Search results for 'Candice S. Goad' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Candice S. Goad (2000). Leibniz's Early Views on Matter, Modes, and God. Journal of Philosophical Research 25:261-273.score: 410.0
    Although scholars have often settled upon 1686 as the year in which the central elements of Leibniz’s philosophy first appear in systematic form, certain of his positions appear to have been firmly in place at least ten years earlier. Papers written in 1676 reveal that Leibniz had already by that time established the fundamental feature of his single-substance metaphysics: the insubstantiality of matter. As he defines it, matter is a mode, but a mode of peculiar status, a sort of “top (...)
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  2. Candice Goad (1993). Leibniz and Descartes on Innateness. Southwest Philosophy Review 9 (1):77-89.score: 120.0
  3. Candice Goad & Susanna Goodin (1997). Monadic Hierarchies and the Great Chain of Being. Studia Leibnitiana 29 (2):129-145.score: 120.0
     
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  4. Linda Goad (1990). Problem-Solving in Eutrophication The Control of Eutrophication of Lakes and Reservoirs S.-O. Ryding W. Rast. Bioscience 40 (11):847-848.score: 120.0
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  5. Hoke Robinson (1993). Innateness in Descartes and Leibniz, Comments on Candice Goad's “Leibniz and Descartes on Innateness”. Southwest Philosophy Review 9 (2):121-124.score: 81.0
  6. Peter Thielke (2001). Getting Maimon's Goad: Discursivity, Skepticism, and Fichte's Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):101-134.score: 42.0
  7. Richard Foley (2008). Plato's Undividable Line: Contradiction and Method In. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1).score: 21.0
    : Plato’s instructions entail that the line of Republic VI is divided so that the middle two segments are of equal length. Yet I argue that Plato’s elaboration of the significance of this analogy shows he believes that these segments are of unequal length because the domains they represent are not of equally clear mental states, nor perhaps of objects of equal reality. I label this inconsistency between Plato’s instructions and his explanation the “overdetermination problem.” The overdetermination problem has been (...)
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  8. Philip Cafaro (2004). Fashionable Nihilism: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):257-260.score: 12.0
    Blurb: Thoreau wrote that we have professors of philosophy but no philosophers. Can't we have both? Why doesn't philosophy hold a more central place in our lives? Why should it? Eloquently opposing the analytic thrust of philosophy in academia, noted pluralist philosopher Bruce Wilshire answers these questions and more in an effort to make philosophy more meaningful to our everyday lives. Writing in an accessible style he resurrects classic yet neglected forms of inquiring and communicating. In a series of personal (...)
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  9. Gary Lutz (2010). THIS IS NICE OF YOU. Introduction by Ben Segal. Continent 1 (1):43-51.score: 12.0
    Reproduced with the kind permission of the author. Currently available in the collection I Looked Alive . © 2010 The Brooklyn Rail/Black Square Editions | ISBN 978-1934029-07-7 Originally published 2003 Four Walls Eight Windows. continent. 1.1 (2011): 43-51. Introduction Ben Segal What interests me is instigated language, language dishabituated from its ordinary doings, language startled by itself. I don't know where that sort of interest locates me, or leaves me, but a lot of the books I see in the stores (...)
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  10. Felipe W. Martinez, Nancy Fumero & Ben Segal (2013). Grande Sertão: Veredas by João Guimarães Rosa. Continent 3 (1):27-43.score: 12.0
    INTRODUCTION BY NANCY FUMERO What is a translation that stalls comprehension? That, when read, parsed, obfuscates comprehension through any language – English, Portuguese. It is inevitable that readers expect fidelity from translations. That language mirror with a sort of precision that enables the reader to become of another location, condition, to grasp in English in a similar vein as readers of Portuguese might from João Guimarães Rosa’s GRANDE SERTÃO: VEREDAS. There is the expectation that translations enable mobility. That what was (...)
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  11. James Lindemann Nelson (1992). Making Peace in Gestational Conflicts. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (4).score: 12.0
    Mary Anne Warren's claim that there is room for only one person with full and equal rights inside a single human skin ([1], p. 63) calls attention to the vast range of moral conflict engendered by assigning full basic moral rights to fetuses. Thereby, it serves as a goad to thinking about conflicts between pregnant women and their fetuses in a way that emphasizes relationships rather than rights. I sketch out what a care orientation might suggest about resolving gestational (...)
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  12. Jonathan Lavery (2005). Reflection and Exhortation in Butler's Sermons: Practical Deliberation, Psychological Health and the Philosophical Sermon. The European Legacy 10 (4):329-348.score: 7.0
    I begin by noting the disparate legacies of Thomas Hobbes (1588?1679) and Bishop Joseph Butler (1692?1752). I suggest that part of the reason Butler's arguments in Fifteen Sermons Preached at Rolls Chapel (2nd ed. 1729) have been comparatively neglected by contemporary philosophers is due to the genre in which they are presented, i.e. the sermon. Like other non-standard genres of philosophical writing (dialogue, disputatio, meditation, etc.) both the genre and the purpose towards which Butler puts it have become unfashionable in (...)
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  13. Luca Ferrero (forthcoming). Decisions, Diachronic Autonomy, and the Division of Deliberative Labor. Philosophers' Imprint.score: 4.0
    1.1 A distinctive feature of our agency is the ability to bind our future conduct by making future-directed decisions. The bond of decisions is not one of mere physical constraint. A decision is not the trigger of some mechanism that takes control of the agent at the future time f and physically forces her to φ. When the agent φ’s out of her past decision to do so, she is in rational control of her conduct at the time of action.1 (...)
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  14. Robert C. Solomon (2003). Living with Nietzsche: What the Great "Immoralist" has to Teach Us. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the most popular and controversial philosophers of the last 150 years. Narcissistic, idiosyncratic, hyperbolic, irreverent--never has a philosopher been appropriated, deconstructed, and scrutinized by such a disparate array of groups, movements, and schools of thought. Adored by many for his passionate ideas and iconoclastic style, he is also vilified for his lack of rigor, apparent cruelty, and disdain for moral decency. In Living with Nietzsche, Solomon suggests that we read Nietzsche from a very different point (...)
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  15. Edward F. McClennen (1999). Moral Rules as Public Goods. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):103-126.score: 4.0
    The kind of commitment to moral rules that characterizes effective interaction between persons in, among others places,manufacturing and commercial settings is characteristically treated by economists and game theorists as a public good, the securing ofwhich requires the expenditure of scarce resources on surveillance and enforcement mechanisms. Alternatively put, the view is that,characteristically, rational persons cannot voluntarily guide their choices by rules, but can only be goaded into acting in accordancewith such rules by the fear of social and formal sanctions. On (...)
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  16. Vincent Colapietro (2008). Peircean Semeiotic and Legal Practices: Rudimentary and “Rhetorical” Considerations. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (3):223-246.score: 4.0
    Too often C. S. Peirce’s theory of signs is used simply as a classificatory scheme rather than primarily as a heuristic framework (that is, a framework designed and modified primarily for the purpose of goading and guiding inquiry in any field in which signifying processes or practices are present). Such deployment of his semeiotic betrays the letter no less than the spirit of Peirce’s writings on signs. In this essay, the author accordingly presents Peirce’s sign theory as a heuristic framework, (...)
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