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Charles W. Mills [54]Catherine Mills [32]Claudia Mills [29]Charles Mills [15]
C. Wright Mills [12]Candice M. Mills [5]Chris Mills [3]C. Mills [3]

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Profile: Catherine Mills (Monash University)
  1.  20
    Charles W. Mills (1999). [Book Review] the Racial Contract. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 25 (1):155-160.
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  2. Charles Mills (2007). White Ignorance. In Shannon Sullivan Nancy Tuana (ed.), Race and Epistemologies of Ignorance. State Univ of New York Pr 11--38.
  3.  87
    Charles W. Mills (1998). Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race. Cornell University Press.
    Charles Mills makes visible in the world of mainstream philosophy some of the crucial issues of the black experience.
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  4. Charles W. Mills (2005). "Ideal Theory" as Ideology. Hypatia 20 (3):165-184.
  5. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  6. C. Wright Mills (2005). The Power Elite. In Christopher Grey & Hugh Willmott (eds.), Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie. OUP Oxford 328-329.
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  7. Claudia Mills (2003). The Child's Right to an Open Future? Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):499–509.
  8.  56
    Catherine Mills (2011). Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics. Springer.
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents to ‘choose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to these challenges by proposing a new framework for thinking about the ethics of reproduction that emphasizes the ways that social norms affect decisions about who is born. The book provides clear and thorough discussions of some of the dominant problems in reproductive ethics - human enhancement and the notion of the normal, reproductive liberty (...)
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  9.  7
    Catherine Mills (2008). The Philosophy of Agamben. Routledge.
    Giorgio Agamben has gained widespread popularity in recent years for his rethinking of radical politics and his approach to metaphysics and language. However, the extraordinary breadth of historical, legal and philosophical sources which contribute to the complexity and depth of Agamben's thinking can also make his work intimidating. Covering the full range of Agamben's work, this critical introduction outlines Agamben's key concerns: metaphysics, language and potentiality, aesthetics and poetics, sovereignty, law and biopolitics, ethics and testimony, and his powerful vision of (...)
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  10.  1
    Angie M. Johnston, Candice M. Mills & Asheley R. Landrum (2015). How Do Children Weigh Competence and Benevolence When Deciding Whom to Trust? Cognition 144:76-90.
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  11.  1
    C. Wright Mills (1960). The Sociological Imagination. British Journal of Educational Studies 9 (1):75-76.
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  12.  28
    Chris Mills (2015). The Heteronomy of Choice Architecture. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (3):495-509.
    Choice architecture is heralded as a policy approach that does not coercively reduce freedom of choice. Still we might worry that this approach fails to respect individual choice because it subversively manipulates individuals, thus contravening their personal autonomy. In this article I address two arguments to this effect. First, I deny that choice architecture is necessarily heteronomous. I explain the reasons we have for avoiding heteronomous policy-making and offer a set of four conditions for non-heteronomy. I then provide examples of (...)
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  13.  13
    Catherine Mills (2013). Reproductive Autonomy as Self-Making: Procreative Liberty and the Practice of Ethical Subjectivity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):639-656.
    In this article, I consider recent debates on the notion of procreative liberty, to argue that reproductive freedom can be understood as a form of positive freedom—that is, the freedom to make oneself according to various ethical and aesthetic principles or values. To make this argument, I draw on Michel Foucault’s later work on ethics. Both adopting and adapting Foucault’s notion of ethics as a practice of the self and of liberty, I argue that reproductive autonomy requires enactment to gain (...)
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  14.  12
    Catherine Mills (2004). Agamben's Messianic Politics. Contretemps 5.
  15.  5
    H. H. Gerth & C. Wright Mills (1946). From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology. Journal of Philosophy 43 (26):722-723.
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  16.  44
    Charles Mills (2005). Kant's Untermenschen. In Andrew Valls (ed.), Race and Racism in Modern Philosophy. Cornell University Press 169--93.
  17.  17
    Catherine Mills (2000). Efficacy and Vulnerability: Judith Butler on Reiteration and Resistance. Australian Feminist Studies 15 (32):265--279.
  18.  39
    Charles W. Mills (2013). Notes From the Resistance: Some Comments on Sally Haslanger's Resisting Reality. Philosophical Studies 171 (1):1-13.
    After a brief summary of the 17 essays in Sally Haslanger ’s collection, Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique, I raise questions in two areas, the defense of constructionism and the definition of gender and race in terms of social oppression. I cite Robin Andreasen’s and Philip Kitcher’s essays arguing that races are both biologically real and socially constructed, and also Joshua Glasgow’s claim that constructionist arguments ultimately fail. I then cite Jennifer Saul’s critique that “ oppression ” definitions (...)
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  19.  16
    Catherine Mills (2007). Normative Violence, Vulnerability, and Responsibility. Differences 18 (2):133--156.
  20.  27
    Chris Mills (2013). The Problem of Paternal Motives. Utilitas 25 (4):446-462.
    In this article I assess the ability of motivational accounts of paternalism to respond to a particular challenge: can its proponents adequately explain the source of the distinctive form of disrespect that animates this view? In particular I examine the recent argument put forward by Jonathan Quong that we can explain the presumptive wrong of paternalism by relying on a Rawlsian account of moral status. I challenge the plausibility of Quong's argument, claiming that although this approach can provide a clear (...)
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  21. Charles W. Mills (1994). Do Black Men Have a Moral Duty to Marry Black Women? Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (s1):131-153.
  22.  64
    Catherine Mills (2010). Continental Philosophy and Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):145-148.
  23.  5
    Charles W. Mills (2005). “Ideal Theory” as Ideology. Hypatia 20 (3):165-183.
  24.  7
    Charles W. Mills (2009). Schwartzman Vs. Okin: Some Comments on "Challenging Liberalism". Hypatia 24 (4):164 - 177.
  25.  30
    Catherine Mills (2003). Contesting the Political: Butler and Foucault on Power and Resistance. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (3):253–272.
  26.  96
    Charles W. Mills (2009). Rawls on Race/Race in Rawls. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):161-184.
  27. Charles W. Mills (2003). ``Heart'' Attack: A Critique of Jorge Garcia's Volitional Conception of Racism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 7 (1):29-62.
    Since its original 1996 publication,Jorge Garcia''s ``The Heart of Racism'''' has beenwidely reprinted, a testimony to its importanceas a distinctive and original analysis ofracism. Garcia shifts the standard framework ofdiscussion from the socio-political to theethical, and analyzes racism as essentially avice. He represents his account asnon-revisionist (capturing everyday usage),non-doxastic (not relying on belief),volitional (requiring ill-will), and moralized(racism is always wrong). In this paper, Icritique Garcia''s analysis, arguing that hedoes in fact revise everyday usage, that hisaccount does tacitly rely on belief, (...)
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  28.  4
    Catherine Mills, Resisting Biopolitics, Resisting Freedom: Prenatal Testing and Choice.
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  29.  91
    Charles W. Mills (1994). Non-Cartesian Sums. Teaching Philosophy 17 (3):223-243.
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  30. Charles W. Mills (2011). Body Politic, Bodies Impolitic. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (2):583-606.
    Starting from Thomas Hobbes's distinctively materialist version of social contract theory, I argue that Hobbes can assist us in theorizing the racialized body politic of the white LEVIATHAN that is the United States. However, we will need to go beyond his own qualified materialism to recognize the social materiality of race, a materiality not to be reduced to, though incorporating, the body.
     
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  31.  2
    Candice M. Mills & Frank C. Keil (2008). Children’s Developing Notions of Partiality. Cognition 107 (2):528-551.
  32.  27
    Charles W. Mills (2014). Kant and Race, Redux. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 35 (1-2):125-157.
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  33.  9
    Charles Mills (2015). Book Review: Neil Roberts, Freedom as Marronage. [REVIEW] Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):145-149.
    A book review of Neil Roberts, Freedom as Marronage.
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  34.  10
    Catherine Mills, Undoing Ethics: Butler on Precarity, Opacity and Responsibility.
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  35.  87
    Charles W. Mills (1988). Alternative Epistemologies. Social Theory and Practice 14 (3):237-263.
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  36. Charles W. Mills (2004). Racial Exploitation and the Wages of Whiteness. In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge
  37.  71
    Claudia Mills (1995). Goodness as Weapon. Journal of Philosophy 92 (9):485-499.
    Most of us spend much of our time trying to get other people to act as we would like them to act, trying to influence them in some way to further our purposes or advance our ends. In this enterprise, we make use of a wide array of motivational levers; we take advantage of various sources of others’ susceptibility to influence. Much of this, I submit, is morally unproblematic. There is no moral reason why we should eschew all attempts at (...)
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  38. Charles W. Mills (2005). "Ideal Theory" as Ideology. Hypatia 20 (3):165-184.
  39.  14
    Catherine Mills (2008). Playing with Law: Agamben and Derrida on Postjuridical Justice. South Atlantic Quarterly 107 (1):15--36.
  40.  44
    Charles W. Mills (2012). Occupy Liberalism! Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):305-323.
    The “Occupy Wall Street!” movement has stimulated a long listing of other candidates for radical “occupation.” In this paper, I suggest the occupation of liberalism itself. I argue for a constructive engagement of radicals with liberalism in order to retrieve it for a radical egalitarian agenda. My premise is that the foundational values of liberalism have a radical potential that has not historically been realized, given the way the dominant varieties of liberalism have developed. Ten reasons standardly given as to (...)
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  41.  10
    Catherine Mills (2010). A Manner of Speaking: Declaration, Critique and the Trope of Interrogation. Law and Critique 21 (3):247--260.
    In this paper I will argue for the ethical and political virtue of a form of critique associated with the work of Michel Foucault. Foucault’s tryptich of essays on critique---namely ”What is Critique?’ ”What is Revolution?’ and ”What is Enlightenment?’---develop a formulation of critique understood as an attitude or disposition, a kind of relation that one bears to oneself and to the actuality of the present. I suggest that this critical attitude goes hand in hand with a mode of intellectual (...)
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  42. Charles W. Mills (2010). Realizing (Through Racializing) Pogge. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Thomas Pogge and His Critics. Polity
     
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  43. Charles W. Mills (2001). White Supremacy and Racial Justice. In James P. Sterba (ed.), Social and Political Philosophy: Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge 321--337.
  44.  19
    Claudia Mills (1998). Choice and Circumstance. Ethics 109 (1):154-165.
    An applicant to our graduate program in philosophy, accepted as well by one (but only one) other graduate program, wrestles with his decision. Finally he decides to attend the other program, but he thanks me for our offer, telling me, "I'm glad that at least I had a choice." I want to focus a bit on these two stories, for while the central conclusion in each -- something turning on the importance of choice -- is initially compelling, it is also, (...)
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  45.  13
    Catherine Mills, Making Fetal Persons: Fetal Homicide, Ultrasound, and the Normative Significance of Birth.
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  46. Hussein M. Adam, Elizabeth Bell, Robert D. Bullard, Robert Melchior Figueroa, Clarice E. Gaylord, Segun Gbadegesin, R. J. A. Goodland, Howard McCurdy, Charles Mills, Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Peter S. Wenz & Daniel C. Wigley (2001). Faces of Environmental Racism: Confronting Issues of Global Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  47.  22
    Claudia Mills (1995). Politics and Manipulation. Social Theory and Practice 21 (1):97-112.
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  48. Catherine Mills (2005). Linguistic Survival and Ethicality: Biopolitics, Subjectivation, and Testimony in Remnants of Auschwitz. In Andrew Norris (ed.), Politics, Metaphysics, and Death: Essays on Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer. Duke University Press
  49. Claudia Mills, Duties to Aging Parents.
    "What do grown children owe their parents?" Over two decades ago philosopher Jane English asked this question and came up with the startling answer: nothing (English 1979). English joins many contemporary philosophers in rejecting the once-traditional view that grown children owe their parents some kind of fitting repayment for past services rendered. The problem with the traditional view, as argued by many, is, first, that parents have duties to provide fairly significant services to their growing children, and persons do not (...)
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  50.  61
    Charles W. Mills (2010). Blacks and Social Justice: A Quarter-Century Later. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (3):354-369.
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