Search results for 'Caring' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peta Bowden (1997). Caring: Gender-Sensitive Ethics. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Caring extends and challenges recent debates over feminist ethics by taking issue with accounts of the ethics of care which try to pin down the "principles" of caring, rather than understanding the practice of caring. It explores four main caring practices: mothering, friendship, nursing and citizenship. Bowden's consideration of the differences and similarities in these working practices reveals the complexity of the ethics of caring.
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  2. Jeffrey Seidman (2009). Valuing and Caring. Theoria 75 (4):272-303.score: 18.0
    What is it to "value" something, in the semi-technical sense of the term that Gary Watson establishes? I argue that valuing something consists in caring about it. Caring involves not only emotional dispositions of the sort that Agnieszka Jaworska has elaborated, but also a distinctive cognitive disposition – namely, a (defeasible) disposition to believe the object cared about to be a source of agent-relative reasons for action and for emotion. Understood in this way, an agent's carings have a (...)
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  3. Jane Sumner (2010). Reflection and Moral Maturity in a Nurse's Caring Practice: A Critical Perspective. Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):159-169.score: 18.0
    The likelihood of nurse reflection is examined from the theoretical perspectives of Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Action and Sumner's Moral Construct of Caring in Nursing as Communicative Action, through a critical social theory lens. The argument is made that until the nurse reaches the developmental level of post-conventional moral maturity and/or Benner's Stage 5: expert, he or she is not capable of being inwardly directed reflective on self. The three developmental levels of moral maturity and Benner's (...)
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  4. Nel Noddings (2002). Caring, Social Policy, and Homelessness. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):441-454.score: 18.0
    Care theory offers a way to overcome a weaknessof liberalism – its reluctance to intervene inthe private lives of adults. In caring for thehomeless, we must sometimes use a limited formof coercion, but our intervention is alwaysinteractive, and the process of finding asolution is one of negotiation between theneeds expressed by the homeless and the needswe infer for them.
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  5. Anita Lundqvist & Tore Nilstun (2009). Noddings's Caring Ethics Theory Applied in a Paediatric Setting. Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):113-123.score: 18.0
    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. (...)
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  6. John H. Kultgen (1995). Autonomy and Intervention: Parentalism in the Caring Life. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The basic relationship between people should be care, and the caring life is the highest which humans can live. Unfortunately, care that is not thoughtful slides into illegitimate intrusion on autonomy. Autonomy is a basic good, and we should not abridge it without good reason. On the other hand, it is not the only good. We must sometimes intervene in the lives of others to protect them from grave harms or provide them with important benefits. The reflective person, therefore, (...)
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  7. Riane Eisler & Daniel S. Levine (2002). Nurture, Nature, and Caring: We Are Not Prisoners of Our Genes. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (1):9-52.score: 18.0
    This article develops a theory for how caringbehavior fits into the makeup of humans andother mammals. Biochemical evidence for threemajor patterns of response to stressful orotherwise complex situations is reviewed. There is the classic fight-or-flight response;the dissociative response, involving emotionalwithdrawal and disengagement; and the bondingresponse, a variant of which Taylor et al. (2000) called tend-and-befriend. All three ofthese responses can be explained as adaptationsthat have been selected for in evolution andare shared between humans and other mammals. Yet each of us (...)
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  8. Weihui Fu & Satish P. Deshpande (2013). The Impact of Caring Climate, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment on Job Performance of Employees in a China's Insurance Company. Journal of Business Ethics:1-11.score: 18.0
    This research uses structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the direct and indirect relationships among caring climate, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job performance of 476 employees working in a Chinese insurance company. The SEM result showed that caring climate had a significant direct impact on job satisfaction, organizational command, and job performance. Caring climate also had a significant indirect impact on organizational commitment through the mediating role of job satisfaction, and on job performance through the mediating (...)
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  9. Louise Anne Mccuaig (2011). Dangerous Carers: Pastoral Power and the Caring Teacher of Contemporary Australian Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):862-877.score: 18.0
    Whilst care imperatives have arisen across the breadth of Western societies, within the education sector they appear both prolific and urgent. This paper explores the deployment of care discourses within education generally and draws upon the case of Australian Health and Physical Education (HPE) more specifically, to undertake a Foucauldian interrogation of care. In so doing I demonstrate the usefulness of Foucault's pastoral power lens and its capacity to provide insight into the moral and ethical work conducted by caring (...)
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  10. Adrienne S. Chambon & Allan Irving (2003). “They Give Reason a Responsibility Which It Simply Can't Bear”: Ethics, Care of the Self, and Caring Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (3-4):265-278.score: 18.0
    We explore briefly Foucault's ideas about the care of the self, creating ourselves and what he meant by ethics. We then examine the work of five artists–Mark Rothko, Cindy Sherman, Helena Hietanen, Samuel Beckett, and Betty Goodwin–to help us begin to think very differently about illness and human suffering. Taking our lead from Beckett, we regard reason as being given too much responsibility for the work of a caring knowledge, and that it is through the arts that new ideas (...)
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  11. Jo Bridgeman (2007). 'Exceptional' Women, Healthcare Consumers and the Inevitability of Caring. Feminist Legal Studies 15 (2):235-245.score: 18.0
    In Rogers, the Court of Appeal held that the decision of Swindon N.H.S. Primary Care Trust to refuse to fund Herceptin for the treatment of Ann Rogers against breast cancer was irrational. The P.C.T. maintained that their decision was not resource driven but based on the fact that Herceptin was, at that time, not licensed by the European Medicines Agency (E.M.E.A.) for use in early stage breast cancer. Yet it was prepared to fund its use in ‹exceptional circumstances’ which could (...)
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  12. Tamara Kohn & Rosemary McKechnie (eds.) (1999). Extending the Boundaries of Care: Medical Ethics and Caring Practices. Berg.score: 18.0
    How is the concept of patient care adapting in response to rapid changes in healthcare delivery and advances in medical technology? How are questions of ethical responsibility and social diversity shaping the definitions of healthcare? In this topical study, scholars in anthropology, nursing theory, law and ethics explore questions involving the changing relationship between patient care and medical ethics. Contributors address issues that challenge the boundaries of patient care, such as: · HIV-related care and research · the impact of new (...)
     
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  13. Betty L. Wells & Shelly Gradwell (2001). Gender and Resource Management: Community Supported Agriculture as Caring-Practice. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):107-119.score: 18.0
    Interviews with Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) growers in Iowa, a majority of whom are women, shed light on the relationship between gender and CSA as a system of resource management. Growers, male and female alike, are differentiated by care and caring-practices. Care-practices, historically associated with women, place priority on local context and relationships. The concern of these growers for community, nature, land, water, soil, and other resources is manifest in care-motives and care-practices. Their specific mix of motives differs: providing (...)
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  14. Susan S. Phillips & Patricia E. Benner (eds.) (1994). The Crisis of Care: Affirming and Restoring Caring Practices in the Helping Professions. Georgetown University Press.score: 15.0
    Selected as Outstanding Academic Book by Choice magazine.
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  15. Helga Kuhse (1997). Caring: Nurses, Women, and Ethics. Blackwell Publishers.score: 15.0
  16. Berit Lindahl (2011). Experiences of Exclusion When Living on a Ventilator: Reflections Based on the Application of Julia Kristeva's Philosophy to Caring Science. Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):12-21.score: 15.0
  17. Gunilla Carlsson, Nancy Drew, Karin Dahlberg & Kim Lützen (2002). Uncovering Tacit Caring Knowledge. Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):144-151.score: 15.0
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  18. Hanan Alexander (2013). Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):488-493.score: 15.0
  19. Evridiki Papastavrou, Chrysoula Karlou, Haritini Tsangari, Georgios Efstathiou, Valmi D. Sousa, Anastasios Merkouris & Elisabeth Patiraki (2011). Cross‐Cultural Validation and Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Caring Behaviors Inventory: A Methodological Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):435-443.score: 15.0
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  20. Marilyn J. Mason (1997). Seven Mountains: The Inner Climb to Commitment and Caring. Dutton.score: 15.0
     
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  21. Arthur Olsen (ed.) (1999). The Call to Care: Dimensions, Dilemmas, and Directions of Caring. Ex Machina Publishing.score: 15.0
     
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  22. Stephen Gill & Isabella Bakker (2006). New Constitutionalism and the Social Reproduction of Caring Institutions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):35-57.score: 14.0
    This essay analyzes neo-liberal economic agreements and legal and political frameworks or what has been called the “new constitutionalism,” a governance framework that empowers market forces to reshape economic and social development worldwide. The article highlights some consequences of new constitutionalism for caring institutions specifically, and for what feminists call social reproduction more generally: the biological reproduction of the species; the reproduction of labor power; and the reproduction of social institutions and processes associated with the creation and maintenance of (...)
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  23. Aaron Smuts, Five Theses About Caring.score: 14.0
    I defend five theses about caring: Thesis 1: Animals can care. Thesis 2: Care is not an emotion. Thesis 3: To care is to value. Thesis 4: Caring cannot be reduced to belief. Thesis 5: Caring cannot be reduced to desire. These five theses do not amount to a full fledge theory of care, but they get us much closer to a workable analysis. They help sketch some of the contours of the concept and close off a (...)
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  24. Elin Palm (2013). Who Cares? Moral Obligations in Formal and Informal Care Provision in the Light of ICT-Based Home Care. Health Care Analysis 21 (2):171-188.score: 13.0
    An aging population is often taken to require a profound reorganization of the prevailing health care system. In particular, a more cost-effective care system is warranted and ICT-based home care is often considered a promising alternative. Modern health care devices admit a transfer of patients with rather complex care needs from institutions to the home care setting. With care recipients set up with health monitoring technologies at home, spouses and children are likely to become involved in the caring process (...)
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  25. Jan Reed (1994). Two Paradoxes of Caring: A Response to Gorovitz. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 2 (3):217-220.score: 13.0
    The notion of caring is extremely problematic in the way that it is defined, practised and promoted. In response to Gorovitz I have attempted to go beyond the discussion of how health care workers can promote care at an organisational level, and look at some of the paradoxical elements of caring as it is currently being described. These paradoxes arise, in part, from the current emphasis on individualism in Western society which has made the notion of ‘mass care’ (...)
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  26. Yvonne Denier, Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé, Nele De Bal & Chris Gastmans (2010). “It's Intense, You Know.” Nurses' Experiences in Caring for Patients Requesting Euthanasia. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):41-48.score: 13.0
    The Belgian Act on Euthanasia came into force on 23 September 2002, making Belgium the second country—after the Netherlands—to decriminalize euthanasia under certain due-care conditions. Since then, Belgian nurses have been increasingly involved in euthanasia care. In this paper, we report a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with 18 nurses from Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) who have had experience in caring for patients requesting euthanasia since May 2002 (the approval of the Act). We found that the (...)
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  27. Jens Erik Paulsen (2011). A Narrative Ethics of Care. Health Care Analysis 19 (1):28-40.score: 13.0
    If ethics of care deals with the nature of relationships, attentiveness, and understanding particular others, narrativity ought to play a central part. Sometimes, caring simply amounts to working with narratives. In the article I claim that narrativity can even be said to be native to an ethics of care. Through an example, I demonstrate how a narrative ethics of care can discern and grasp some moral problems better than the standard theoretical outlooks.
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  28. Samuel Gorovitz (1994). Is Caring a Viable Component of Health Care? Health Care Analysis 2 (2):129-133.score: 13.0
    The attitudes and behaviours that constitute caring affect both the quality of the patient's experience and the outcomes of medical care. They can be identified and can be nurtured or discouraged by the structures of organisation and financing within which health care is provided. They have costs, so their viability is threatened as pressures increase to make health care more economically efficient. Yet the value of caring behaviour may justify what is necessary to sustain it. This issue deserves (...)
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  29. Virginia Held (2006). The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Virginia Held assesses the ethics of care as a promising alternative to the familiar moral theories that serve so inadequately to guide our lives. The ethics of care is only a few decades old, yet it is by now a distinct moral theory or normative approach to the problems we face. It is relevant to global and political matters as well as to the personal relations that can most clearly exemplify care. This book clarifies just what the ethics of care (...)
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  30. Michael A. Slote (2007). The Ethics of Care and Empathy. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Caring based in empathy -- Our obligations to help others -- Deontology -- Autonomy and empathy -- Care ethics vs. liberalism -- Social justice -- Caring and rationality.
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  31. Jeffrey Seidman (2010). Caring and Incapacity. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):301 - 322.score: 12.0
    This essay seeks to explain a morally important class of psychological incapacity—the class of what Bernard Williams has called “incapacities of character.” I argue for two main claims: (1) Caring is the underlying psychological disposition that gives rise to incapacities of character. (2) In competent, rational adults, caring is, in part, a cognitive and deliberative disposition. Caring is a mental state which disposes an agent to believe certain considerations to be good reasons for deliberation and action. And (...)
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  32. Daniel Engster (2005). Rethinking Care Theory: The Practice of Caring and the Obligation to Care. Hypatia 20 (3):50-74.score: 12.0
    : Care theorists have made significant gains over the past twenty-five years in establishing caring as a viable moral and political concept. Nonetheless, the concept of caring remains underdeveloped as a basis for a moral and political philosophy, and there is no fully developed account of our moral obligation to care. This article advances thinking about caring by developing a definition of caring and a theory of obligation to care sufficient to ground a general moral and (...)
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  33. Agnieszka Jaworska (2007). Caring and Internality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (3):529-568.score: 12.0
    In his work on internality, identification, and caring, Harry Frankfurt attempts to delineate the organization of agency peculiar to human beings, while avoiding the traditional overintellectualized emphasis on the human capacity to reason about action. The focal point of Frankfurt’s alternative picture is our capacity to make our own motivation the object of reflection. Building upon the observation that marginal agents (such as young children and Alzheimer’s patients) are capable of caring, I show that neither caring nor (...)
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  34. John Cottingham (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)Partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Partiality, Distance and Moral Obligation. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):309 – 313.score: 12.0
    (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Partiality, Distance and Moral Obligation. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 309-313. doi: 10.1080/713665894.
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  35. Shirong Luo (2007). Relation, Virtue, and Relational Virtue: Three Concepts of Caring. Hypatia 22 (3):92-110.score: 12.0
    : This essay breaks new ground in defending the view that contemporary care-based ethics and early Confucian ethics share some important common ground. Luo also introduces the notion of relational virtue in an attempt to bridge a conceptual gap between relational caring ethics and agent-based virtue ethics, and to make the connections between the ethics of care and Confucian ethics philosophically clearer and more defensible.
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  36. John Silk (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)Partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Introduction. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):303 – 309.score: 12.0
    (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Introduction. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 303-309. doi: 10.1080/713665900.
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  37. John Silk (1998). Caring at a Distance. Philosophy and Geography 1 (2):165 – 182.score: 12.0
    The paper draws upon new conceptions of place, space, interaction and community in Geography and Media Studies to explore the possibilities of extending existing conceptions of care and caring from the context with which they are traditionally associated—face-to-face encounters within a shared physical locale. It proposes three structures of 'caring at a distance', all of which have a core element of mediated or distanciated interaction, and concludes that mass media and electronic networks play a significant role in extending (...)
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  38. Patrick Gilkes (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)Partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Manipulation and Exploitation? Western Media and the Third World. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):317 – 319.score: 12.0
    (2000). Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Manipulation and Exploitation? Western Media and the Third World. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 317-319. doi: 10.1080/713665895.
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  39. Ross Buck (2002). “Choice” and “Emotion” in Altruism: Reflections on the Morality of Justice Versus the Morality of Caring. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):254-255.score: 12.0
    Rachlin uses the word “choice” 80 times, whereas “emotion” does not appear. In contrast, “Empathy: Its ultimate and proximate bases” by Preston and de Waal, uses the word “emotion” 139 times and “choice” once. This commentary compares these ways of approaching empathy and altruism, relating Rachlin's approach to Gilligan's Morality of Justice and Preston and de Waal's to the Morality of Caring.
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  40. Monique Lanoix (2009). Shades of Gray: From Caring to Uncaring Labor. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2):31-50.score: 12.0
    A notable feature of post-Fordist economies is the increase in service jobs, which includes care occupations such as child care and elder care (Folbre 2001, 182). The commodification of caring activities raises issues surrounding the reception and dispensation of these services, and this is particularly salient to the focus of this paper, elder care. Because the demand for this type of care has greatly increased in recent decades (Glendinning, Schunk, and McLaughlin 1997; Kaye et al. 2006) and also in (...)
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  41. Warren French & Alexander Weis (2000). An Ethics of Care or an Ethics of Justice. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):125 - 136.score: 12.0
    A conflict within the community of those investigating business ethics is whether decision makers are motivated by an ethics of justice or an ethics of caring. The proposition put forward in this paper is that ethical orientations are strongly related to cultural backgrounds. Specifically, Hofstede's cultural stereotyping using his masculine-feminine dimension may well match a culture's reliance on justice or caring when decisions are made. A study of college graduates from six countries showed that Hofstede's dimension was remarkably (...)
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  42. Sin Yee Chan (2000). Can Shu Be the One Word That Serves as the Guiding Principle of Caring Actions? Philosophy East and West 50 (4):507-524.score: 12.0
    It is argued that shu involves one's identification with another person while one criticizes the latter's perspective based on one's own. A mechanism is proposed for developing this sort of critique, based on some significant Confucian values. Finally, shu is applied to the context of caring actions, and it is shown how it can help to solve some of the problems arising in caring for others.
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  43. Nancy S. Jecker (2002). Taking Care of One's Own: Justice and Family Caregiving. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2):117-133.score: 12.0
    This paper asks whether adult children have aduty of justice to act as caregivers for theirfrail, elderly parents. I begin (Sections I.and II.) by locating the historical reasons whyrelationships within families were not thoughtto raise issues of justice. I argue that thesereasons are misguided. The paper next presentsspecific examples showing the relevance ofjustice to family relationships. I point outthat in the United States today, the burden ofcaregiving for dependent parents fallsdisproportionately on women (Sections III. andIV.). The paper goes on to (...)
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  44. Joan F. Goodman (2008). Responding to Children's Needs: Amplifying the Caring Ethic. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):233-248.score: 12.0
    According to care theory the good parent confronting a helpless child has an unmediated impulse to relieve his distress; that impulse grows into a prescriptive ethic of relatedness, often contrasted to the more individualistic ethic of justice. If, however, a child's nature is understood as assertive and competent as well as fragile and dependent; if, in addition, he acquires needs through socialisation and is the beneficiary of inferred needs determined by others, then an ethic of need-gratification is insufficient. Caring (...)
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  45. William J. Morgan (2007). Caring, Final Ends and Sports. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):7 – 21.score: 12.0
    In this essay I argue that sports at their best qualify as final ends, that is, as ends whose value is such that they ground not only the practices whose ends they are, but everything else we do as human agents. The argument I provide to support my thesis is derived from Harry Frankfurt's provocative work on the importance of the things we care about, more specifically, on his claim that it is by virtue of caring about things and (...)
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  46. Amber N. Bloomfield, Josh A. Sager, Daniel M. Bartels & Douglas L. Medin (2006). Caring About Framing Effects. Mind and Society 5 (2):123-138.score: 12.0
    We explored the relationship between qualities of victims in hypothetical scenarios and the appearance of framing effects. In past studies, participants’ feelings about the victims have been demonstrated to affect whether framing effects appear, but this relationship has not been directly examined. In the present study, we examined the relationship between caring about the people at risk, the perceived interdependence of the people at risk, and frame. Scenarios were presented that differed in the degree to which participants could be (...)
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  47. Sandrine Berges (forthcoming). Is Motherhood Compatible with Political Participation? Sophie de Grouchy's Care-Based Republicanism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.score: 12.0
    Motherhood, as it is practiced, constitutes an obstacle to gender equality in political participation. Several options are available as a potential solution to this problem. One is to advice women not to become mothers, or if they do, to devote less time and energy to caring for their children. However this will have negative repercussions for those who need to be cared for, whether children, sick people or the elderly. A second solution is to reject the view that political (...)
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  48. Michael Bamberg & Nancy Budwig (1992). Therapeutic Misconceptions: When the Voices of Caring and Research Are Misconstrued as the Voice of Curing. Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):165 – 184.score: 12.0
    Research on doctor-patient communication has characterized such interactions as being asymmetrical. The present article tries to shift emphasis away from the different orientations individuals bring to the communicative setting and attempts to highlight the different orientations ("voices") within a given individual. We draw on an in-depth analysis of discourse between a 2 l-year-old man who can be ascribed the roles of both patient and potential research subject and an interviewer who acts in both the role of medical staff and researcher. (...)
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  49. Janel M. Curry (2002). Care Theory and ``Caring'' Systems of Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 19 (2):119-131.score: 12.0
    Care Theory is a growing schoolof ethics that starts with the assumption ofthe relational nature of human beings. Incontrast, the dominant assumption of theautonomous view of human nature has made itdifficult to integrate ``relational'' aspects ofreality into the realm of political actionrelated to agriculture. Variables such ascommunity attachment, community vitality andrichness, and environmental ``fit'' cannot beincorporated into policy because such variablesare perceived to be tainted by ``attachment,''and compromise rational judgement. Feministagricultural theorists parallel Care Theory andhave the potential of extending Care (...)
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  50. Garrett K. Chan (2005). Understanding End‐of‐Life Caring Practices in the Emergency Department: Developing Merleau‐Ponty's Notions of Intentional Arc and Maximum Grip Through Praxis and Phronesis. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):19-32.score: 11.0
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