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  1. Carlo Rovelli (2014). Why Gauge? Foundations of Physics 44 (1):91-104.
    The world appears to be well described by gauge theories; why? I suggest that gauge is more than mathematical redundancy. Gauge-dependent quantities can not be predicted, but there is a sense in which they can be measured. They describe “handles” though which systems couple: they represent real relational structures to which the experimentalist has access in measurement by supplying one of the relata in the measurement procedure itself. This observation leads to a physical interpretation for the ubiquity of gauge: it (...)
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  2. Carlo Rovelli (2013). A Critical Look at Strings. Foundations of Physics 43 (1):8-20.
    Following the invitation of the editors of Foundations of Physics, I give here a personal assessment of string theory, from the point of view of an outsider, and I compare it with the theory, methods, and expectations of my own field.
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  3. Carlo Rovelli (2011). Che Cos'è la Scienza: La Rivoluzione di Anassimandro. Mondadori Università.
    All human civilizations have thought that the world was made of sky above and the Earth below. All except one. For the Greeks, the Earth was a rock floating in space, and under the earth there was no ground, no turtles, nor the gigantic columns of which the Bible speaks. How did the Greeks understand that the Earth is suspended in nothingness? Who understood this and how? It is this unique "scientific revolution" of Anaximander of which the author speaks, which (...)
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  4. Carlo Rovelli (2011). “Forget Time”. Foundations of Physics 41 (9):1475-1490.
    Following a line of research that I have developed for several years, I argue that the best strategy for understanding quantum gravity is to build a picture of the physical world where the notion of time plays no role at all. I summarize here this point of view, explaining why I think that in a fundamental description of nature we must “forget time”, and how this can be done in the classical and in the quantum theory. The idea is to (...)
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  5. Carlo Rovelli (2011). Some Considerations on Infinity in Physics. In Michał Heller & W. H. Woodin (eds.), Infinity: New Research Frontiers. Cambridge University Press. 167.
    I am a theoretical physicist, and, following Aristotles' injunction (Aristotle, Physics III, 202b 34), I do consider it my responsibility to discuss the problem of the notion of infinity in the world--in particular, to "inquire whether there is such a thing or not." I will do so here by illustrating some aspects of the notion of infinity in the natural sciences.
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  6. Carlo Rovelli (2011). The First Scientist: Anaximander and His Legacy. Westholme.
    The sixth century -- Anaximander's contributions -- Atmospheric phenomena -- Earth floats in space, suspended in the void -- Invisible entities and natural laws -- Rebellion becomes virtue -- Writing, democracy, and cultural crossbreeding -- What is science? -- Between cultural relativism and absolute thought -- Can we understand the world without Gods? -- Prescientific thought.
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  7. Carlo Rovelli (2009). Anaximander's Legacy. Collapse. Philosophical Research and Development 5:50-71.
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  8. Matteo Smerlak & Carlo Rovelli (2007). Relational EPR. Foundations of Physics 37 (3):427-445.
    We study the EPR-type correlations from the perspective of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics. We argue that these correlations do not entail any form of “non-locality”, when viewed in the context of this interpretation. The abandonment of strict Einstein realism implied by the relational stance permits to reconcile quantum mechanics, completeness, (operationally defined) separability, and locality.
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  9. Carlo Rovelli (2004). Comment On: “Causality and the Arrow of Classical Time”, by Fritz Rohrlich. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (3):397-405.
    Rohrlich claims that “the problem of the arrow of time in classical dynamics has been solved”. The solution he proposes is based on the equations governing the motion of extended particles. Rohrlich claims that these equations, which must take self-interaction into account, are not invariant under time reversal. I dispute this claim, on several grounds.
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  10. Carlo Rovelli (1998). “Incerto Tempore, Incertisque Loci”: Can We Compute the Exact Time at Which a Quantum Measurement Happens? [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 28 (7):1031-1043.
    Without addressing the measurement problem (i. e., what causes the wave function to “collapse,” or to ”branch,” or a history to become realized, or a property to actualize), I discuss the problem of the timing of the quantum measurement: Assuming that in an appropriate sense a measurement happens, when precisely does it happen? This question can be posed within most interpretations of quantum mechanics. By introducing the operator M, which measures whether or not the quantum measurement has happened, I suggest (...)
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  11. Carlo Rovelli (1991). Group Quantization of the Barbour-Bertotti Model. In A. Ashtekar & J. Stachel (eds.), Conceptual Problems of Quantum Gravity. Birkhauser. 2--292.
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  12. Carlo Rovelli (1991). Heisenberg Mechanics is the Good Mechanics. In A. Ashtekar & J. Stachel (eds.), Conceptual Problems of Quantum Gravity. Birkhauser. 2--126.
  13. Carlo Rovelli (1991). Is There Incompatibility Between the Ways Time is Treated in General Relativity and in Standard Quantum Mechanics. In A. Ashtekar & J. Stachel (eds.), Conceptual Problems of Quantum Gravity. Birkhauser. 126--140.
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