Search results for 'Caring' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  35
    Nel Noddings (1984). Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education. University of California Press.
    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. Among Those Who helped greatly in the initial stages of this project by making constructive suggestions on my first "caring" papers are Nick Burbules, William Doll, Bruce Fuller, Brian Hill, William Pinar, Mary Anne ...
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  2. Peta Bowden (1997). Caring: Gender-Sensitive Ethics. Routledge.
    Caring extends and challenges recent debates over feminist ethics by taking issue with accounts of the ethics of care which try to pin down the "principles" of caring, rather than understanding the practice of caring. It explores four main caring practices: mothering, friendship, nursing and citizenship. Bowden's consideration of the differences and similarities in these working practices reveals the complexity of the ethics of caring.
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  3.  89
    David W. Shoemaker (2003). Caring, Identification, and Agency. Ethics 114 (1):88-118.
    This paper articulates and defends a noncognitive, care-based view of identification, of what privileged psychic subset provides the source of self-determination in actions and attitudes. The author provides an extended analysis of "caring," and then applies it to debates between Frankfurtians, on the one hand, and Watsonians, on the other, about the nature of identification, then defends the view against objections.
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  4.  13
    Jeffrey Seidman (forthcoming). The Unity of Caring and the Rationality of Emotion. Philosophical Studies:1-17.
    Caring is a complex attitude. At first look, it appears very complex: it seems to involve a wide range of emotional and other dispositions, all focused on the object cared about. What ties these dispositions together, so that they jointly comprise a single attitude? I offer a theory of caring, the Attentional Theory, that answers this question. According to the Attentional Theory, caring consists of just two, logically distinct dispositions: a disposition to attend to an object and (...)
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  5.  83
    Jeffrey Seidman (2009). Valuing and Caring. Theoria 75 (4):272-303.
    What is it to "value" something, in the semi-technical sense of the term that Gary Watson establishes? I argue that valuing something consists in caring about it. Caring involves not only emotional dispositions of the sort that Agnieszka Jaworska has elaborated, but also a distinctive cognitive disposition – namely, a (defeasible) disposition to believe the object cared about to be a source of agent-relative reasons for action and for emotion. Understood in this way, an agent's carings have a (...)
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  6. Riane Eisler & Daniel S. Levine (2002). Nurture, Nature, and Caring: We Are Not Prisoners of Our Genes. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (1):9-52.
    This article develops a theory for how caringbehavior fits into the makeup of humans andother mammals. Biochemical evidence for threemajor patterns of response to stressful orotherwise complex situations is reviewed. There is the classic fight-or-flight response;the dissociative response, involving emotionalwithdrawal and disengagement; and the bondingresponse, a variant of which Taylor et al. (2000) called tend-and-befriend. All three ofthese responses can be explained as adaptationsthat have been selected for in evolution andare shared between humans and other mammals. Yet each of us (...)
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  7.  8
    Betty L. Wells & Shelly Gradwell (2001). Gender and Resource Management: Community Supported Agriculture as Caring-Practice. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):107-119.
    Interviews with Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) growers in Iowa, a majority of whom are women, shed light on the relationship between gender and CSA as a system of resource management. Growers, male and female alike, are differentiated by care and caring-practices. Care-practices, historically associated with women, place priority on local context and relationships. The concern of these growers for community, nature, land, water, soil, and other resources is manifest in care-motives and care-practices. Their specific mix of motives differs: providing (...)
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  8.  35
    Jane Sumner (2010). Reflection and Moral Maturity in a Nurse's Caring Practice: A Critical Perspective. Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):159-169.
    The likelihood of nurse reflection is examined from the theoretical perspectives of Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Action and Sumner's Moral Construct of Caring in Nursing as Communicative Action, through a critical social theory lens. The argument is made that until the nurse reaches the developmental level of post-conventional moral maturity and/or Benner's Stage 5: expert, he or she is not capable of being inwardly directed reflective on self. The three developmental levels of moral maturity and Benner's (...)
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  9.  42
    Nel Noddings (2002). Caring, Social Policy, and Homelessness. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):441-454.
    Care theory offers a way to overcome a weaknessof liberalism – its reluctance to intervene inthe private lives of adults. In caring for thehomeless, we must sometimes use a limited formof coercion, but our intervention is alwaysinteractive, and the process of finding asolution is one of negotiation between theneeds expressed by the homeless and the needswe infer for them.
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  10.  14
    John H. Kultgen (1995). Autonomy and Intervention: Parentalism in the Caring Life. Oxford University Press.
    The basic relationship between people should be care, and the caring life is the highest which humans can live. Unfortunately, care that is not thoughtful slides into illegitimate intrusion on autonomy. Autonomy is a basic good, and we should not abridge it without good reason. On the other hand, it is not the only good. We must sometimes intervene in the lives of others to protect them from grave harms or provide them with important benefits. The reflective person, therefore, (...)
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  11.  9
    Berit Lindahl (2011). Experiences of Exclusion When Living on a Ventilator: Reflections Based on the Application of Julia Kristeva's Philosophy to Caring Science. Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):12-21.
    The research presented in this work represents reflections in the light of Julia Kristeva's philosophy concerning empirical data drawn from research describing the everyday life of people dependent on ventilators. It also presents a qualitative and narrative methodological approach from a person‐centred perspective. Most research on home ventilator treatment is biomedical. There are a few published studies describing the situation of people living at home on a ventilator but no previous publications have used the thoughts in Kristeva's philosophy applied to (...)
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  12.  18
    Anita Lundqvist & Tore Nilstun (2009). Noddings's Caring Ethics Theory Applied in a Paediatric Setting. Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):113-123.
    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. (...)
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  13.  20
    Weihui Fu & Satish P. Deshpande (2013). The Impact of Caring Climate, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment on Job Performance of Employees in a China's Insurance Company. Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):1-11.
    This research uses structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the direct and indirect relationships among caring climate, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job performance of 476 employees working in a Chinese insurance company. The SEM result showed that caring climate had a significant direct impact on job satisfaction, organizational command, and job performance. Caring climate also had a significant indirect impact on organizational commitment through the mediating role of job satisfaction, and on job performance through the mediating (...)
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  14. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and research · the impact of new (...)
     
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  15.  6
    Adrienne S. Chambon & Allan Irving (2003). “They Give Reason a Responsibility Which It Simply Can't Bear”: Ethics, Care of the Self, and Caring Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (3-4):265-278.
    We explore briefly Foucault's ideas about the care of the self, creating ourselves and what he meant by ethics. We then examine the work of five artists–Mark Rothko, Cindy Sherman, Helena Hietanen, Samuel Beckett, and Betty Goodwin–to help us begin to think very differently about illness and human suffering. Taking our lead from Beckett, we regard reason as being given too much responsibility for the work of a caring knowledge, and that it is through the arts that new ideas (...)
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  16.  5
    Louise Anne Mccuaig (2011). Dangerous Carers: Pastoral Power and the Caring Teacher of Contemporary Australian Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):862-877.
    Whilst care imperatives have arisen across the breadth of Western societies, within the education sector they appear both prolific and urgent. This paper explores the deployment of care discourses within education generally and draws upon the case of Australian Health and Physical Education (HPE) more specifically, to undertake a Foucauldian interrogation of care. In so doing I demonstrate the usefulness of Foucault's pastoral power lens and its capacity to provide insight into the moral and ethical work conducted by caring (...)
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  17.  1
    Jo Bridgeman (2007). 'Exceptional' Women, Healthcare Consumers and the Inevitability of Caring. Feminist Legal Studies 15 (2):235-245.
    In Rogers, the Court of Appeal held that the decision of Swindon N.H.S. Primary Care Trust to refuse to fund Herceptin for the treatment of Ann Rogers against breast cancer was irrational. The P.C.T. maintained that their decision was not resource driven but based on the fact that Herceptin was, at that time, not licensed by the European Medicines Agency (E.M.E.A.) for use in early stage breast cancer. Yet it was prepared to fund its use in ‹exceptional circumstances’ which could (...)
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  18. Helga Kuhse (1997). Caring: Nurses, Women, and Ethics. Blackwell Publishers.
  19.  39
    Susan S. Phillips & Patricia E. Benner (eds.) (1994). The Crisis of Care: Affirming and Restoring Caring Practices in the Helping Professions. Georgetown University Press.
    Selected as Outstanding Academic Book by Choice magazine.
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  20.  33
    Hanan Alexander (2013). Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):488-493.
  21.  5
    Gunilla Carlsson, Nancy Drew, Karin Dahlberg & Kim Lützen (2002). Uncovering Tacit Caring Knowledge. Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):144-151.
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  22.  3
    Evridiki Papastavrou, Chrysoula Karlou, Haritini Tsangari, Georgios Efstathiou, Valmi D. Sousa, Anastasios Merkouris & Elisabeth Patiraki (2011). Cross‐Cultural Validation and Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Caring Behaviors Inventory: A Methodological Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):435-443.
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  23. Marilyn J. Mason (1997). Seven Mountains: The Inner Climb to Commitment and Caring. Dutton.
     
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  24. Arthur Olsen (ed.) (1999). The Call to Care: Dimensions, Dilemmas, and Directions of Caring. Ex Machina Publishing.
     
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  25. Nel Noddings, Kelly Oliver, Cynthia Willet & Sonia Kruks (2003). Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy. Political Theory 31 (6):859-870.
    Nel Noddings, one of the central figures in the contemporary discussion of ethics and moral education, argues that caring--a way of life learned at home--can be extended into a theory that guides social policy. Tackling issues such as capital punishment, drug treatment, homelessness, mental illness, and abortion, Noddings inverts traditional philosophical priorities to show how an ethic of care can have profound and compelling implications for social and political thought. Instead of beginning with an ideal state and then describing (...)
     
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  26. Eva Feder Kittay (2013). Caring for the Long Haul: Long-Term Care Needs and the (Moral) Failure to Acknowledge Them. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):66-88.
    As the mother of a daughter who has and will always require care to meet her most basic needs, I have seen firsthand how critical it is to have adequate means by which to meet those needs—for her sake, mine, and my family’s. Her flourishing life has contributed to enhancing not only our own, but those of all who care for her and who enter our lives. I have wanted to see us do better by all the families who struggle (...)
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  27. Carol Levine (2013). What Do Care Recipients Owe Their Caregivers?: Commentary on Eva Feder Kittay's "Caring for the Long Haul". International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):89-93.
    Eva Feder Kittay combines a philosopher’s appeal to logic and an advocate’s call for action. Over the years she has written cogently about theories of caregiving and dependence, shared her experiences as a parent of a disabled child, and now adds what she has learned about caring for elderly relatives. In this commentary I want to clarify a few points in her far-ranging essay. I also want to suggest broadening her focus on paying for long-term care to include reforming (...)
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  28.  53
    Joan Tronto (2010). Creating Caring Institutions: Politics, Plurality, and Purpose. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (2):158-171.
    How do we know which institutions provide good care? Some scholars argue that the best way to think about care institutions is to model them upon the family or the market. This paper argues, on the contrary, that when we make explicit some background conditions of good family care, we can apply what we know to better institutionalized caring. After considering elements of bad and good care, from an institutional perspective, the paper argues that good care in an institutional (...)
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  29.  88
    Agnieszka Jaworska (2007). Caring and Internality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (3):529-568.
    In his work on internality, identification, and caring, Harry Frankfurt attempts to delineate the organization of agency peculiar to human beings, while avoiding the traditional overintellectualized emphasis on the human capacity to reason about action. The focal point of Frankfurt’s alternative picture is our capacity to make our own motivation the object of reflection. Building upon the observation that marginal agents (such as young children and Alzheimer’s patients) are capable of caring, I show that neither caring nor (...)
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  30. Nel Noddings (2013). Caring: A Relational Approach to Ethics and Moral Education. University of California Press.
    With numerous examples to supplement her rich theoretical discussion, Nel Noddings builds a compelling philosophical argument for an ethics based on natural caring, as in the care of a mother for her child. In _Caring_—now updated with a new preface and afterword reflecting on the ongoing relevance of the subject matter—the author provides a wide-ranging consideration of whether organizations, which operate at a remove from the caring relationship, can truly be called ethical. She discusses the extent to which (...)
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  31. Peta Bowden (2008). Caring: Gender-Sensitive Ethics. Routledge.
    In _Caring_, Peta Bowden extends and challenges recent debates on feminist ethics. She takes issue with accounts of the ethics of care that focus on alleged principles of caring rather than analysing caring in practice. Caring, Bowden argues, must be understood by 'working through examples'. Following this approach, Bowden explores four main caring practices: mothering, friendship, nursing and citizenship. Her analysis of the differences and similarities in these practices - their varying degrees of intimacy and reciprocity, (...)
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  32.  64
    Margaret Olivia Little (1995). Seeing and Caring: The Role of Affect in Feminist Moral Epistemology. Hypatia 10 (3):117 - 137.
    I develop two different epistemic roles for emotion and desire. Caring for moral ends and people plays a pivotal though contingent role in ensuring reliable awareness of morally salient details; possession of various emotions and motives is a necessary condition for autonomous understanding of moral concepts themselves. Those who believe such connections compromise the "objective" status of morality tend to assume rather than argue for the bifurcated conception of reason and affect this essay challenges.
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  33.  97
    Daniel Engster (2005). Rethinking Care Theory: The Practice of Caring and the Obligation to Care. Hypatia 20 (3):50-74.
    : Care theorists have made significant gains over the past twenty-five years in establishing caring as a viable moral and political concept. Nonetheless, the concept of caring remains underdeveloped as a basis for a moral and political philosophy, and there is no fully developed account of our moral obligation to care. This article advances thinking about caring by developing a definition of caring and a theory of obligation to care sufficient to ground a general moral and (...)
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  34. Shirong Luo (2007). Relation, Virtue, and Relational Virtue: Three Concepts of Caring. Hypatia 22 (3):92-110.
    : This essay breaks new ground in defending the view that contemporary care-based ethics and early Confucian ethics share some important common ground. Luo also introduces the notion of relational virtue in an attempt to bridge a conceptual gap between relational caring ethics and agent-based virtue ethics, and to make the connections between the ethics of care and Confucian ethics philosophically clearer and more defensible.
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  35.  95
    Jeffrey Seidman (2010). Caring and Incapacity. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):301 - 322.
    This essay seeks to explain a morally important class of psychological incapacity—the class of what Bernard Williams has called “incapacities of character.” I argue for two main claims: (1) Caring is the underlying psychological disposition that gives rise to incapacities of character. (2) In competent, rational adults, caring is, in part, a cognitive and deliberative disposition. Caring is a mental state which disposes an agent to believe certain considerations to be good reasons for deliberation and action. And (...)
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  36.  4
    E. Chwang, D. C. Landy & R. R. Sharp (2007). Views Regarding the Training of Ethics Consultants: A Survey of Physicians Caring for Patients in ICU. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (6):320-324.
    Background: Despite the expansion of ethics consultation services, questions remain about the aims of clinical ethics consultation, its methods and the expertise of those who provide such services.Objective: To describe physicians’ expectations regarding the training and skills necessary for ethics consultants to contribute effectively to the care of patients in intensive care unit .Design: Mailed survey.Participants: Physicians responsible for the care of at least 10 patients in ICU over a 6-month period at a 921-bed private teaching hospital with an established (...)
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  37.  3
    Philip Thomas & Eleanor Longden (2013). Madness, Childhood Adversity and Narrative Psychiatry: Caring and the Moral Imagination. Medical Humanities 39 (2):119-125.
    The dominance of technological paradigms within psychiatry creates moral and ethical tensions over how to engage with the interpersonal narratives of those experiencing mental distress. This paper argues that such paradigms are poorly suited for fostering principled responses to human suffering, and proposes an alternative approach that considers a view of relationships based in feminist theories about the nature of caring. Four primary characteristics are presented which distinguish caring from technological paradigms: a concern with the particular nature of (...)
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  38. Rosie Cox (2010). Some Problems and Possibilities of Caring. Ethics, Policy and Environment 13 (2):113-130.
    . Some problems and possibilities of caring. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 13, The Ethics of Care, pp. 113-130. doi: 10.1080/13668791003778800.
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  39.  17
    Bert H. Hodges (2015). Language as a Values‐Realizing Activity: Caring, Acting, and Perceiving. Zygon 50 (3):711-735.
    A problem for natural scientific accounts, psychology in particular, is the existence of value. An ecological account of values is reviewed and illustrated in three domains of research: carrying differing loads; negotiating social dilemmas involving agreement and disagreement; and timing the exposure of various visual presentations. Then it is applied in greater depth to the nature of language. As described and illustrated, values are ontological relationships that are neither subjective nor objective, but which constrain and obligate all significant animate activity (...)
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  40.  2
    Bert Hodges (2009). Ecological Pragmatics: Values, Dialogical Arrays, Complexity, and Caring. Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (3):628-652.
    This paper explores the hypothesis that first-order linguistic activities are better understood in terms of ecological, values-realizing dynamics rather than in terms of rule-governed processes. Conversing, like other perception-action skills is constrained by multiple values, heterarchically organized. This hypothesis is explored in terms of three broad approaches that contrast with models of language which view it as a cognitive system: conversing as a perceptual system for exploring dialogical arrays ; conversing as an action system for integrating diverse space-time scales ; (...)
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  41. Sin Yee Chan (2000). Can Shu Be the One Word That Serves as the Guiding Principle of Caring Actions? Philosophy East and West 50 (4):507-524.
    It is argued that shu involves one's identification with another person while one criticizes the latter's perspective based on one's own. A mechanism is proposed for developing this sort of critique, based on some significant Confucian values. Finally, shu is applied to the context of caring actions, and it is shown how it can help to solve some of the problems arising in caring for others.
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  42.  7
    Lynda Birke, Joanna Hockenhull & Emma Creighton (2010). The Horse’s Tale: Narratives of Caring for/About Horses. Society and Animals 18 (4):331-347.
    In this paper, we report on a study of people who keep horses for leisure riding; the study was based on a qualitative analysis of written comments made by people keeping horses, focusing on how they care for them and how they describe horse behavior. These commentaries followed participation in an online survey investigating management practices. The responses clustered around two significant themes: the first centered around people’s methods of caring for their animal and the dependence of such care (...)
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  43.  14
    Stan van Hooft (2011). Caring, Objectivity and Justice: An Integrative View. Nursing Ethics 18 (2):149-160.
    The argument of this article is framed by a debate between the principle of humanity and the principle of justice. Whereas the principle of humanity requires us to care about others and to want to help them meet their vital needs, and so to be partial towards those others, the principle of justice requires us to consider their needs without the intrusion of our subjective interests or emotions so that we can act with impartiality. I argue that a deep form (...)
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  44.  36
    Sara T. Fry (1989). The Role of Caring in a Theory of Nursing Ethics. Hypatia 4 (2):88 - 103.
    The development of nursing ethics as a field of inquiry has largely relied on theories of medical ethics that use autonomy, beneficence, and/or justice as foundational ethical principles. Such theories espouse a masculine approach to moral decision-making and ethical analysis. This paper challenges the presumption of medical ethics and its associated system of moral justification as an appropriate model for nursing ethics. It argues that the value foundations of nursing ethics are located within the existential phenomenon of human caring (...)
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  45.  25
    Anita Silvers (1995). Reconciling Equality to Difference: Caring (F)or Justice for People with Disabilities. Hypatia 10 (1):30 - 55.
    A feminist ethics that bases morality on dependence or vulnerability challenges the moral priority of uniform over disparate treatment. Persons with disabilities resist equality's homogenization of moral personhood. But displacing equality in favor of caring or trust reprises the repression of those already marginalized. The ethics of difference proves an ineffective remedy for the negative consequences attendant on how historically marginalized groups are different. An historicized conception of equality resolves the dilemma.
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  46. Dimitria Electra Gatzia (2011). Towards a Caring Economy. In Maurice Hamington & Maureen Sander-Staudt (eds.), Applying Care Ethics to Business. Springer
    The aim of this paper is to show that a business ethic based on the ethics of care is superior to traditional business ethics. It shall be argued that neo-liberalism is inconsistent with the ethics of care since it either excludes caring institutions or treats them as preferences to be satisfied as the ‘free’ market sees fit. Unlike traditional business ethics, a business ethic based on the ethics of care can play an important role in challenging the neo-liberal paradigm. (...)
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  47.  3
    S. Patricia D. Enes & Kay de Vries (2004). A Survey of Ethical Issues Experienced by Nurses Caring for Terminally Ill Elderly People. Nursing Ethics 11 (2):150-164.
    This study examined the ethical issues experienced by nurses working in a small group of elderly persons’ care settings in the UK, using a survey questionnaire previously used in other countries for examining the cultural aspects of ethical issues. However ‘culture’ relates not only to ethnicity but also the organizational culture in which care is delivered. Nurses working in elderly persons’ care settings described a range of issues faced when caring for elderly terminally ill people, which illustrated the different (...)
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  48.  5
    Dowin H. Boatright & Jean Abbott (2013). Not Your Typical Frequent Flyer: Overcoming Mythology in Caring for Sickle Cell Disease Patients. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):18 - 20.
    (2013). Not Your Typical Frequent Flyer: Overcoming Mythology in Caring for Sickle Cell Disease Patients. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 18-20. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.767963.
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  49.  9
    William J. Morgan (2007). Caring, Final Ends and Sports. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):7 – 21.
    In this essay I argue that sports at their best qualify as final ends, that is, as ends whose value is such that they ground not only the practices whose ends they are, but everything else we do as human agents. The argument I provide to support my thesis is derived from Harry Frankfurt's provocative work on the importance of the things we care about, more specifically, on his claim that it is by virtue of caring about things and (...)
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  50.  43
    John Silk (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)Partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Introduction. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):303 – 309.
    (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Introduction. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 303-309. doi: 10.1080/713665900.
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