Search results for 'Cambridge Platonism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    By Eric B. Baum Cambridge (2004). Charles Taylor. Contemporary Philosophy in Focus. By Ruth Abbey, Editor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. Xi, 220. Right, Wrong and Science: The Ethical Dimensions of the Techno-Scientific Enterprise. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities, Vol. 81. By Evandro Agazzi. Edited by Craig Dilworth. Atlantic Highlands. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 113 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  46
    Michael B. Gill (2010). From Cambridge Platonism to Scottish Sentimentalism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):13-31.
    The Cambridge Platonists were a group of religious thinkers who attended and taught at Cambridge from the 1640s until the 1660s. The four most important of them were Benjamin Whichcote, John Smith, Ralph Cudworth, and Henry More. The most prominent sentimentalist moral philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment – Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith – knew of the works of the Cambridge Platonists. But the Scottish sentimentalists typically referred to the Cambridge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  28
    John Henry (1986). A Cambridge Platonist's Materialism: Henry More and the Concept of Soul. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 49:172-195.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  1
    Allison Coudert (1975). A Cambridge Platonist's Kabbalist Nightmare. Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (4):633.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  10
    Benjamin Carter (2006). Cambridge Platonist Spirituality. Faith and Philosophy 23 (3):361-363.
  6.  3
    Henry G. Van Leeuwen (1964). Henry More, the Rational Theology of a Cambridge Platonist. Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (1):100-104.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Dominic Scott (1990). Recollection and Cambridge Platonism. Hermathena 149:73-97.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. David Leech (2002). "Plato and Deep Plotin": Cambridge Platonism, Platonicall Triads, and More's Reflections on Nature. Dionysius 20:179-198.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  6
    Jasper Reid (2004). Review of Robert Crocker, Henry More, 1614-1687: A Biography of the Cambridge Platonist. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (9).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Frederick C. Beiser (1996). CHAPTER 4. Cambridge Platonism. In The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment. Princeton University Press 134-183.
  11. Douglas Hedley, Sarah Hutton & David Leech (eds.) (forthcoming). Cambridge Platonism: Sources and Legacies.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. C. N. R. (1963). Henry More: The Rational Theology of a Cambridge Platonist. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):804-804.
  13. Jean-Michel Vienne (2005). Henry More, 1614–1687: A Biography of the Cambridge Platonist. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 96:651-652.
  14. John Russell Roberts (2012). Whichcote and the Cambridge Platonists on Human Nature: An Interpretation and Defense. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy VI.
    Draft version of essay. ABSTRACT: Benjamin Whichcote developed a distinctive account of human nature centered on our moral psychology. He believed that this view of human nature, which forms the foundation of “Cambridge Platonism,” showed that the demands of reason and faith are not merely compatible but dynamically supportive of one another. I develop an interpretation of this oft-neglected and widely misunderstood account of human nature and defend its viability against a key (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  5
    Marianne Djuth (2012). Brian Dobell, Augustine's Intellectual Conversion: The Journey From Platonism to Christianity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. Xvii, 250. $86. ISBN: 9780521513395. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (2):540-542.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  4
    Renford Bambrough (1960). The Transmission of Platonism Pierre Courcelle, W. K. C. Guthrie, Olof Gigon, H. I. Marrou, W. Theiler, J. H. Waszink, Richard Walzer: Recherches Sur la Tradition Platonicienne. (Fondation Hardt: Entretiens Sur l'Antiquité Classique, Tome Iii.) Pp. 242. Vandœuvres, Geneva: Fondation Hardt (Cambridge: Heffer), 1958. Cloth, £2 Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 10 (01):29-31.
  17.  7
    M. R. Wright (1995). Plato I J. Moravcsik: Plato and Platonism. Plato's Conception of Appearance and Reality in Ontology, Epistemology and Ethics, and Modern Echoes. (Issues in Ancient Philosophy, 1.) Pp. X+342. Oxford, Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1992. Cased, £40.00. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (02):282-284.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    M. Wright (1996). A. Baldwin, S. Hutton (Edd.): Platonism and the English Imagination. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. The Classical Review 46 (1):147-149.
  19.  19
    Jonathan Barnes (1986). The Fourth Academy Harold Tarrant: Scepticism or Platonism? The Philosophy of the Fourth Academy. (Cambridge Classical Studies.) Pp. Ix+182. Cambridge University Press, 1985. £19.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (01):75-77.
  20.  13
    W. Hamilton (1938). The Middle Platonism R. E. Witt: Albinus and the History of Middle Platonism. Pp. Xii + 147. (Cambridge Classical Studies, III; Also Serving as Transactions of the Cambridge Philological Society, VII.) Cambridge: University Press, 1937. Cloth, 7s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):17-.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  5
    Marie V. Williams (1912). The Vitality of Platonism and Other Essays The Vitality of Platonism and Other Essays. By James Adam, Late Fellow and and Senior Tutor of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Edited by His Wife, Adela Marion Adam, 1 Vol. 8vo. Pp. 242. Cambridge: University Press, 1911. 7s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (07):224-225.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  5
    George Zografidis (2013). Siniossoglou N. Radical Platonism in Byzantium: Illumination and Utopia in Gemistos Plethon. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. Xvi + 454. £70. 9781107013032. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 133:306-307.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  8
    Alexei V. Zadorojnyi (2001). Trails of Scepticism J. Opsomer: In Search of the Truth. Academic Tendencies in Middle Platonism . Pp. 332. Brussels: Verhandelingen van de Koninklijke Academie Voor Wetenschappen, Letteren En Schone Kunsten van België, 1998. Paper, Euro 35 (Approx.). ISBN: 90-6569-666-0. M. A. Wlodarczyk: Pyrrhonian Inquiry . Pp. X + 72. Cambridge: The Cambridge Philological Society, 2000. Paper. ISBN: 0-906014-24-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (02):295-.
  24.  6
    G. C. Field (1939). Platonism Ancient and Modern. By Paul Shorey. Pp. Vi+259. (Sather Classical Lectures, Vol. 14.) Berkeley: University of California Press (Cambridge: University Press), 1938. Cloth, Us. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (5-6):217-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Maeve O'Brien (2015). Apuleius the Philosopher. R. Fletcher Apuleius’ Platonism. The Impersonation of Philosophy. Pp. XII + 319. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £65, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-02547-9. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (2):476-478.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. John Russell Roberts, Innate Ideas Without Abstract Ideas: An Essay on Berkeley's Platonism.
    Draft. Berkeley denied the existence of abstract ideas and any faculty of abstraction. At the same time, however, he embraced innate ideas and a faculty of pure intellect. This paper attempts to reconcile the tension between these commitments by offering an interpretation of Berkeley's Platonism.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  18
    Wesley Erdelack (2011). Antivoluntarism and the Birth of Autonomy. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):651-679.
    Traditionalist and radical orthodox critiques of the Enlightenment assert that the modern discourse on moral self-government constitutes a radical break with the theocentric model of morality which preceded it. Against this view, this paper argues that the conceptions of autonomy emerged from the effort to reconcile commitments within the Christian tradition. Through an analysis of the moral thought of the Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth, this paper contends that distinctively Christian theological concerns concerning moral accountability to God and the character (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  4
    C. A. Patrides (1980). The Cambridge Platonists. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume contains the selected discourses of four seventeenth-century philosophers, carefully chosen to illustrate the tenets characteristic of the influential movement known as Cambridge Platonism. Fundamental to their beliefs is the statement most clearly voiced by Benjamin Whichcote, their leader by common consent, that the spiritual is not opposed to the rational, nor Grace to nature. Religion is based on reason, even in the presence of 'mystery'. Free will and Grace are not mutually exclusive. The editor's comprehensive (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  17
    Douglas Hedley (2012). Forms of Reflection, Imagination, and the Love of Wisdom. Metaphilosophy 43 (1-2):112-124.
    This article reflects upon the relationship between philosophy and theology. It further considers the persisting relevance of the specifically Hellenic inheritance of philosophy as contemplation and the Delphic exhortation, “Know thyself!” It concludes with reflections upon the role of imagination in relation to the philosophical idea of God as the supreme and transcendent causal principle of the physical cosmos.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Douglas Hedley & Sarah Hutton (eds.) (2008). Platonism and the Origins of Modernity: The Platonic Tradition and the Rise of Modern Philosophy. Springer.
    International Archives of the History of Ideas Archives internationales d'histoire des idées, Vol. 196. -/- Introduction, S. Hutton; Nicholas of Cusa : Platonism at the Dawn of Modernity, D. Moran; At Variance: Marsilio Ficino Platonism And Heresy, M.J.B. Allen; Going Naked into the Shrine:Herbert, Plotinus and the Consructive Metaphor, S.R.L.Clark; Commenius, Light Metaphysics and Educational Reform, J. Rohls ; Robert Fludd’s Kabbalistic Cosmos, W. Schmidt-Biggeman; Reconciling Theory and Fact:The Problem of ‘Other Faiths’ in Lord Herbert and the (...) Platonists, D. Pailin; Trinity, Community and Love: Cudworth’s Platonism and the Idea of God, L. Armour; Chaos and Order in Cudworth’s Thought, J-L. Breteau; Cudworth, Prior and Passmore on the Autonomy of Ethics, R. Attfield; Substituting Aristotle: Platonic Themes In Dutch Cartesianism, H. van Ruler; Soul, Body, And World: Plato’s Timaeus And Descartes’ Meditations, C. Wilson ; Locke, Plato and Platonism, G.A.J. Rogers; Reflections on Locke’s Platonism, V. Nuovo; The Platonism at the Core of Leibniz’s Philosophy, C. Mercer; Leibniz and Berkeley: Platonic Metaphysics and ‘The Mechanical Philosophy’, S. Brown; Which Platonism for which Modernity? A Note on Shaftesbury’s Socratic Sea-Cards, L. Jaffro; Platonism, Aesthetics and the Sublime at the Origins Of Modernity, D. Hedley. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  2
    Cora Diamond (1977). Wittgenstein's Lectures on the Foundations of Mathematics, Cambridge 1939. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (4):584-586.
    For several terms at Cambridge in 1939, Ludwig Wittgenstein lectured on the philosophical foundations of mathematics. A lecture class taught by Wittgenstein, however, hardly resembled a lecture. He sat on a chair in the middle of the room, with some of the class sitting in chairs, some on the floor. He never used notes. He paused frequently, sometimes for several minutes, while he puzzled out a problem. He often asked his listeners questions and reacted to their replies. Many meetings (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  32.  5
    Robert L. Armstrong (1969). Cambridge Platonists and Locke on Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 30 (2):191-205.
    The cambridge platonists exemplify the fear that newtonian natural philosophy subverts the status of traditional moral and religious beliefs, Which are strongly supported by the innate idea doctrine since it justifies them independently of the senses and the material universe. Isaac barrow, Friend and teacher of newton, Also employs the doctrine approbatively to support his metaphysics as a science of basic principles that constitute the foundation of natural science. Locke's rejection of the doctrine is analyzed and it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33. Paul Redding, Mind of God, Point of View of Man, or Spirit of the World? Platonism and Organicism in the Thought of Kant and Hegel.
    In his account of Plato’s ideas in the first book of the “Transcendental Dialectic”, “On the concepts of pure reason”, Kant, in describing how for Plato ideas were “archetypes of things themselves”, adds that these ideas “flowed from the highest reason, through which human reason partakes in them”.1 Later, in the section of the Transcendental Dialectic treating the “ideals of pure reason”, he again attributes to Plato the notion of a “divine mind” within which the “ideas” exist. An “ideal”, Kant (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  14
    Jennifer A. Herdt (2001). The Rise of Sympathy and the Question of Divine Suffering. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):367 - 399.
    Seventeenth-century Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth, writing just at the time when the concept of sympathy was moving from the realm of magic to that of ethics, argued that God must be understood as having a vital sympathy with suffering human beings. Yet while Cudworth invoked sympathy in an attempt to capture God's intimate relation with creation, in fact, it served as a principle of mediation that tended either to collapse God into the world or to distance God from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  68
    Edward Slowik (2013). Newton's Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Steven M. Nadler (ed.) (2000). The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. Cambridge University Press.
    The French philosopher and theologian Nicolas Malebranche was one of the most important thinkers of the early modern period. A bold and unorthodox thinker, he tried to synthesize the new philosophy of Descartes with religious Platonism. This is the first collection of essays to address Malebranche's thought comprehensively and systematically. There are chapters devoted to Malebranche's metaphysics, his doctrine of the soul, his epistemology, the celebrated debate with Arnauld, his philosophical method, his occasionalism and theory of causality, his philosophical (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  37. Gareth Matthews (2004). Anselm, Augustine, and Platonism. In Brian Leftow (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Anselm. Cambridge Univ Pr 82.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  27
    C. Wilson (2002). The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. Philosophical Review 111 (1):108-113.
    The French philosopher and theologian Nicholas Malebranche was one of the most important thinkers of the early modern period. A bold and unorthodox thinker, he tried to synthesize the new philosophy of Descartes with the religious Platonism of St. Augustine. This is the first collection of essays to address Malebranche's thought comprehensively and systematically. There are chapters devoted to Malebranche's metaphysics, his doctrine of the soul, his epistemology, the celebrated debate with Arnauld, his philosophical method, his occasionalism and theory (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Lloyd P. Gerson (1999). The Cambridge Companion to Plotinus. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 61 (1):159-160.
    Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. Plotinus was the greatest philosopher in the 700-year period between Aristotle and Augustine. He thought of himself as a disciple (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  1
    Richard Tieszen (1995). Many of the Basic Problems in the Philosophy of Mathematics Center Around the Positions Just Mentioned. It Will Not Be Possible to Dis-Cuss These Problems in Any Detail Here, but at Least Some General Indications Can Be Given. A Major Difficulty for Platonism has Been to Explain How It Is. [REVIEW] In Barry Smith & David Woodruff Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Husserl. Cambridge University Press 438.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Miguel de Beistegui (2012). 3 The Deleuzian Reversal of Platonism. In Daniel W. Smith & Henry Somers-Hall (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Deleuze. Cambridge University Press
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.) (1996). The Cambridge Companion to Plotinus. Cambridge University Press.
    Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. Plotinus was the greatest philosopher in the 700-year period between Aristotle and Augustine. He thought of himself as a disciple (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  8
    Daniel W. Smith & Henry Somers-Hall (eds.) (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Deleuze. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Henry Somers-Hall; 1. Deleuze and the history of philosophy Daniel W. Smith; 2. Difference and repetition James Williams; 3. The Deleuzian reversal of Platonism Miguel Beistegui; 4. Deleuze and Kant Beth Lord; 5. Phenomenology and metaphysics, and chaos: on the fragility of the event in Deleuze Leonard Lawlor; 6. Deleuze and structuralism François Dosse; 7. Deleuze and Guattari: Guattareuze and Co. Gary Genosko; 8. Nomadic ethics Rosi Braidotti; 9. Deleuze's political philosophy Paul Patton; 10. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Eric Schliesser (2013). Newtonian Emanation, Spinozism, Measurement and the Baconian Origins of the Laws of Nature. Foundations of Science 18 (3):449-466.
    The first two sections of this paper investigate what Newton could have meant in a now famous passage from “De Graviatione” (hereafter “DeGrav”) that “space is as it were an emanative effect of God.” First it offers a careful examination of the four key passages within DeGrav that bear on this. The paper shows that the internal logic of Newton’s argument permits several interpretations. In doing so, the paper calls attention to a Spinozistic strain in Newton’s thought. Second it sketches (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45. Jasper William Reid (2007). The Evolution of Henry More's Theory of Divine Absolute Space. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):79-102.
    : This paper charts the gradual development of a theory of real space, underlying the created world and constituted by the extension of God Himself, in the writings of the Cambridge Platonist, Henry More. It identifies two impediments to More's embracing such a theory in the earlier part of his career, namely his initial commitment to the principles that (a) space was not real and (b) God was not extended, and it shows how he finally came to renounce these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46.  15
    Charles Taliaferro (2005). Evidence and Faith: Philosophy and Religion Since the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taliaferro has written a dynamic narrative history of philosophical reflection on religion from the seventeenth century to the present, with an emphasis on shifting views of faith and the nature of evidence. The book begins with the movement called Cambridge Platonism, which formed a bridge between the ancient and medieval worlds and early modern philosophy. While the book provides a general overview of different movements in philosophy, it also offers a detailed exposition and reflection on key arguments. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  47.  5
    Jasper Reid (2012). The Metaphysics of Henry More. Springer.
    The book surveys the key metaphysical contributions of the Cambridge Platonist, Henry More (1614–1687).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  41
    P. M. S. Hacker (1996). The Rise of Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy. Ratio 9 (3):243-268.
    The classificatory concept of analytic philosophy cannot fruitfully be given an analytic definition, nor is it a family-resemblance concept. Dummett's contention that it is 'the philosophy of thought' whose main tenet is that an account of thought is to be attained through an account of language is rejected for historical and analytic reasons. Analytic philosophy is most helpfully understood as a historical category earmarking a leading trend in twentieth-century philosophy originating in Cambridge. Its first three phases, viz. Cambridge (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  21
    Koen Vermeir (2008). Imagination Between Physick and Philosophy. Intellectual History Review 18 (1):119-137.
    I argue that the imagination plays a central role in the thought of the Cambridge Platonist Henry More. First, physiological descriptions of melancholy and imagination were at the heart of his attack against enthusiasm and atheism. Second, in order to defend his metaphysical dualism, he had to respond to traditional accounts of the imagination as a mediating faculty between body and soul. Third, More also opposed the traditional view that the imagination was a material faculty, because in the context (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  22
    Jacqueline Broad (2006). A Woman's Influence? John Locke and Damaris Masham on Moral Accountability. Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):489-510.
    Some scholars suggest that John Locke’s revisions to the chapter “Of Power” for the 1694 second edition of his Essay concerning Human Understanding may be indebted to the Cambridge Platonist, Ralph Cudworth. Their claims rest on evidence that Locke may have had access to Cudworth’s unpublished manuscript treatises on free will. In this paper, I examine an alternative suggestion – the claim that Cudworth’s daughter, Damaris Cudworth Masham, and not Cudworth himself, may have exerted an influence on Locke’s revisions. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000