Search results for 'Capitalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ali M. Rizvi (2012). Biopower, Governmentality, and Capitalism Through the Lenses of Freedom: A Conceptual Enquiry. Pakistan Business Review 14 (3):490-517.score: 18.0
    In this paper I propose a framework to understand the transition in Foucault’s work from the disciplinary model to the governmentality model. Foucault’s work on power emerges within the general context of an expression of capitalist rationality and the nature of freedom and power within it. I argue that, thus understood, Foucault’s transition to the governmentality model can be seen simultaneously as a deepening recognition of what capitalism is and how it works, but also as a recognition of the (...)
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  2. Ali Rizvi (2006). FOUCAULT AND CAPITALIST RATIONALITY: A RECONSTRUCTION. Market Forces 1 (4):23-33.score: 18.0
    The relation between the regimes of the accumulation of men and the accumulation of capital is problematised in the works of Michel Foucault. The paper challenges the prevailing wisdom that the relation between these regimes is contingent. The fundamental question of the conditions of the possibility of relation between the two regimes is raised. It is argued that both regimes are primordially related. Focusing on the Foucauldian analysis of the regime of the accumulation of men and its constituent elements an (...)
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  3. R. Edward Freeman, Kirsten Martin & Bidhan Parmar (2007). Stakeholder Capitalism. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):303 - 314.score: 18.0
    In this article, we will outline the principles of stakeholder capitalism and describe how this view rejects problematic assumptions in the current narratives of capitalism. Traditional narratives of capitalism rely upon the assumptions of competition, limited resources, and a winner-take-all mentality as fundamental to business and economic activity. These approaches leave little room for ethical analysis, have a simplistic view of human beings, and focus on value-capture rather than value-creation. We argue these assumptions about capitalism are (...)
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  4. Philippe van Parijs (1995). Real Freedom for All: What (If Anything) Can Justify Capitalism? Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Capitalist societies are full of unacceptable inequalities. Freedom is of paramount importance. These two convictions, widely shared around the world, seem to be in direct contradiction with each other. Fighting inequality jeopardizes freedom, and taking freedom seriously boosts inequality. Can this conflict be resolved? In this ground-breaking book, Philippe Van Parijs sets a new and compelling case for a just society. Assessing and rejecting the claims of both socialism and conventional capitalism, he presents a clear and compelling alternative vision (...)
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  5. Ingerid S. Straume & J. F. Humphrey (eds.) (2011). Depoliticization. The Political Imaginary of Global Capitalism. NSU Press.score: 18.0
    Depoliticization: The Political Imaginary of Global Capitalism follows in the path blazed by Hannah Arendt and Cornelius Castoriadis, where politics is seen as a mode of freedom; the possibility for individuals to consciously and explicitly create the institutions of their own societies. Starting with such problem as: What is capital? How can we characterize the dominant economic system? What are the conditions for its existence, and how can we create alternatives?, the articles examine the central institutions of modern Western (...)
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  6. Dennis R. Cooley (2009). Understanding Social Welfare Capitalism, Private Property, and the Government's Duty to Create a Sustainable Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):351-369.score: 18.0
    No one would deny that sustainability is necessary for individual, business, and national survival. How this goal is to be accomplished is a matter of great debate. In this article I will show that the United States and other developed countries have a duty to create sustainable cities, even if that is against a notion of private property rights considered as an absolute. Through eminent domain and regulation, developed countries can fulfill their obligations to current and future generations. To do (...)
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  7. Edward J. Romar (2009). Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek's Free Market Capitalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57 - 66.score: 18.0
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek’s political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently (...)
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  8. Kenneth Amaeshi & Olufemi O. Amao (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility in Transnational Speces: Exploring Influences of Varieties of Capitalism on Expressions of Corporate Codes of Conduct in Nigeria. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):225 - 239.score: 18.0
    Drawing from the varieties of capitalism theoretical framework, the study explores the home country influences of multinational corporations (MNCs) on their corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices when they operate outside their national/regional institutional contexts. The study focusses on a particular CSR practice (i.e. corporate expressions of code of conducts) of seven MNCs from three varieties of capitalism – coordinated (2), mixed (2) and liberal (3) market economies – operating in the oil and gas sector of the Nigerian economy. (...)
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  9. M. J. S. Hodge (2009). Capitalist Contexts for Darwinian Theory: Land, Finance, Industry and Empire. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (3):399 - 416.score: 18.0
    When socio-economic contexts are sought for Darwin's science, it is customary to turn to the Industrial Revolution. However, important issues about the long run of England's capitalisms can only be recognised by taking a wider view than Industrial Revolution historiographies tend to engage. The role of land and finance capitalisms in the development of the empire is one such issue. If we historians of Darwin's science allow ourselves a distinction between land and finance capitalisms on the one hand and industrial (...)
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  10. Scott L. Newbert (2003). Realizing the Spirit and Impact of Adam Smith's Capitalism Through Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):251 - 261.score: 18.0
    Adam Smith argued in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments that in order to create an effective and productive capitalist system, individuals must pursue interests of both the self and society. Despite this assertion, modern economic theory has become tightly focused on the pursuit of economic self-interests at the expense of other, higher order motives. This paper will argue that the tendency to employ such an egocentric strategy often generates externalities and inequalities that serve to (...)
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  11. Sherwin Klein (2003). The Natural Roots of Capitalism and Its Virtues and Values. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (4):387 - 401.score: 18.0
    When we think of theories that attempt to root capitalism in nature, the one that comes most readily to mind is Social Darwinism. In this theory, nature - driven by Darwinian natural selection (the struggle for existence and the survival of the fittest) - is interpreted to imply, when applied to human activities, that extreme competition will allow the most "fit" competitors to rise to the top and to survive in this "struggle for existence," and this process of dog-eat-dog (...)
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  12. Carlo Vercellone (2007). From Formal Subsumption to General Intellect: Elements for a Marxist Reading of the Thesis of Cognitive Capitalism. Historical Materialism 15 (1):13-36.score: 18.0
    Since the crisis of Fordism, capitalism has been characterised by the ever more central role of knowledge and the rise of the cognitive dimensions of labour. This is not to say that the centrality of knowledge to capitalism is new per se. Rather, the question we must ask is to what extent we can speak of a new role for knowledge and, more importantly, its relationship with transformations in the capital/labour relation. From this perspective, the paper highlights the (...)
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  13. Po-Keung Ip (2008). Corporate Social Responsibility and Crony Capitalism in Taiwan. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):167 - 177.score: 18.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become increasingly popular in advanced economies in the West. In contrast, CSR awareness in Asia is rather low, both on the corporate and state level. However, recent events have shown that the CSR is receiving more attention by corporations in Asia. Recent development in CSR in Taiwan is one example of such a trend. A 2005 survey on the 700 publicly listed companies in Taiwan on␣CSR has highlighted the current CSR situation. Concurrently, the numbers of (...)
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  14. Martin Parker & Gordon Pearson (2005). Capitalism and its Regulation: A Dialogue on Business and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):91 - 101.score: 18.0
    This dialogue engages with the ethics of politics of capitalism, and enacts a debate between two participants who have divergent views on these matters. Beginning with a discussion concerning definitions of capitalism, it moves on to cover issues concerning our different understandings of the costs and benefits of global capitalist systems. This then leads into a debate about the nature and purposes of regulation, in terms of whether regulation is intended to make competition work better for consumers, or (...)
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  15. M. G. Piety (2004). The Long Term: Capitalism and Culture in the New Millennium. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):103-118.score: 18.0
    One of the most significant developments in the latter part of the 20th century and the first part of this new millennium has been the triumph of short-term over long-term thinking. We are increasingly a culture that looks neither to the past nor to the future, but only to the next “quarter,” or to the next Delphic pronouncement by Alan Greenspan. This cultural construction of time has given rise to social, political and personal problems of unprecedented magnitude. The short-term focus (...)
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  16. Julia Resnik (2009). Multicultural Education - Good for Business but Not for the State? The IB Curriculum and Global Capitalism. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (3):217 - 244.score: 18.0
    In the 1970s and the 1980s, multicultural education spread in many countries. However, in the mid-1980s the golden age of multiculturalism came to an end. Neo-conservative political forces attacked multicultural policies and progressively a neo-liberal discourse pervaded economic and social policies, also affecting national education systems. In contrast, multicultural approaches have emerged with tremendous vigour in the field of business management. Juxtaposing cognitive, emotional and socio-communicative multiculturalism found in organisational studies onto multiculturalism in the International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum indicates whether (...)
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  17. Joseph A. Petrick (2011). Sustainable Stakeholder Capitalism: A Moral Vision of Responsible Global Financial Risk Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):93-109.score: 18.0
    The author identifies the major micro-, meso-, and macro-level financial risk shifting factors that contributed to the Great Global Recession and how the absence of a compelling moral vision of responsible financial risk management perpetuated the economic crisis and undermined the recovery by blind reliance upon insufficiently accountable bailouts. The author offers a new theoretical model of Sustainable Stakeholder Capitalism by exercising moral imagination which inclusively and moderately balances four multi-level factors: types of capitalism, moral theories, human nature (...)
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  18. Chris Williams (2010). Ecology and Socialism: [Solutions to Capitalist Ecological Crisis]. Haymarket Books.score: 18.0
    A timely, well-grounded analysis that reveals an inconvenient truth: we can't save capitalism and save the planet.
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  19. Lisbeth Lundahl (2012). Educational Theory in an Era of Knowledge Capitalism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):215-226.score: 18.0
    Two related aspects of the present ‘knowledge capitalism’ stage of globalisation are discussed in this article: the transformation of education to make it more directly supportive of educational growth and competition, and the growing demands on educational research to provide scientific evidence for education policy and practice, using narrowly defined methods and techniques. It is argued that both developments have profound consequences for the construction and use of educational theory, and the vital need for critical discussion and communication in (...)
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  20. Eve Poole (2005). On the Use of Language in the Anti-Capitalist Debate. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):319 - 325.score: 18.0
    The anti-capitalist debate has traditionally drawn up battle lines between oppressed individuals on the one hand, and an oppressive system on the other. While this has high rhetorical value, it is based on imprecise use of language. The language confuses an amoral system with im/moral agents but at the same time uses anthropomorphic language to lend capitalism moral agency. This inevitably leads to a confused debate. Given that all opponents of capitalism want the reformation of what they see (...)
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  21. Bruce J. Berman (1992). Artificial Intelligence and the Ideology of Capitalist Reconstruction. AI and Society 6 (2):103-114.score: 18.0
    The growing interest in AI in advance capitalist societies can be understood not just in relation to its practial achievements, which remain modest, but also in its ideological role as a technological paradign for the reconstruction of capitalism. This is similar to the role played by scientific management during the second industrial revolution, circa 1880–1930, and involves the extension of the rationalization and routinization of labour to mental work. The conception of human intelligence and the emphasis on command and (...)
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  22. Debi Ghate & Richard E. Ralston (eds.) (2011). Why Businessmen Need Philosophy: The Capitalist's Guide to the Ideas Behind Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. New American Library.score: 18.0
    The intellectual tools every business person needs in the boardroom. Includes two rare essays by Ayn Rand! With government and the media blaming big business for the world economic crisis, capitalism needs all the help it can get. It's the perfect time for this collection of essays presenting a philosophical defense of capitalism by Ayn Rand and other Objectivist intellectuals. Essential and practical, Why Businessmen Need Philosophy reveals the importance of maintaining philosophical principles in the corporate environment at (...)
     
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  23. Suman Gupta (2002). Corporate Capitalism and Political Philosophy. Pluto Press.score: 18.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I Philosophical Methods and Capitalist Processes: -- Means, Definitions, Intentions -- 1. The Evasiveness of Corporate Capitalism -- 2. The Political State -- 3. The Capitalist Corporation -- 4. The Contradictions of Capitalism -- 5. Intentional Systems --Part II Reasons, Causes and Practices in Contemporary -- Corporate Capitalism -- 6. Classical Sociology andManagerialism -- 7. Management Discourses -- 8. The Macro Issues Behind Executive Pay -- 9. Corporatism and the Corporate Capitalist State (...)
     
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  24. Black Hawk Hancock & Roberta Garner (2014). Erving Goffman: Theorizing the Self in the Age of Advanced Consumer Capitalism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1).score: 18.0
    The authors argue that Erving Goffman developed concepts that contribute to an understanding of historical changes in the construction of the self and enable us to see the new forms that self-construction is taking in a society driven by consumption, marketing, and media. These concepts include: commercial realism; dramatic scripting; hyper-ritualization; the glimpse; and the dissolution or undermining of the real, the authentic, and the autonomous. By placing Goffman's under-discussed work, Gender Advertisements, in rapprochement with the work of Guy Debord, (...)
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  25. Majia Holmer Nadesan (2011). The Biopolitics of Transactional Capitalism. Mediatropes 3 (1):23-57.score: 18.0
    In the spring of 2010, major newspapers in the U.S. announced arrival of a “recovery” from the economic recession precipitated by the 2008 financial crisis. This essay examines the biopolitics of recovery in the wake of the disaster capitalism of the financial meltdown, arguing that twentieth-century social welfare biopolitics that derived wealth from the populace have been replaced by new forms of financial power whose global circulations and convergences exploit wealth informatically and transactionally, rather than biopolitically, through devices such (...)
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  26. Gabriel Troc (2010). Fredric Jameson, Postmodernism or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):197-205.score: 18.0
    Fredric Jameson, Postmodernism or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism Duke University Press, 1991.
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  27. Shoshana Zuboff (2002). The Support Economy: Why Corporations Are Failing Individuals and the Next Episode of Capitalism. Viking.score: 18.0
    A dazzling blend of business vision, history, social psychology, and economics, The Support Economy starts with a compelling premise: People have changed more than the corporations upon which their well-being depends. In the chasm that now separates the new individuals from the old organizations is the opportunity to forge a capitalism suited to our times and so unleash a vast new potential for wealth creation. In recent years, many books have offered fixes for this crisis, but they have dealt (...)
     
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  28. Michael Löwy (2009). Capitalism as Religion: Walter Benjamin and Max Weber. Historical Materialism 17 (1):60-73.score: 15.0
  29. Leo Panitch (2010). Giovanni Arrighi in Beijing: An Alternative to Capitalism? Historical Materialism 18 (1):74-87.score: 15.0
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  30. David Harvey (2010). The Enigma of Capital: And the Crises of Capitalism. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    The disruption -- Capital assembled -- Capital goes to work -- Capital goes to market -- Capital evolves -- The geography of it all -- Creative destruction on the land -- What is to be done? And who is going to do it?
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  31. Jennifer M. Lehmann (ed.) (2002). Bringing Capitalism Back for Critique by Social Theory. Jai.score: 15.0
    Hardbound. Reflecting the cultural diversity in critical theory, Current Perspectives in Social Theory presents work from a variety of theoretical traditions ...
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  32. Marc Roberts (2007). Capitalism, Psychiatry, and Schizophrenia: A Critical Introduction to Deleuze and Guattari?S Anti-Oedipus. Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):114-127.score: 15.0
  33. Thomas P. Brockelman (2009). Žižek and Heidegger: The Question Concerning Techno-Capitalism. Continuum.score: 15.0
    Fills a genuine gap in iek interpretation - through examining his relationship with Martin Heidegger, the author offers a new and useful overview of iek's work.
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  34. Richard Westra (2009). Firing Back: Against the Tyranny of the Market 2: Global Turbulence: Social Activists' and State Responses to Globalization: Globalization and Inequality: Neoliberalism's Downward Spiral: Anti-Capitalism: A Marxist Introduction. Historical Materialism 17 (2):253-260.score: 15.0
  35. William Robinson (2007). The Pitfalls of Realist Analysis of Global Capitalism: A Critique of Ellen Meiksins Wood's Empire of Capital. Historical Materialism 15 (3):71-93.score: 15.0
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  36. Jan Willem Stutje (2007). Concerning Der Spätkapitalismus: Mandel's Quest for a Synthesis of Late Capitalism. Historical Materialism 15 (1):167-198.score: 15.0
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  37. Lucia Pradella (2013). Imperialism and Capitalist Development in Marx's Capital. Historical Materialism 21 (2):117-147.score: 15.0
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  38. Tony Norfield (2012). Derivatives and Capitalist Markets: The Speculative Heart of Capital. Historical Materialism 20 (1):103-132.score: 15.0
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  39. Marco Solinas (2009). Review of Richard Sennett, The Culture of the New Capitalism. [REVIEW] Humana.Mente 10:151-153.score: 15.0
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  40. H. B. Acton (1972). The Ethics of Capitalism. London,Foundation for Business Responsibilities.score: 15.0
     
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  41. Ana Biresev (2009). Capitalism and Justification. Filozofija I Drustvo 20 (3):223-244.score: 15.0
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  42. Richard A. Brosio (1996). Late Capitalism and Postmodernism: Educational Problems and Possibilities. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (1-2):5-12.score: 15.0
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  43. Manfred S. Frings (1987). Philosophy of Prediction and Capitalism. M. Nijhoff.score: 15.0
     
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  44. Simon Glezos (2012). The Politics of Speed: Capitalism, the State and War in an Accelerating World. Routledge.score: 15.0
     
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  45. Gordon Marshall (1982). In Search of the Spirit of Capitalism: An Essay on Max Weber's Protestant Ethic Thesis. Columbia University Press.score: 15.0
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  46. Ralph Miliband (1969). The State in Capitalist Society. New York, Basic Books.score: 15.0
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  47. Charles Post (2013). The Formative Period of American Capitalism: A Materialist Interpretation, Daniel Gaido, London: Routledge, 2006. Historical Materialism 21 (2):191-195.score: 15.0
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  48. Ronald H. Preston (1979). Religion and the Persistence of Capitalism: The Maurice Lectures for 1977 and Other Studies in Christianity and Social Change. Scm Press.score: 15.0
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  49. Ed Rooksby (2012). Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?, Mark Fisher, Winchester: Zero Books, 2009. Historical Materialism 20 (1):222-231.score: 15.0
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  50. Salterre (2011). The New New Testament: Endgame Capitalism: Observations and Conclusions About the Final Stage in the Evolution of the Capitalist System. Sergio Dezorzi.score: 15.0
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