Search results for 'Capabilities approach' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alexander Bertland (2009). Virtue Ethics in Business and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):25 - 32.score: 90.0
    Recently, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have developed the capabilities approach to provide a model for understanding the effectiveness of programs to help the developing nations. The approach holds that human beings are fundamentally free and have a sense of human dignity. Therefore, institutions need to help people enhance this dignity by providing them with the opportunity to develop their capabilities freely. I argue that this approach may help support business ethics based on virtue. Since (...)
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  2. Ramona Ilea (2008). Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach and Nonhuman Animals: Theory and Public Policy. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):547-563.score: 90.0
    In this paper, I assess Martha Nussbaum's application of the capabilities approach to non-human animals for both its philosophical merits and its potential to affect public policy. I argue that there are currently three main philosophical problems with the theory that need further attention. After discussing these problems, I show how focusing on factory farming would enable Nussbaum to demonstrate the philosophical merits of the capabilities approach as well as to suggest more powerful and effectives changes (...)
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  3. Cecile Renouard (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility, Utilitarianism, and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):85 - 97.score: 90.0
    This article explores the possible convergence between the capabilities approach and utilitarianism to specify CSR. It defends the idea that this key issue is related to the anthropological perspective that underpins both theories and demonstrates that a relational conception of individual freedoms and rights present in both traditions gives adequate criteria for CSR toward the company's stakeholders. I therefore defend "relational capability" as a means of providing a common paradigm, a shared vision of a core component of human (...)
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  4. Paul Formosa & Catriona Mackenzie (forthcoming). Nussbaum, Kant, and the Capabilities Approach to Dignity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.score: 78.0
    The concept of dignity plays a foundational role in the more recent versions of Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities theory. However, despite its centrality to her theory, Nussbaum’s conception of dignity remains under-theorised. In this paper we critically examine the role that dignity plays in Nussbaum’s theory by, first, developing an account of the concept of dignity and introducing a distinction between two types of dignity, status dignity and achievement dignity. Next, drawing on this account, we analyse Nussbaum’s conception of dignity (...)
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  5. Colleen Murphy & Paolo Gardoni (2007). Determining Public Policy and Resource Allocation Priorities for Mitigating Natural Hazards: A Capabilities-Based Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):489-504.score: 72.0
    This paper proposes a Capabilities-based Approach to guide hazard mitigation efforts. First, a discussion is provided of the criteria that should be met by an adequate framework for formulating public policy and allocating resources. This paper shows why a common decision-aiding tool, Cost-benefit Analysis, fails to fulfill such criteria. A Capabilities-based Approach to hazard mitigation is then presented, drawing on the framework originally developed in the context of development economics and policy. The focus of a (...)-based Approach is protecting and promoting the well-being of individuals. Capabilities are dimensions of well-being and specified in terms of functionings. Functionings capture the various things of value an individual does or becomes in his or her life, including being alive, being healthy, and being sheltered. Capabilities refer to the real achievability of specific functionings. In the context of hazard mitigation, from a Capabilities-based Approach, decision- and policy-makers should consider the acceptability and tolerability of risks along with the affectability of hazards when determining policy formulation and resource allocation. Finally, the paper shows how the proposed approach satisfies the required criteria, and overcomes the limitations of Cost-benefit Analysis, while maintaining its strengths. (shrink)
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  6. Colleen Murphy & Paolo Gardoni (2008). The Acceptability and the Tolerability of Societal Risks: A Capabilities-Based Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):77-92.score: 72.0
    In this paper, we present a Capabilities-based Approach to the acceptability and the tolerability of risks posed by natural and man-made hazards. We argue that judgments about the acceptability and/or tolerability of such risks should be based on an evaluation of the likely societal impact of potential hazards, defined in terms of the expected changes in the capabilities of individuals. Capabilities refer to the functionings, or valuable doings and beings, individuals are able to achieve given available (...)
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  7. Yingqin Zheng & Bernd Carsten Stahl (2011). Technology, Capabilities and Critical Perspectives: What Can Critical Theory Contribute to Sen's Capability Approach? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):69-80.score: 72.0
    This paper explores what insights can be drawn from critical theory to enrich and strengthen Sen’s capability approach in relation to technology and human development. The two theories share some important commonalities: both are concerned with the pursuit of “a good life”; both are normative theories rooted in ethics and meant to make a difference, and both are interested in democracy. The paper provides a brief overview of both schools of thought and their applications to technology and human development. (...)
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  8. Elizabeth Cripps (2010). Saving the Polar Bear, Saving the World: Can the Capabilities Approach Do Justice to Humans, Animals and Ecosystems? [REVIEW] Res Publica 16 (1):1-22.score: 66.0
    Martha Nussbaum has expanded the capabilities approach to defend positive duties of justice to individuals who fall below Rawls’ standard for fully cooperating members of society, including sentient nonhuman animals. Building on this, David Schlosberg has defended the extension of capabilities justice not only to individual animals but also to entire species and ecosystems. This is an attractive vision: a happy marriage of social, environmental and ecological justice, which also respects the claims of individual animals. This paper (...)
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  9. Linda Barclay (2012). Natural Deficiency or Social Oppression? The Capabilities Approach to Justice for People with Disabilities. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):500-520.score: 66.0
    Theories of distributive justice are often criticised for either excluding people with disabilities from the domain of justice altogether, or casting them as deficient in personal attributes. I argue that the capabilities approach to justice is largely immune to these flaws. It has the conceptual resources to locate most of the causes of disadvantage in the interaction between a person and her environment and in doing so can characterise the disadvantages of disability in a way that avoids the (...)
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  10. Melanie Walker (2003). Framing Social Justice in Education: What Does the 'Capabilities' Approach Offer? British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (2):168 - 187.score: 66.0
    This paper develops a framework for conceptualising social justice in education, drawing particularly on Martha Nussbaum's (2000) capabilities approach. The practical case for consideration is that of widening participation and pedagogical implications in higher (university) education in England. While the paper supports the value and usefulness of Nussbaum's list of ten capabilities for developing a more radical and challenging language and practice for higher education pedagogies, it also argues that her approach is limited. Other ways of (...)
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  11. Wouter Peeters, Jo Dirix & Sigrid Sterckx (forthcoming). Towards an Integration of the Ecological Space Paradigm and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-18.score: 66.0
    In order to develop a model of equitable and sustainable distribution, this paper advocates integrating the ecological space paradigm and the capabilities approach. As the currency of distribution, this account proposes a hybrid of capabilities and ecological space. Although the goal of distributive justice should be to secure and promote people’s capabilities now and in the future, doing so requires acknowledging that these capabilities are dependent on the biophysical preconditions as well as inculcating the ethos (...)
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  12. Thom Brooks, The Capabilities Approach, Religious Practices, and the Importance of Recognition.score: 60.0
    When can ever be justified in banning a religious practice? This paper focusses on Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach. Certain religious practices create a clash between capabilities where the capability to religious belief and expression is in conflict with the capability of equal status and nondiscrimination. One example of such a clash is the case of polygamy. Nussbaum argues that there may be circumstances where polygamy may be acceptable. On the contrary, I argue that the capabilities (...) cannot justify polygamy in any circumstance. Her approach rules out polygamy, but may not rule out all non-monogamous relationships, such as polyamory. Finally, I conclude that the capabilities approach would benefit from a more robust understanding of recognition. (shrink)
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  13. J. Thompson (2002). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (1):111 – 113.score: 60.0
    Book Information Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. By Martha C. Nussbaum. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge/New York. 2000. Pp. xxi + 312.
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  14. Luara Ferracioli & Rosa Terlazzo (2014). Educating for Autonomy: Liberalism and Autonomy in the Capabilities Approach. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):443-455.score: 60.0
    Martha Nussbaum grounds her version of the capabilities approach in political liberalism. In this paper, we argue that the capabilities approach, insofar as it genuinely values the things that persons can actually do and be, must be grounded in a hybrid account of liberalism: in order to show respect for adults, its justification must be political; in order to show respect for children, however, its implementation must include a commitment to comprehensive autonomy, one that ensures that (...)
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  15. J. Felix Lozano, Alejandra Boni, Jordi Peris & Andrés Hueso (2012). Competencies in Higher Education: A Critical Analysis From the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (1):132-147.score: 60.0
    With the creation of the European Higher Education Area, universities are undergoing a significant transformation that is leading towards a new teaching and learning paradigm. The competencies approach has a key role in this process. But we believe that the competence approach has a number of limitations and weaknesses that can be overcome and supplanted by the capabilities approach. In this article our objective is twofold: first, make a critical analysis of the concept of competence as (...)
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  16. Katy Fulfer (2013). The Capabilities Approach to Justice and the Flourishing of Nonsentient Life. Ethics and the Environment 18 (1):19-38.score: 60.0
    According to Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities approach (CA) to justice, a (liberal) society is just if it provides people with the means to actualize basic capabilities that are necessary for a dignified human life. In Frontiers of Justice, Nussbaum (2006) expands the CA to include sentient nonhuman animals in the sphere of justice (as opposed, for instance, to the sphere of compassion). As it does for humans, justice requires that sentient creatures have the ability to access capabilities (...)
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  17. Yuko Kamishima (2008). Can Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach Be a Foundation of Politically Liberal Theory of Justice? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:293-298.score: 60.0
    With our state-guaranteed or internationally recognized human rights, liberalism is rather a common basis of political discussion today. John Rawls’s theory of justice, which set a framework for liberal theory of justice in the last decades of the twentieth century, is notably contractarian. Martha Nussbaum, although claiming to be a neo-Aristotelian, argues that her capabilities approach (hereafter CA) can upgrade the liberal theory of justice, particularly that of political liberalism, to deal with unsolved problems of justice, namely, disability, (...)
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  18. Veronica Vasterling (2008). Martha Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:823-835.score: 60.0
    Throughout the 1990-ies Nussbaum, in collaboration with others, has elaborated and argued for a list of human capabilities which specifies necessary conditions of human flourishing. The capabilities approach has been enormously influential in putting issues of global development and justice, and especially justice for women, on the philosophical and political agenda. Moreover, many international agencies and institutions, including the United Nations Development Program, have started to make use of this approach. Despite of its obvious good intentions (...)
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  19. R. Terlazzo (2009). Progressive Politics: Liberalism, Humanism, and Feminism in Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach. South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (2).score: 60.0
    A purely theoretical analysis of Martha Nussbaum’s basis of the capabilities approach in feminist (rather than more broadly liberal humanist) justice yields a philosophical project that may appear inconsistent, if not incoherent. However, I suggest in this paper that when the reader considers the project’s very concrete aims, there surfaces an intelligible reason for the apparent incongruities between her feminist and liberal commitments. Since even a capabilities approach rooted in feminist justice is itself radical and must (...)
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  20. Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt (2013). Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):29-39.score: 60.0
    Health services internationally struggle to ensure health care is ?person-centered? (or similar). In part, this is because there are many interpretations of ?person-centered care? (and near synonyms), some of which seem unrealistic for some patients or situations and obscure the intrinsic value of patients? experiences of health care delivery. The general concern behind calls for person-centered care is an ethical one: Patients should be ?treated as persons.? We made novel use of insights from the capabilities approach to characterize (...)
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  21. Caroline Harnacke (2013). Disability and Capability: Exploring the Usefulness of Martha Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach for the UN Disability Rights Convention. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):768-780.score: 60.0
    I explore the usefulness of Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach in regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The CRPD aims at empowering people with disabilities by granting them a number of civil and political, but also economic, social and cultural rights. Implementing the CRPD will clearly be politically challenging and also very expensive for states. Thus, questions might arise as to whether the requirements set in the CRPD can be justified from an (...)
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  22. Sridhar Venkatapuram (2013). Health, Vital Goals, and Central Human Capabilities. Bioethics 27 (5):271-279.score: 54.0
    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I (...)
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  23. Lieske Voget-Kleschin (forthcoming). Reasoning Claims for More Sustainable Food Consumption: A Capabilities Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-23.score: 54.0
    This paper examines how employing the capabilities approach in conceptualizing sustainable development allows reasoning and specifying claims for more sustainable lifestyles. In doing so, it focuses on the example of food consumption because it constitutes an ‘(un)sustainability hotspot’ as well as a paradigmatic example for the tensions between individual lifestyles on the one hand and societal consequences of such lifestyles on the other. The arguments developed in the paper allow rebutting two common objections against claims for individual changes (...)
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  24. Robert F. Garnett (2009). Liberal Learning as Freedom: A Capabilities Approach to Undergraduate Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (5):437-447.score: 51.0
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  25. Donna Vaughan (2011). The Importance of Capabilities in the Sustainability of Information and Communications Technology Programs: The Case of Remote Indigenous Australian Communities. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):131-150.score: 50.0
    The use of the capability approach as an evaluative tool for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) policy and programs in developing countries, in particular at a grass-roots community level, is an emerging field of application. However, one of the difficulties with ICT for development (ICT4D) evaluations is in linking what is often no more than a resource, for example basic access, to actual outcomes, or means to end. This article argues that the capability approach provides a framework for (...)
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  26. Jay Drydyk (2012). A Capability Approach to Justice as a Virtue. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):23-38.score: 48.0
    In The Idea of Justice , Amartya Sen argues for an approach to justice that is comparative and realization-based rather than transcendental and institutional. While Sen’s arguments for such an approach may not be as convincing as he thought, there are additional arguments for it, and one is that it provides a unique and valuable platform on which an account of justice as a virtue of social and political actors (including institutions and social movements) can be built. Hence (...)
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  27. Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.score: 48.0
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its emphasis on freedom of (...)
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  28. Eranda Jayawickreme & James O. Pawelski (2012). Positivity and the Capabilities Approach. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):383-400.score: 48.0
    We evaluate the suitability of Nussbaum's substantive account of capabilities in light of conceptual and empirical work that has shown that positivity is widely valued and pursued as an end by many people, and evidence that positive outcomes, even economic ones, are often caused by well-being rather than the other way around. While Nussbaum sees positive emotions as incidental to the experience of well-being, we argue that the experience of such mental states is partly constitutive of flourishing.
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  29. Yvette Pearson & Jason Borenstein (2013). The Intervention of Robot Caregivers and the Cultivation of Children's Capability to Play. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):123-137.score: 48.0
    In this article, the authors examine whether and how robot caregivers can contribute to the welfare of children with various cognitive and physical impairments by expanding recreational opportunities for these children. The capabilities approach is used as a basis for informing the relevant discussion. Though important in its own right, having the opportunity to play is essential to the development of other capabilities central to human flourishing. Drawing from empirical studies, the authors show that the use of (...)
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  30. Colleen Murphy Æ Paolo Gardoni, The Acceptability and the Tolerability of Societal Risks: A Capabilities-Based Approach.score: 48.0
    In this paper, we present a Capabilities-based Approach to the acceptability and the tolerability of risks posed by natural and man-made hazards. We argue that judgments about the acceptability and/or tolerability of such risks should be based on an evaluation of the likely societal impact of potential hazards, defined in terms of the expected changes in the capabilities of individuals. Capabilities refer to the functionings, or valuable doings and beings, individuals are able to achieve given available (...)
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  31. Martha Nussbaum (2001). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    Only a broad concern for functioning and capability can do justice to the complex interrelationships between human striving and its material and social context. IV. CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES The most interesting worries about ...
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  32. Helena Grunfeld, Sokleap Hak & Tara Pin (2011). Understanding Benefits Realisation of iREACH From a Capability Approach Perspective. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):151-172.score: 48.0
    The research presented in this paper is the first wave of a longitudinal study of a Cambodian information and communication for development (ICT4D) project, iREACH, aimed at testing a framework for evaluating whether and how such initiatives can contribute to capabilities, empowerment and sustainability. The framework is informed by Amartya Sen’s capability approach (CA), uses a participatory methodology, considers the micro-, meso-, and macro- levels in understanding the role ICT can play in the development process, and adopts a (...)
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  33. Agni Kalfagianni (2013). Addressing the Global Sustainability Challenge: The Potential and Pitfalls of Private Governance From the Perspective of Human Capabilities. Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 46.0
    Contemporary global politics is characterized by an increasing trend toward experimental forms of governance, with an emphasis on private governance. A plurality of private standards, codes of conduct and quality assurance schemes currently developed particularly, though not exclusively, by TNCs replace traditional intergovernmental regimes in addressing profound global environmental and socio-economic challenges ranging from forest deforestation, fisheries depletion, climate change, to labor and human rights concerns. While this trend has produced a heated debate in science and politics, surprisingly little attention (...)
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  34. Anne Phillips (2002). Martha C. Nussbaum, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach:Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Ethics 112 (2):398-403.score: 45.0
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  35. Phillip McReynolds (2002). Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach: A Pragmatist Critique. [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (2):142 - 150.score: 45.0
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  36. Thom Brooks (2011). Respect for Nature: The Capabilities Approach. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):143 - 146.score: 45.0
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 143-146, June 2011.
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  37. Yvette Pearson (2010). Robot Caregivers: Harbingers of Expanded Freedom for All? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):277-288.score: 45.0
    As we near a time when robots may serve a vital function by becoming caregivers, it is important to examine the ethical implications of this development. By applying the capabilities approach as a guide to both the design and use of robot caregivers, we hope that this will maximize opportunities to preserve or expand freedom for care recipients. We think the use of the capabilities approach will be especially valuable for improving the ability of impaired persons (...)
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  38. R. Kamtekar (2002). Sex and Social Justice; Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Philosophical Review 111 (2):262-270.score: 45.0
  39. Keith Cash (2001). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Nursing Philosophy 2 (1):92-94.score: 45.0
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  40. Tony DeCesare (2014). Theorizing Democratic Education From a Senian Perspective. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (2):149-170.score: 45.0
    Despite the growing body of literature and general interest in the intersection between the capabilities approach (CA) and education, little work has been done so far to theorize democratic education from a CA perspective. This essay attempts to do so by, first, getting clear about the theory of democracy that has emerged from Amartya Sen’s recent work and understanding how it informs his CA; and, second, by carefully drawing out the implications of these aspects of Sen’s thinking for (...)
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  41. Melanie Walker (2006). Higher Education Pedagogies: A Capabilities Approach. Open University Press.score: 45.0
    This book sets out to generate new ways of reflecting ethically about the purposes and values of contemporary higher education in relation to agency, learning, public values and democratic life, and the pedagogies which support these.
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  42. Daniel Takarabe Kim (2013). Sridhar Venkatapuram: Health Justice: An Argument From the Capabilities Approach. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):511-515.score: 45.0
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  43. Nelarine Cornelius & James Wallace (2010). Cross-Sector Partnerships: City Regeneration and Social Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):71 - 84.score: 45.0
    In this article, the ability of partnerships to generate goods that enhance the quality-of-life of socially and economically deprived urban communities is explored. Drawing on Rawl's study on social justice [Rawls, J.: 1971, A Theory of Justice (Harvard University Press, Cambridge)] and Sen's capabilities approach [Sen, A.: 1992, Inequality Re-Examined (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA); 1999, Development as Freedom (Oxford University Press, Oxford); 2009, The Idea of Justice (Ellen Lane, London)], we undertake an ethical evaluation of the effectiveness (...)
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  44. Daniel Crescenzo (2012). The Problem of Predator-Prey Relations and Predator Flourishing in Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach to Justice. Environmental Ethics 34 (2):177-197.score: 45.0
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  45. Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt (2013). A Capabilities Approach to Person-Centered Care: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care”. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):W1 - W4.score: 45.0
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  46. Laura Capitaine, Guido Pennings & Sigrid Sterckx (2013). Why Jecker's Capabilities Approach to Age-Based Rationing Is Incapable of Containing Health Care Costs. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):22-23.score: 45.0
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  47. Jesús Conill (2013). The Philosophical Foundations of the Capabilities Approach. In. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. 661--674.score: 45.0
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  48. Julie Custeau (2002). Martha C. Nussbaum, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (5):349-351.score: 45.0
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  49. Martha Nussbaum (2011). The Capabilities Approach and Ethical Cosmopolitanism: The Challenge of Political Liberalism1. In Maria Rovisco & Magdalena Nowicka (eds.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Cosmopolitanism. Ashgate. 403.score: 45.0
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  50. A. J. Pritchard (2012). Health, Power, Justice and Truth. Review of Venkatapuram, S. Health Justice: An Argument From the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1116-1118.score: 45.0
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