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Catherine Wilson [171]Curtis Wilson [34]Colin Wilson [28]C. Wilson [11]
Christopher Wilson [5]Curtis A. Wilson [2]Camille M. Wilson [2]Craig M. Wilson [2]

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Profile: Catherine Wilson (University of York, Oxford University)
Profile: Catherine Wilson (University of York)
Profile: Colin Wilson (Preston Trchnical Institution Uk)
Profile: Colin Wilson (University of New England)
Profile: Christopher Wilson
Profile: Caroline Ann Wilson (University of the Western Cape)
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  1. Carol A. Mullen, Silvia C. Bettez & Camille M. Wilson (2011). Fostering Community Life and Human Civility in Academic Departments Through Covenant Practice. Educational Studies 47 (3):280-305.
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  2.  20
    Lawrence W. Barsalou, W. Kyle Simmons, Aron K. Barbey & Christine D. Wilson (2003). Grounding Conceptual Knowledge in Modality-Specific Systems. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):84-91.
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  3. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  4. Jennifer Culbertson, Paul Smolensky & Colin Wilson (2013). Cognitive Biases, Linguistic Universals, and Constraint‐Based Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):392-424.
    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology—the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages—and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial (...)
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  5.  5
    Colin Wilson (2006). Learning Phonology With Substantive Bias: An Experimental and Computational Study of Velar Palatalization. Cognitive Science 30 (5):945-982.
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  6.  71
    Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  7.  5
    Catherine Wilson (2016). Managing Expectations: Locke on the Material Mind and Moral Mediocrity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:127-146.
    Locke's insistence on the limits of knowledge and the of our epistemological equipment is well understood; it is rightly seen as integrated with his causal theory of ideas and his theory of judgment. Less attention has been paid to the mediocrity theme as it arises in his theory of moral agency. Locke sees definite limits to human willpower. This is in keeping with post-Puritan theology with its new emphasis on divine mercy as opposed to divine justice and recrimination. It also (...)
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  8.  11
    Catherine Wilson (forthcoming). Hume and Vital Materialism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    ABSTRACTHume was not a philosopher famed for what are sometimes called ‘ontological commitments'. Nevertheless, few contemporary scholars doubt that Hume was an atheist, and the present essay tenders the view that Hume was favourably disposed to the 'vital materialism' of post-Newtonian natural philosophers in England, Scotland and France. Both internalist arguments, collating passages from a range of Hume's works, and externalist arguments, reviewing the likely sources of his knowledge of ancient materialism and his association with his materialistic contemporaries are employed.
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  9.  6
    Rene Geanellos & Chris Wilson (2006). Building Bridges: Knowledge Production, Publication and Use. Commentary on Tonelli (2006), Integrating Evidence Into Clinical Practice: An Alternative to Evidence‐Based Approaches. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):299-305.
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  10. Catherine Wilson (1995). The Invisible World Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  11.  41
    C. Wilson (2013). Grief and the Poet. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):77-91.
    Poetry, drama and the novel present readers and viewers with emotionally significant situations that they often experience as moving, and their being so moved is one of the principal motivations for engaging with fictions. If emotions are considered as action-prompting beliefs about the environment, the appetite for sad or frightening drama and literature is difficult to explain, insofar nothing tragic or frightening is actually happening to the reader, and people do not normally enjoy being sad or frightened. The paper argues (...)
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  12.  2
    Catherine Wilson (2016). Another Darwinian Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):237-252.
    I offer a Darwinian perspective on the existence of aesthetic interests, tastes, preferences, and productions. It is distinguished from the approaches of Denis Dutton and Geoffrey Miller, drawing instead on Richard O. Prum's notion of biotic artworlds. The relevance of neuroaesthetics to the philosophy of art is defended.
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  13.  2
    Catherine Wilson (2014). Reid Barbour; David Norbrook .The Works of Lucy Hutchinson. Volume 1 :Translation of Lucretius. Latin Text by Maria Cristina Zerbino. Cxlvi + 455 + 797 Pp., Bibl., Index. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. £200. [REVIEW] Isis 105 (1):216-217.
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  14. Julie Henderson, Christine Wilson, Louise Roberts, Rebecca Munt & Mikaila Crotty (2014). Social Barriers to Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management: The Role of Capital. Nursing Inquiry 21 (4):336-345.
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  15. Catherine Wilson (1989). Leibniz's Metaphysics. Princeton Up.
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  16.  11
    S. Lee, B. G. Kapogiannis, P. M. Flynn, B. J. Rudy, J. Bethel, S. Ahmad, D. Tucker, S. E. Abdalian, D. Hoffman, C. M. Wilson & C. K. Cunningham (2013). Comprehension of a Simplified Assent Form in a Vaccine Trial for Adolescents. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):410-412.
    Introduction Future HIV vaccine efficacy trials with adolescents will need to ensure that participants comprehend study concepts in order to confer true informed assent. A Hepatitis B vaccine trial with adolescents offers valuable opportunity to test youth understanding of vaccine trial requirements in general. Methods Youth reviewed a simplified assent form with study investigators and then completed a comprehension questionnaire. Once enrolled, all youth were tested for HIV and confirmed to be HIV-negative. Results 123 youth completed the questionnaire (mean age=15 (...)
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  17. Catherine Wilson (2011). Moral Progress Without Moral Realism. Philosophical Papers 39 (1):97-116.
    This paper argues that we can acknowledge the existence of moral truths and moral progress without being committed to moral realism. Rather than defending this claim through the more familiar route of the attempted analysis of the ontological commitments of moral claims, I show how moral belief change for the better shares certain features with theoretical progress in the natural sciences. Proponents of the better theory are able to convince their peers that it is formally and empirically superior to its (...)
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  18.  3
    Maria A. De Matteis, Cathal Wilson & Giovanni D'Angelo (2013). Phosphatidylinositol‐4‐Phosphate: The Golgi and Beyond. Bioessays 35 (7):612-622.
  19. Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  20.  66
    C. Wilson (2013). Fiction and Emotion: Replies to My Critics. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):117-123.
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  21.  4
    Rebecca A. Martusewicz, Pamela K. Smith, Sandra Spickard Prettyman, Chloe Wilson, Joe Bishop, Jeff Edmundson, Kelly Young, Steven Mackie, Richard Brosio & Abraham DeLeon (2013). Editorial Board EOV. Educational Studies 49 (6).
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  22.  12
    Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer 35--50.
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  23.  35
    Catherine Wilson (1998). Savagery and the Supersensible: Kant's Universalism in Historical Context. History of European Ideas 24 (4-5):315-330.
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  24.  81
    Catherine Wilson (2011). Moral Truth: Observational or Theoretical? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):97-114.
    Moral properties are widely held to be response-dependent properties of actions, situations, events and persons. There is controversy as to whether the putative response-dependence of these properties nullifies any truth-claims for moral judgements, or rather supports them. The present paper argues that moral judgements are more profitably compared with theoretical judgements in the natural sciences than with the judgements of immediate sense-perception. The notion of moral truth is dependent on the notion of moral knowledge, which in turn is best understood (...)
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  25.  34
    Catherine Wilson (2004). Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):281 - 298.
  26.  35
    Catherine Wilson (2001). Prospects for Non-Cognitivism. Inquiry 44 (3):291 – 314.
    This essay offers a defence of the non-cognitivist approach to the interpretation of moral judgments as disguised imperatives corresponding to social rules. It addresses the body of criticism that faced R. M. Hare, and that currently faces moral anti-realists, on two levels, by providing a full semantic analysis of evaluative judgments and by arguing that anti-realism is compatible with moral aspiration despite the non-existence of obligations as the externalist imagines them. A moral judgment consists of separate descriptive and prescriptive components (...)
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  27.  39
    Catherine Wilson (forthcoming). Darwin and Nietzsche: Selection, Evolution, and Morality. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
  28.  20
    Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism: Cavendish and Leibniz. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer 35-50.
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  29.  81
    Catherine Wilson (1993). On Some Alleged Limitations to Moral Endeavor. Journal of Philosophy 60 (6):275-289.
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  30.  85
    Catherine Wilson (1983). Leibnizian Optimism. Journal of Philosophy 80 (11):765-783.
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  31.  5
    Katrina Ferrara, Malena Silva, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau (2015). Spatial Language and the Embedded Listener Model in Parents’ Input to Children. Cognitive Science 40 (4).
    Language is a collaborative act: To communicate successfully, speakers must generate utterances that are not only semantically valid but also sensitive to the knowledge state of the listener. Such sensitivity could reflect the use of an “embedded listener model,” where speakers choose utterances on the basis of an internal model of the listener's conceptual and linguistic knowledge. In this study, we ask whether parents’ spatial descriptions incorporate an embedded listener model that reflects their children's understanding of spatial relations and spatial (...)
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  32.  38
    Catherine Wilson (2005). What is the Importance of Descartes’s Meditation Six? Philosophica 76.
    In this essay, I argu e that Descartes considered his theory that the body is an inn ervated machine – in which the soul is situated – to be his most original contribution to philosophy. His ambition to prove the immortality of the soul was very poorly realized, a predictable outcome, insofar as his aims were ethical, not theological. His dualism accordingly requires reassessment.
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  33.  13
    Charles Henry Wilson (2000). 1914–1991. Proceedings of the British Academy 105:555-574.
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  34.  9
    Catherine Wilson (2015). The Doors of Perception and the Artist Within. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):1-20.
    This paper discusses the significance for the philosophy of perception and aesthetics of certain productions of the ‘offline brain’. These are experienced in hypnagogic and other trance states, and in disease- or drug-induced hallucination. They bear a similarity to other visual patterns in nature, and reappear in human artistry, especially of the craft type. The reasons behind these resonances are explored, along with the question why we are disposed to find geometrical complexity and ‘supercolouration’ beautiful. The paper concludes with a (...)
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  35.  45
    Catherine Wilson (2000). Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 10:1-20.
    Leibniz entertained the idea that, as a set of “striving possibles” competes for existence, the largest and most perfect world comes into being. The paper proposes 8 criteria for a Leibniz-world. It argues that a) there is no algorithm e.g., one involving pairwise compossibility-testing that can produce even possible Leibniz-worlds; b) individual substances presuppose completed worlds; c) the uniqueness of the actual world is a matter of theological preference, not an outcome of the assembly-process; and d) Goedel’s theorem implies that (...)
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  36.  22
    Catherine Wilson (1991). Leibniz and Strawson. International Studies in Philosophy 23 (3):99-100.
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  37. Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This sensitive, engaging, and richly documented book examines the Scientific Revolution and the formation of the canon of early modern philosophy in light of the rediscovery and reworking of the materialistic philosophy of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius. It is written in a manner intended to be accessible to all readers, but it will be of special interest to historians interested in seventeenth century science, philosophy, politics, and morals; to philosophers interested in the origins of materialism, and to classicists (...)
     
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  38.  18
    Catherine Wilson (2013). Darwin and Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
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  39.  59
    C. Wilson (2006). Review: The Moral Demands of Affluence. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1122-1126.
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  40.  12
    Curtis Wilson (1985). Measuring the Universe: Cosmic Dimensions From Aristarchus to Halley. Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):151-153.
  41.  17
    Catherine Wilson (1988). Visual Surface and Visual Symbol: The Microscope and the Occult in Early Modern Science. Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (1):85.
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  42. Catherine Wilson (1990). Michael R. Matthews, Ed., The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (6):243-244.
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  43. Colin Wilson (1998). Below the Iceberg Anti-Sartre and Other Essays.
     
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  44.  43
    Catherine Wilson (1983). Literature and Knowledge. Philosophy 58 (226):489 - 496.
    There is probably no subject in the philosophy of art which has prompted more impassioned theorizing than the question of the ‘cognitive value’ of works of art. ‘In the end’, one influential critic has stated, ‘I do not distinguish between science and art except as regards method. Both provide us with a view of reality and both are indispensable to a complete understanding of the universe.’ If a man is not prepared to distinguish between science and art one may well (...)
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  45.  29
    Catherine Wilson (1994). Berkeley and the Microworld. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 76 (1):37-64.
  46. Catherine Wilson (2000). Descartes and the Corporeal Mind: Some Implications of the Regius Affair. In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge 659--79.
     
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  47.  5
    Sara Gifford, Shirley Reynolds, Sarah Bell & Charlotte Wilson (2008). Threat Interpretation Bias in Anxious Children and Their Mothers. Cognition and Emotion 22 (3):497-508.
  48.  4
    Catherine Wilson (1992). Leibniz's Metaphysics: A Historical and Comparative Study. Philosophical Review 101 (4):853-855.
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  49.  10
    Curtis Wilson (1999). Machamer, Peter, Ed. The Cambridge Companion to Galileo. Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):178-179.
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  50.  13
    Catherine Wilson (1995). 13 The Reception of Leibniz in the Eighteenth Century. In Nicholas Jolley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Cambridge University Press 442.
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