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Profile: Carlo Filice
  1. Carlo Filice (2011). The Purpose of Life: An Eastern Philosophical Vision. Upa.
    Suppose that this world is not an accident, but an expression of a divine super-mind. This book boldly contends that divine motives are guided by values that exist objectively, defending a cosmic vision that has been prominent in the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years.
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  2. Carlo Filice (2010). Libertarian Autonomy and Intrinsic Motives. Social Theory and Practice 36 (4):565-592.
    The causa sui is the best self-contradiction that has yet been conceived, it is a sort of logical violation and unnaturalness; but the extravagant pride of man has managed to entangle itself profoundly and frightfully with this very folly. The desire for “freedom of will” in the superlative, metaphysical sense, such as still holds sway, unfortunately, in the minds of the half-educated, the desire to bear the entire and ultimate responsibility for one’s actions oneself, and to absolve God, the world, (...)
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  3. Carlo Filice (2006). Rawls and Non-Rational Beneficiaries. Between the Species 13 (6):3.
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  4. Carlo Filice (2006). The Moral Case for Reincarnation. Religious Studies 42 (1):45-61.
    I attempt to show that a cosmic theistic scheme that includes multiple lives as part of a benign plan for the world is likely to be the most moral scheme. It has the best chance of dealing with key aspects of the problem of evil, or of apparent cosmic injustice – particularly when compared to a single-life scheme. Its advantages have to do with the initial disparate condition of children, and with the massive nature of undeserved harm. A multiple-lives scheme (...)
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  5. Carlo Filice (2004). On the Autonomy of the Divine. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 55 (2):83-108.
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  6. Carlo Filice (1992). Pacifism. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:119-153.
    I argue in this paper that pacifism is a live moral option. I do this in four steps. First, I try to make the case that the backing of thinkers and prophets of the stature of Gandhi and Jesus lends pacifism some prima-facie moral legitimacy. Second, I try to determine what the ethical-metaphysical preconditions that would justify pacifism would have to be---and I conclude that some consequentialist soul-exposing scheme would be required. Third, I argue that such a scheme would be (...)
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  7. Carlo Filice (1990). Moral Theories, Impartiality, and the Status of Non-Rational, Sentient Beings. Between the Species 6 (2):3.
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  8. Carlo Filice (1988). Non-Substantial Streams of Consciousness and Free Action. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):1-11.
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  9. Carlo Filice (1987). Causation and the Self. International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (3):329-334.
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  10. Carlo Filice (1986). Sustained Causation and the Substantial Theory of the Self. International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (2):137-145.
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  11. Carlo Filice (1985). Persons, Motivation, and Acts. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):201-215.
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  12. Carlo Filice (1983). Agency and the Self. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    This thesis attempts to show that an adequate account of human agency requires postulation of a substantial self that is intrinsically active. It proposes and defends a coherent picture of this self's relation to its states, notably, to its motives; and it tries to establish the conditions for freedom-qua-autonomy. ;It is first shown that the "action-event" distinction is real and ontologically significant. Explanations of this distinction are found to come in two types: event-causal and agent-causal. Each, in turn, is examined. (...)
     
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