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  1. Paul Thagard & Cameron Shelley, Emotional Analogies and Analogical Inference.
    Despite the growing appreciation of the relevance of affect to cognition, analogy researchers have paid remarkably little attention to emotion. This paper discusses three general classes of analogy that involve emotions. The most straightforward are analogies and metaphors about emotions, for example "Love is a rose and you better not pick it." Much more interesting are analogies that involve the transfer of emotions, for example in empathy in which people understand the emotions of others by imagining their own emotional reactions (...)
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  2. Cameron Shelley (2012). Discussion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):311-.
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  3. Cameron Shelley (2012). Fairness in Technological Design. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):663-680.
    This paper addresses an important multi-disciplinary issue of current interest, that is, the implications of technological design for fairness. A visual, graphical methodology centered on the Taylor-Russell diagram is proposed to address this issue. The Taylor-Russell diagram helps to identify and explore ways in which predictions built into designs can pit the interests of different constituencies against one another. The configuration of the design represents a trade-off between the interests of the communities involved. Whether or not the trade-off is appropriate (...)
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  4. Cameron Shelley (2012). Lorenzo Magnani: Abductive Cognition: The Epistemological and Eco-Cognitive Dimensions of Hypothetical Reasoning. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 22 (3):263-269.
    Lorenzo Magnani: Abductive Cognition: The Epistemological and Eco-Cognitive Dimensions of Hypothetical Reasoning Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11023-011-9267-6 Authors Cameron Shelley, Centre for Society, Technology, and Values, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada Journal Minds and Machines Online ISSN 1572-8641 Print ISSN 0924-6495.
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  5. Cameron Shelley (2012). On the Impermissibility of Telling Misleading Truths in Kantian Ethics. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):89-91.
    Sandel (2009) has recently revisited the issue of the moral permissibility of telling misleading truths in a Kantian ethical framework. His defense of its permissibility relies on assimilating it to simple truth telling, and discounting its relationship with simple lying. This article presents a refutation of Sandel’s case. It is argued that comparison of misleading truths with telling truths or lies is inconclusive. Instead, comparison with telling of leading truths is appropriate. With this comparison in view, it is clear that (...)
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  6. Cameron Shelley (2010). Does Everyone Think, or Is It Just Me? In W. Carnielli L. Magnani (ed.), Model-Based Reasoning in Science and Technology. 477--494.
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  7. Cameron Shelley (2010). Why Test Animals to Treat Humans? On the Validity of Animal Models. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):292-299.
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  8. Cameron Shelley (2006). Analogical Reasoning with Animal Models in Biomedical Research. In L. Magnani (ed.), Model-Based Reasoning in Science and Engineering. College Publications. 203--213.
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  9. Cameron Shelley (2004). Analogy Counterarguments: A Taxonomy for Critical Thinking. [REVIEW] Argumentation 18 (2):223-238.
    The presentation of analogical arguments in the critical thinking literature fails to reflect cognitive research on analogy. Part of the problem is that these treatments of analogy do not address counterarguments, an important aspect of the analysis of analogical argumentation. In this paper, I present a taxonomy of four counterarguments, false analogy, misanalogy, disanalogy, and counteranalogy, analyzed along two dimensions, orientation and effect. The counterarguments are treated in the framework of the multiconstraint theory of analogy (Holyoak and Thagard, 1995). This (...)
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  10. Cameron Shelley (2004). Book Review: The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 14 (3):423-426.
  11. Cameron Shelley (2002). Analogy Counterarguments and the Acceptability of Analogical Hypotheses. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):477-496.
    The logical empiricists held that an analogical hypothesis does not gain any acceptability from the analogy on which it is founded. On this view, the acceptability of a hypothesis cannot be discounted by criticizing the foundational analogy. Yet scientists commonly appear to level exactly this sort of criticism. If scientists are able to discount the acceptability of analogical hypotheses in this way, then the logical empiricist view is mistaken. I analyze four forms of analogy counterargument, disanalogy, misanalogy, counteranalogy, and false (...)
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  12. Cameron Shelley (2002). The First Inconvenience of Anthropomorphism: The Disanalogy in Part IV of Hume's Dialogues. History of Philosophy Quarterly 19 (2):171-189.
  13. Paul Thagard, Chris Eliasmith, Paul Rusnock & Cameron Shelley (2002). Epistemic Coherence. In R. Elio (ed.), Common sense, reasoning, and rationality. Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science (Vol. 11). Oxford University Press. 104-131.
    Many contemporary philosophers favor coherence theories of knowledge (Bender 1989, BonJour 1985, Davidson 1986, Harman 1986, Lehrer 1990). But the nature of coherence is usually left vague, with no method provided for determining whether a belief should be accepted or rejected on the basis of its coherence or incoherence with other beliefs. Haack's (1993) explication of coherence relies largely on an analogy between epistemic justification and crossword puzzles. We show in this paper how epistemic coherence can be understood in terms (...)
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  14. Cameron Shelley (2001). Aspects of Visual Argument: A Study of the March of Progress. Informal Logic 21 (2).
    The so-called March of Progress depicts human evolution as a linear progression from mohkey to man. Shelley (1996) analyzed this image as a visual argument proceeding through "rhetorical" and "demonstrative" modes of visual logic. In this paper, I confirm and extend this view of visual logic by examining variations of the original March image. These variations show that each mode of visual logic can be altered or isolated in support of new conclusions. Furthermore, the March can be included in a (...)
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  15. Cameron Shelley (2001). The Bicoherence Theory of Situational Irony. Cognitive Science 25 (5):775-818.
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  16. Cameron Shelley (2000). The Influence of Folk Meteorology in the Anaximander Fragment. Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (1):1-17.
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  17. Cameron Shelley (1999). Multiple Analogies in Archaeology. Philosophy of Science 66 (4):579-605.
    Analogies have always had an important place in the reconstruction of past cultures by archaeologists. However, archaeologists and philosophers have objected on various grounds to the importance granted to analogy. Heider proposed the use of multiple analogies--analogies incorporating several sources--as a way of overcoming these objections. However, the merits and even the meaning of this proposal have not been explored adequately. This article presents an examination of instances of multiple analogies in the archaeological literature in order to motivate an adequate (...)
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  18. Cameron Shelley (1999). Preadaptation and the Explanation of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):65-82.
    The concept of preadaptation, though useful, continues to trouble evolutionary scientists. Usually, it is treated as if it were really adaptation, prompting such diverse theorists as Gould and Vrba, and Dennett to suggest its removal from evolutionary theory altogether. In this paper, I argue that the as-if sense is ill-founded, and that the sense of preadaptation as a process may be defended as unequivocal and generally useful in evolutionary explanations, even in such problem areas as human evolution.
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  19. Cameron Shelley (1998). Consciousness, Symbols and Aesthetics: A Just-so Story and its Implications in Susanne Langer's Mind: An Essay on Human Feeling. Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):45 – 66.
    Consciousness is a central theme of Susanne Langer's three-volume work Mind: An essay on human feeling. Langer proposes an evolutionary history of consciousness in order to establish a biological vocabulary for discussing the subject. This vocabulary is based on the qualities of organic processes rather than generic material objects. Her historical scenario and new terminology suggest that Langer views the “cash value” of consciousness in terms of symbolic thinking and aesthetics. This paper provides an overview of Langer's proposed evolutionary scenario (...)
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  20. Cameron Shelley (1996). Visual Abductive Reasoning in Archaeology. Philosophy of Science 63 (2):278-301.
    Biographical studies have shown that visual mental imagery plays a significant role in the conduct of scientific research, particularly in the generation of hypotheses. But the nature of visual mental imagery and its participation in abductive inference is not systematically understood. This paper discusses examples of visual abductive reasoning by archaeologists, analyzing them according to the visual information and the process of inference employed. This work supports the conclusion that visual abduction is useful to scientists under certain conditions and that (...)
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