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  1. C. Philip Beaman, Maciej Hanczakowski & Dylan M. Jones (2014). The Effects of Distraction on Metacognition and Metacognition on Distraction: Evidence From Recognition Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  2. Rachel McCloy, C. Philip Beaman & Philip T. Smith (2008). The Relative Success of Recognition‐Based Inference in Multichoice Decisions. Cognitive Science 32 (6):1037-1048.
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  3. C. Philip Beaman & Rachel McCloy (2007). From Base-Rate to Cumulative Respect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):256-257.
    The tendency to neglect base-rates in judgment under uncertainty may be as Barbey & Sloman (B&S) suggest, but it is neither inevitable (as they document; see also Koehler 1996) nor unique. Here we would like to point out another line of evidence connecting ecological rationality to dual processes, the failure of individuals to appropriately judge cumulative probability.
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  4. C. Philip Beaman (2002). Why Are We Good at Detecting Cheaters? A Reply to Fodor. Cognition 83 (2):215-220.
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  5. C. Philip Beaman (2001). The Size and Nature of a Chunk. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):118-118.
    The data presented in the target article make a persuasive case for the notion that there is a fundamental limit on short term memory (STM) of about four items. Two possible means of further testing this claim are suggested and data regarding scene coherence and memory capacity for ordered information are reviewed.
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  6. C. Philip Beaman (2000). Neurons Amongst the Symbols? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):468-470.
    Page's target article presents an argument for the use of localist, connectionist models in future psychological theorising. The “manifesto” marshalls a set of arguments in favour of localist connectionism and against distributed connectionism, but in doing so misses a larger argument concerning the level of psychological explanation that is appropriate to a given domain.
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  7. C. Philip Beaman & John Morton (2000). The Separate but Related Origins of the Recency Effect and the Modality Effect in Free Recall. Cognition 77 (3):B59-B65.
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