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  1. C. R. Hooper (2013). Reply to Hidalgo's 'The Active Recruitment of Health Workers: A Defence' Article. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):611-612.
    Hidalgo offers a novel and interesting defence of the active recruitment of health workers by organisations based in the developed world.1 His conclusions are highly controversial and run directly counter to those drawn by a large number of bioethicists, empirical researchers and national and international organisations interested in the issue of health worker migration.The debate about the effects of the migration of healthcare professionals began in earnest in the 1970s. During this decade a number of researchers argued that migration flows (...)
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  2. C. R. Hooper (2010). Ancillary Care Duties: The Demands of Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):708-711.
    Ancillary care is care that research participants need that is not essential to make the research safe or scientifically valid and is not needed to remedy injuries that eventuate as a result of the research project itself. Ancillary care duties have recently been defended on the grounds of beneficence, entrustment, utility and consent. Justice has also been mentioned as a possible basis of ancillary care duties, but little attention has been paid to this approach. In this paper, the author seeks (...)
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  3. C. R. Hooper & C. Agule (2009). Tobacco Regulation: Autonomy Up in Smoke? Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):365-368.
    Over the past few decades, “Big Tobacco” has spread its tentacles across the developing world with devastating results. The global incidence of smoking has increased exponentially in Africa, Asia and South America and it is leading to an equally rapid increase in the incidence of smoking-induced morbidity and mortality on these continents. The World Health Organization (WHO) has tried to respond to this crisis by devising a set of regulations to limit the spread of smoking, and many countries have bound (...)
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  4. C. R. Hooper (2008). Adding Insult to Injury: The Healthcare Brain Drain. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):684-687.
    Recent reports published by the United Nations and the World Health Organization suggest that the brain drain of healthcare professionals from the developing to the developed world is decimating the provision of healthcare in poor countries. The migration of these key workers is driven by a combination of economic inequalities and the recruitment policies of governments in the rich world. This article assesses the impact of the healthcare brain drain and argues that wealthy countries have a moral obligation to reduce (...)
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