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Catriona Sandilands [8]C. Sandilands [1]
  1. Catriona Sandilands (2004). Eco Homo: Queering the Ecological Body Politic. Social Philosophy Today 19:17-39.
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  2. Catriona Sandilands (2003). Eco Homo. Social Philosophy Today 19:17-39.
    This paper raises the issue of governmentality in popular environmental understandings of the (human) body. Understood as object-subjects of environmental management, “ecological bodies politic” are increasingly produced and organized by disciplinary discourses that have the (ironic) effect of reifying, enclosing and surveilling corporeal experiences in the world, especially for bodies deemed unruly. This paper thus deploys queer theories of corporeal materialization (Butler), and queer histories of corporeal-ecological abjection, toward a political account of embodiment oriented to creative opening and transgression, rather (...)
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  3. Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (2002). Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  4. Catriona Sandilands (2002). Undomesticated Ground. Environmental Ethics 24 (3):333-334.
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  5. Catriona Sandilands (2002). Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space. Environmental Ethics 24 (3):333-334.
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  6. Catriona Sandilands (2001). Desiring Nature, Queering Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (2):169-188.
    I begin from the premise that “environmentalism needs queers.” Given that desire is a significant element in environmental ethics, and that the social organization of sexual-erotic desire has important impacts on human-nonhuman interactions, queer theory promises to aid environmental thought in unraveling and challenging some of these relations. I contribute the following elements to that challenge:the social-sexual organization of natural space; the organizing effects of dominant discourses of reproductive sexuality for both political possibility and bodily experience; and the retrieval (using (...)
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  7. C. Sandilands (1999). Raising Your Hand in the Council of All Beings: Ecofeminism and Citizenship. Ethics and the Environment 4 (2):219-233.
  8. Catriona Sandilands (1999). Ecocritique: Contesting the Politics of Nature, Economy, and Culture. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):209-211.
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  9. Catriona Sandilands (1995). From Natural Identity to Radical Democracy. Environmental Ethics 17 (1):75-91.
    Environmentalism is traversed by a dilemma between a movement toward identity politics and the impossibility of a speaking natural subject; this dilemma calls into question both the relevance of identity politics for ecological struggle and dominant classical constructions of the subject itself. Using Lacanianinspired insights on subjectivity, and the works of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe on radical democracy, I investigate the alternative versions of the subject implicit in ecological discourses and suggest that it is through these alternatives that environmentalism (...)
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