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  1. Carol B. Schwalbe & David Cuillier (2013). Ethics Pedagogy 2.0: A Content Analysis of Award-Winning Media Ethics Exercises. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (3):175-188.
    A content analysis of 253 Great Ideas for Teachers (GIFTs) found that most of the 18 activities suitable for ethics courses relied on traditional methods of teaching, mainly discussions, teamwork, and case studies. Few used online technology, games, or simulations, compared with activities in other areas of journalism education. While most ethics ideas were designed to stimulate higher order learning, they were less likely than other GIFTs to incorporate varied elements that might improve student engagement. The authors make suggestions, based (...)
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  2. B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). "Secret" Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36 – 50.
    This study examined more than 2,500 war images from U.S. television news, newspapers, news magazines, and online news sites during the first five weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 and found that only 10% showed injury or death. The paper analyzes which media platforms were most willing to show casualties and offers insights on when journalists should use gruesome war images or keep them secret.
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  3. B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). “Secret” Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36-50.
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  4. Susan Keith, Carol B. Schwalbe & B. William Silcock (2006). Images in Ethics Codes in an Era of Violence and Tragedy. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):245 – 264.
    In an analysis of 47 U.S. journalism ethics codes, we found that although most consider images, only 9 address a gripping issue: how to treat images of tragedy and violence, such as those produced on the battlefields of Iraq, during the 2005 London bombings, and after Hurricane Katrina. Among codes that consider violent and tragic images, there is agreement on what images are problematic and a move toward green-light considerations of ethical responsibilities. However, the special problems of violence and truth (...)
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