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  1. Carl N. Still (2011). Marilyn McCord Adams , Some Later Medieval Theories of the Eucharist: Thomas Aquinas, Giles of Rome, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (6):391-393.
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  2. Carl N. Still (2009). The Divine Sense: The Intellect in Patristic Theology (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 135-136.
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  3. Carl N. Still (2008). Pico's Quest for All Knowledge. In M. V. Dougherty (ed.), Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
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  4. Kevin Corrigan & Carl N. Still (2004). The Problem of Aquinas's Notion of Reditio Completa in Relation to its Neoplatonic Sources. In Jeremiah Hackett, William E. Murnion & Carl N. Still (eds.), Being and Thought in Aquinas. Global Academic Pub..
     
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  5. Jeremiah Hackett, William E. Murnion & Carl N. Still (eds.) (2004). Being and Thought in Aquinas. Global Academic Pub..
  6. Carl N. Still (2003). John Buridan: Portrait of a Fourteenth-Century Arts Master by Jack Zupko. [REVIEW] Dialogue 42 (04):832-834.
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  7. Carl N. Still (2003). Leslie, John. Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology. Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):154-155.
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  8. Carl N. Still (2001). Do We Know All After Death? Thomas Aquinas on the Disembodied Soul's Knowledge. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:107-119.
    This paper examines Aquinas’s epistemological treatment of the disembodied soul in order to reveal (1) its relationship to the person it once was, and (2) the nature and extent of its self-knowledge. I argue first that disembodiment entails not only loss of personhood, but severe restriction of one’s concept of self. Consequently, individual self-consciousness is minimized. By contrast, I argue that the soul’s knowledge of its nature is likely to be realized more perfectly in the separated state, not so much (...)
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  9. Carl N. Still (1999). Gifted Knowledge: An Exception to Thomistic Epistemology? The Thomist 63 (2):173-190.
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