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  1. Carol A. Fowler (2013). An Ecological Alternative to a “Sad Response”: Public Language Use Transcends the Boundaries of the Skin. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):356-357.
    Embedding theories of language production and comprehension in theories of action-perception is realistic and highlights that production and comprehension processes are interleaved. However, layers of internal models that repeatedly predict future linguistic actions and perceptions are implausible. I sketch an ecological alternative whereby perceiver/actors are modeled as dynamical systems coupled to one another and to the environment.
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  2. Carol A. Fowler (2009). Speech Production. In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oup Oxford.
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  3. Bruno Galantucci, Carol A. Fowler & M. T. Turvey (2001). Event Coding as Feature Guessing: The Lessons of the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):886-887.
    The claim that perception and action are commonly coded because they are indistinguishable at the distal level is crucial for theories of cognition. However, the consequences of this claim run deep, and the Theory of Event Coding (TEC) is not up to the challenge it poses. We illustrate why through a brief review of the evidence that led to the motor theory of speech perception.
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  4. Lawrence Brancazio & Carol A. Fowler (2000). Merging Auditory and Visual Phonetic Information: A Critical Test for Feedback? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):327-328.
    The present description of the Merge model addresses only auditory, not audiovisual, speech perception. However, recent findings in the audiovisual domain are relevant to the model. We outline a test that we are conducting of the adequacy of Merge, modified to accept visual information about articulation.
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  5. Carol A. Fowler (1998). The Orderly Output Constraint is Not Wearing Any Clothes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):265-266.
    The orderly output constraint (OOC) is extraneous. Talkers “speak in lines” in its absence. Further, there is no perceptual motivation for an OOC; perceivers ignore the linearity between F2 at consonant-vowel onset and F2 in the vowel. In any case, the analogy with bat and barn owl localization systems underlying the theory is extreme, Sussman et al.'s comments to the contrary notwithstanding.
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  6. Rebecca Treiman & Carol A. Fowler (1991). Differences in Cohesiveness Among Different Types of Word-Initial Consonant Clusters. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):492-492.
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  7. Carol A. Fowler (1986). An Operational Definition of Conscious Awareness Must Be Responsible to Subjective Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):33.
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