C. L. Hardin (1987). Qualia and Materialism: Closing the Explanatory Gap. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (December):281-98.
  40. C. L. Hardin (1985). A Transparent Case for Subjectivism. Analysis 45 (March):117-119.
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  41. C. L. Hardin (1985). Frank Talk About the Colors of Sense-Data. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (December):485-93.
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  42. C. L. Hardin (1985). The Resemblances of Colors. Philosophical Studies 48 (July):35-47.
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  43. C. L. Hardin (1984). Thank Goodness It's Over There! Philosophy 59 (227):121 - 125.
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  44. C. L. Hardin (1984). A New Look at Color. American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (April):125-33.
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  45. C. L. Hardin (1984). Are Scientific Objects Colored? Mind 93 (October):491-500.
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  46. C. L. Hardin (1983). Colors, Normal Observers and Standard Conditions. Journal of Philosophy 80 (December):806-13.
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  47. C. L. Hardin (1977). Spinoza on Immortality and Time. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):129-138.