Search results for 'Cambridge Platonists Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. By Eric B. Baum Cambridge (2004). Charles Taylor. Contemporary Philosophy in Focus. By Ruth Abbey, Editor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. Xi, 220. Right, Wrong and Science: The Ethical Dimensions of the Techno-Scientific Enterprise. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities, Vol. 81. By Evandro Agazzi. Edited by Craig Dilworth. Atlantic Highlands. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 113 (2).score: 120.0
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  2. C. A. Patrides (1980). The Cambridge Platonists. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    This volume contains the selected discourses of four seventeenth-century philosophers, carefully chosen to illustrate the tenets characteristic of the influential movement known as Cambridge Platonism. Fundamental to their beliefs is the statement most clearly voiced by Benjamin Whichcote, their leader by common consent, that the spiritual is not opposed to the rational, nor Grace to nature. Religion is based on reason, even in the presence of 'mystery'. Free will and Grace are not mutually exclusive. The editor's comprehensive introduction delineates (...)
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  3. Frederick J. Powicke (1926/2006). The Cambridge Platonists: A Study. Martino Pub..score: 84.0
    Some characteristics of the Cambridge Platonists -- Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1683) -- John Smith (1616-1652) -- Ralph Cudworth (1617-1685) -- Nathaniel Culverwel (1618?-1651) -- Henry More (1614-1687) -- Peter Sterry (d. 1672).
     
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  4. Frederick J. Powicke (1971/1970). The Cambridge Platonists. [Hamden, Conn.]Archon Books.score: 84.0
    Prologue.--Some characteristics of the Cambridge Platonists.--Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1683)--John Smith (1616-1652)--Ralph Cudworth (1617-1685)--Nathaniel Culverwel (1618?-1651)--Henry More (1614-1687)--Peter Sterry (d. 1672)--Epilogue.
     
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  5. Richard W. F. Kroll, Richard Ashcraft & Perez Zagorin (eds.) (1992). Philosophy, Science, and Religion in England, 1640-1700. Cambridge University Press.score: 74.0
    This collection of essays looks at the distinctively English intellectual, social and political phenomenon of Latitudinarianism, which emerged during the Civil War and Interregnum and came into its own after the Restoration, becoming a virtual orthodoxy after 1688. Dividing into two parts, it first examines the importance of the Cambridge Platonists, who sought to embrace the newest philosophical and scientific movements within Church of England orthodoxy, and then moves into the later seventeenth century, from the Restoration onwards, culminating (...)
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  6. Ben Lazare Mijuskovic (1974). The Achilles of Rationalist Arguments: The Simplicity, Unity, and Identity of Thought and Soul From the Cambridge Platonists to Kant: A Study in the History of an Argument. Martinus Nijhoff.score: 70.0
    INTRODUCTION TO THE ARGUMENT AND ITS HISTORY PRIOR TO THE AND CENTURIES In the history of ideas, there is an argument that has been used repeatedly, ...
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  7. Eugene Munger Austin (1935). The Ethics of the Cambridge Platonists. Philadelphia.score: 70.0
     
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  8. John John De Boer (1931). The Theory of Knowledge of the Cambridge Platonists. Madras, Methodist Publishing House.score: 70.0
     
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  9. Geoffrey Philip Henry Pawson (1930). The Cambridge Platonists and Their Place in Religious Thought. London, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.score: 70.0
     
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  10. John Russell Roberts (2012). Whichcote and the Cambridge Platonists on Human Nature: An Interpretation and Defense. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy VI.score: 62.0
    Draft version of essay. ABSTRACT: Benjamin Whichcote developed a distinctive account of human nature centered on our moral psychology. He believed that this view of human nature, which forms the foundation of “Cambridge Platonism,” showed that the demands of reason and faith are not merely compatible but dynamically supportive of one another. I develop an interpretation of this oft-neglected and widely misunderstood account of human nature and defend its viability against a key objection.
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  11. Ruth Ap Roberts (forthcoming). Arnold and Cambridge Platonists. Clio.score: 56.0
    Matthew arnold maintains in the nineteenth century the renaissance school of the cambridge platonists. for them, reason and religion are by no means at odds: reason is in fact "the candle of the lord." for matthew arnold in "literature and dogma", christianity will prevail only by being shorn of its supernaturalist elements and set on its true rational ground. ernst cassirer has shown how the cambridge platonists bridge the gap between the italian renaissance and the german (...)
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  12. Robert L. Armstrong (1969). Cambridge Platonists and Locke on Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 30:191-205.score: 56.0
    The cambridge platonists exemplify the fear that newtonian natural philosophy subverts the status of traditional moral and religious beliefs, Which are strongly supported by the innate idea doctrine since it justifies them independently of the senses and the material universe. Isaac barrow, Friend and teacher of newton, Also employs the doctrine approbatively to support his metaphysics as a science of basic principles that constitute the foundation of natural science. Locke's rejection of the doctrine is analyzed and it is (...)
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  13. Sterling P. Lamprecht (1926). Innate Ideas in the Cambridge Platonists. Philosophical Review 35 (6):553-573.score: 42.0
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  14. J. H. Muirhead (1927). The Cambridge Platonists (I). Mind 36 (142):158-178.score: 42.0
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  15. Sarah Hutton (2001). Cambridge Platonists. In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 42.0
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  16. J. H. Muirhead (1927). The Cambridge Platonists (II). Mind 36 (143):326-341.score: 42.0
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  17. Jeffrey Edwards (2000). The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context. Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):727-728.score: 42.0
  18. S. F. (1999). G. A. J. Rogers, J. M. Vienne and Y. C. Zarka (Eds.) The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context: Politics, Metaphysics and Religion. (International Archives of the History of Ideas). (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997). Pp. XIV+249. NLG 250.00, £89.00 Hbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 35 (1):113-116.score: 42.0
  19. Jens Lemanski (2011). Von Brucker Zu Augustinus. Probleme Mit der Geschichte des Begriffs 'Neuplatonismus'. Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte 53:33-53.score: 42.0
    Normally in nowadays philosophical research the term 'Neoplatonism' is coined and it was used the first time by Jacob Brucker in the first half of the 18th century. But there are signs that the concept is much older. So this essay follows the trace of the term 'Neoplatonism' from german philosophical historians, like Büsching and Brucker, back to the Cambridge Platonists and tries to demonstrate that the origin of the concept is based on some texts of the late (...)
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  20. Marjorie Nicolson (1930). George Keith and the Cambridge Platonists. Philosophical Review 39 (1):36-55.score: 42.0
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  21. A. Babolin (1983). Science and Religious Belief Among the Cambridge Platonists. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 75 (1):76-86.score: 42.0
     
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  22. Big Bang (2003). Biology 78, 79; Biological Complexity 73, 133; Function 88, 266" Blind Watchmaker" Hypothesis 133 Buddhism 204 Cambridge Platonists 81, 88. [REVIEW] In Paul K. Moser & Paul Copan (eds.), The Rationality of Theism. Routledge. 78--80.score: 42.0
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  23. Yannis Constantinidès (2011). Makers and Heirs of the Enlightenment. The Cambridge Platonists Mirrored by Joseph de Maistre / Philippe Barthelet ; Maistre's Rousseaus / Carolina Armenteros ; Two Great Enemies of the Enlightenment : Joseph de Maistre and Schopenhauer. In Carolina Armenteros & Richard Lebrun (eds.), Joseph de Maistre and the Legacy of Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation.score: 42.0
  24. Gerald R. Cragg (ed.) (1968/1985). The Cambridge Platonists. University Press of America.score: 42.0
     
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  25. E. M. Curley (1971). The Cambridge Platonists. Philosophical Studies 20:368-369.score: 42.0
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  26. N. Fairlamb (2005). GAJ Rogers, JM Vienne and YC Zarka: The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context. Politics, Metaphysics and Religion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):580.score: 42.0
     
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  27. Alan Gabbey (1993). “A Disease Incurable”: Scepticism and the Cambridge Platonists. In Richard H. Popkin & Arie Johan Vanderjagt (eds.), Scepticism and Irreligion in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. E.J. Brill.score: 42.0
     
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  28. Michael J. Langford (1972). Gerald R. Cragg (Editor). The Cambridge Platonists. Pp. Xiii + 451. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1968.) £3·60. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 8 (2):181.score: 42.0
  29. W. F. S. M. (1999). G. A. J. Rogers, J. M. Vienne and Y. C. Zarka (Eds.) The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context: Politics, Metaphysics and Religion. (International Archives of the History of Ideas). (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997). Pp. Xiv+249. NLG 250.00, £89.00 Hbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 35 (1):113-116.score: 42.0
  30. Rudolf De Smet & Karin Verelst (2001). Newton's Scholium Generale: The Platonic and Stoic Legacy — Philo, Justus Lipsius and the Cambridge Platonists. History of Science 39 (123):30.score: 42.0
  31. Mario Micheletti (2011). I Platonici di Cambridge: Il Pensiero Etico E Religioso. Morcelliana.score: 37.0
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  32. Luisa Simonutti (ed.) (2007). Forme Del Neoplatonismo: Dall'eredità Ficiniana Ai Platonici di Cambridge: Atti Del Convegno, Firenze, 25-27 Ottobre 2001. [REVIEW] L.S. Olschki.score: 37.0
  33. G. B. R. (1919). The Neo-Platonists. By Thomas Whittaker. (Second Edition). One Volume. 8vo. Pp. Xv + 318. Cambridge: University Press, 1918. 23s Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (7-8):164-.score: 36.0
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  34. Jennifer A. Herdt (2001). The Rise of Sympathy and the Question of Divine Suffering. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):367 - 399.score: 34.7
    Seventeenth-century Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth, writing just at the time when the concept of sympathy was moving from the realm of magic to that of ethics, argued that God must be understood as having a vital sympathy with suffering human beings. Yet while Cudworth invoked sympathy in an attempt to capture God's intimate relation with creation, in fact, it served as a principle of mediation that tended either to collapse God into the world or to distance God from the (...)
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  35. Michael B. Gill (2010). From Cambridge Platonism to Scottish Sentimentalism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):13-31.score: 34.0
    The Cambridge Platonists were a group of religious thinkers who attended and taught at Cambridge from the 1640s until the 1660s. The four most important of them were Benjamin Whichcote, John Smith, Ralph Cudworth, and Henry More. The most prominent sentimentalist moral philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment – Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith – knew of the works of the Cambridge Platonists. But the Scottish sentimentalists typically referred to the Cambridge Platonists only briefly (...)
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  36. Ralph Cudworth (1678/1978). The True Intellectual System of the Universe, 1678. Garland Pub..score: 28.0
  37. Author unknown, Ralph Cudworth. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 28.0
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  38. Ernst Cassirer (1953/1970). The Platonic Renaissance in England. New York,Gordian Press.score: 28.0
  39. William Cecil De Pauley (1937/1970). The Candle of the Lord. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 28.0
    Benjamin Whichcote.--Benjamin Whichcote and Jeremy Taylor.--John Smith.--Ralph Cudworth.--Henry More.--Richard Cumberland.--Nathanael Culverwel.--George Rust.--Edward Stillingfleet.--Additional notes: John Calvin.--Lancelot Andrewes: Excerpt on the candle of the Lord.--William Laud: Excerpt on Scripture.
     
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  40. Bruno Marciano (2011). Fra Empirismo E Platonismo: L'Estetica di Berkeley E Il Suo Contesto Filosofico. De Ferrari.score: 28.0
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  41. Simon Patrick (1662/1963). A Brief Account of the New Sect of Latitude-Men (1662). Los Angeles, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California.score: 28.0
     
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  42. Plato (1905/1970). The Myths of Plato. [New York]Barnes and Noble.score: 28.0
     
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  43. John Henry (1986). A Cambridge Platonist's Materialism: Henry More and the Concept of Soul. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 49:172-195.score: 20.0
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  44. Jasper Reid (2004). Review of Robert Crocker, Henry More, 1614-1687: A Biography of the Cambridge Platonist. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (9).score: 20.0
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  45. George E. Karamanolis (2006). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    George Karamanolis breaks new ground in the study of later ancient philosophy by examining the interplay of the two main schools of thought, Platonism and Aristotelianism, from the first century BC to the third century AD. Arguing against prevailing scholarly assumption, he argues that the Platonists turned to Aristotle only in order to elucidate Plato's doctrines and to reconstruct Plato's philosophy, and that they did not hesitate to criticize Aristotle when judging him to be at odds with Plato. Karamanolis (...)
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  46. B. D. Josephson & V. S. Ramachandran (eds.) (1980). Consciousness and the Physical World: Edited Proceedings of an Interdisciplinary Symposium on Consciousness Held at the University of Cambridge in January 1978. Pergamon Press.score: 18.0
    Edited proceedings of an interdisciplinary symposium on consciousness held at the University of Cambridge in January 1978. Includes a foreword by Freeman Dyson. Chapter authors: G. Vesey, R.L. Gregory, H.C. Longuet-Higgins, N.K. Humphrey, H.B. Barlow, D.M. MacKay, B.D. Josephson, M. Roth, V.S. Ramachandran, S. Padfield, and (editorial summary only) E. Noakes. -/- Page numbering convention: 'go to page n' accesses the pair of scanned pages 2n and 2n+1. A text-format version of the book (OCR generated with occasional errors) is (...)
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  47. Lloyd P. Gerson (2005). Aristotle and Other Platonists. Cornell University Press.score: 18.0
    Aristotle and Other Platonists concludes with an assessment of some of the philosophical results of acknowledging harmony."--BOOK JACKET.
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  48. Lawrence C. Paulson (1987). Logic and Computation: Interactive Proof with Cambridge Lcf. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Logic and Computation is concerned with techniques for formal theorem-proving, with particular reference to Cambridge LCF (Logic for Computable Functions). Cambridge LCF is a computer program for reasoning about computation. It combines methods of mathematical logic with domain theory, the basis of the denotational approach to specifying the meaning of statements in a programming language. This book consists of two parts. Part I outlines the mathematical preliminaries: elementary logic and domain theory. They are explained at an intuitive level, (...)
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  49. Helen J. Blackman (2007). The Natural Sciences and the Development of Animal Morphology in Late-Victorian Cambridge. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):71 - 108.score: 18.0
    During the 1870s animal morphologists and embryologists at Cambridge University came to dominate British zoology, quickly establishing an international reputation. Earlier accounts of the Cambridge school have portrayed this success as short-lived, and attributed the school's failure to a more general movement within the life sciences away from museum-based description, towards laboratory-based experiment. More recent work has shown that the shift in the life sciences to experimental work was locally contingent and highly varied, often drawing on and incorporating (...)
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  50. Marsha L. Richmond (2006). The 'Domestication' of Heredity: The Familial Organization of Geneticists at Cambridge University, 1895-1910. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):565 - 605.score: 18.0
    In the early years of Mendelism, 1900-1910, William Bateson established a productive research group consisting of women and men studying biology at Cambridge. The empirical evidence they provided through investigating the patterns of hereditary in many different species helped confirm the validity of the Mendelian laws of heredity. What has not previously been well recognized is that owing to the lack of sufficient institutional support, the group primarily relied on domestic resources to carry out their work. Members of the (...)
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