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Christopher Yeomans [8]Chris Yeomans [1]C. Yeomans [1]
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Profile: Christopher Yeomans (Purdue University)
  1. Christopher Yeomans (2013). Talents and Interests: A Hegelian Moral Psychology. Hegel Bulletin 34 (1):33-58.
    One of the reasons why there is no Hegelian school in contemporary ethics in the way that there are Kantian, Humean and Aristotelian schools is because Hegelians have been unable to clearly articulate the Hegelian alternative to those schools’ moral psychologies, i.e., to present a Hegelian model of the motivation to, perception of, and responsibility for moral action. Here it is argued that in its most basic terms Hegel's model can be understood as follows: the agent acts in a responsible (...)
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  2. C. Yeomans (2012). Hegel's Critique of Metaphysics. Philosophical Review 121 (3):472-474.
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  3. Christopher Yeomans (2012). Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency. OUP USA.
    There are many insightful discussions of Hegel's practical philosophy that emphasize the uniqueness of his expressivist and social theory of agency, but few recognize that these two aspects of Hegel's theory of the will are insufficient to avoid the traditional problem of free will. In fact, the problem can easily be shown to recur in the very language used to express why Hegel's theory is a theory of freedom at all. In part, this lack of recognition results from the fact (...)
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  4. Christopher Yeomans (2010). A Commentary to Hegel's Science of Logic, by David Gray Carlson. [REVIEW] Mind 119 (475):783-786.
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  5. Christopher Yeomans (2010). " Acting on" Instead of" Stepping Back": Hegel's Conception of the Relation Between Motivations and the Free Will. Contrastes 1 (cialidad y subjetividad humanas):377-387.
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  6. Christopher Yeomans (2010). Hegel and Analytic Philosophy of Action. The Owl of Minerva 42 (1-2):41-62.
    A primary fault line in the analytic philosophy of action is the debate between causal/Davidsonian and interpretivist/Anscombian theories of action. The fundamental problem of the former is producing a criterion for distinguishing intentional from non-intentional causal chains; the fundamental problem of the latter is producing an account of the relation between reasons and actions that is represented by the ‘because’ in the claim that the agent acted because she had the reason. It is argued that Hegel’s conception of teleology can (...)
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  7. Christopher Yeomans (2009). Robert Pippin: Hegel's Practical Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (4):783-787.
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  8. Christopher Yeomans (2009). Contradiction in Motion. Review of Metaphysics 62 (3):657-659.
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  9. Chris Yeomans (2007). Hegel, Idealism, and Analytic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):686-687.
  10. Christopher Yeomans (2006). Thomas Reid and Some Regress Arguments. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (1):54-81.
    This paper reconstructs Reid's responses to regress arguments against the possibility of free will, highlighting the role played by long-term decisions (“general fixed purposes”) in the explanation of paradigmatic free actions on Reid's account. In addition to reconstructing Reid's response to the two versions of the regress argument that he explicitly discusses, I also construct a Reidian response to Galen Strawson's contemporary version of the regress argument. The depth of Reid's position is most apparent in the resources it provides for (...)
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