Search results for 'Carol Gibb Harding' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Carol Gibb Harding (ed.) (1985/2010). Moral Dilemmas and Ethical Reasoning. Transaction Publishers.score: 870.0
    This book deals with moral dilemmas and the development of ethical reasoning in two senses.
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  2. Carol Gibb Harding (1985). Intention, Contradiction, and the Recognition of Dilemmas. In , Moral Dilemmas and Ethical Reasoning. Transaction Publishers.score: 870.0
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  3. Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding (1989). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 240.0
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  4. Anne Merriman & Richard Harding (2010). Pain Control in the African Context: The Ugandan Introduction of Affordable Morphine to Relieve Suffering at the End of Life. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):10.score: 60.0
    Dr Anne Merriman is the founder of Hospice Africa and Hospice Africa Uganda. She is presently Director of Policy and International Programmes. Here she tells the story of how HAU was founded. Dr Richard Harding is an academic researcher working on palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper described Dr Merriman's experience in pioneering palliative care provision. In particular it examines the steps to achieving wider availability of opioids for pain management for those with far advanced disease. Hospice Africa (...)
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  5. Sandra Harding (1991). Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking From Women's Lives. Cornell University.score: 60.0
    Sandra Harding here develops further the themes first addressed in her widely influential book, The Science Question in Feminism, and conducts a compelling analysis of feminist theories on the philosophical problem of how we know what we ...
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  6. Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.) (2003). Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this pioneering new book, Sandra Harding and Robert Figueroa bring together an important collection of original essays by leading philosophers exploring an extensive range of diversity issues for the philosophy of science and technology. The essays gathered in this volume extend current philosophical discussion of science and technology beyond the standard feminist and gender analyses that have flourished over the past two decades, by bringing a thorough and truly diverse set of cultural, racial, and ethical concerns to bear (...)
     
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  7. Sandra G. Harding (ed.) (2004). The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In the mid-1970s and early 1980s, several feminist theorists began developing alternatives to the traditional methods of scientific research. The result was a new theory, now recognized as Standpoint Theory, which caused heated debate and radically altered the way research is conducted. The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader is the first anthology to collect the most important essays on the subject as well as more recent works that bring the topic up-to-date. Leading feminist scholar and one of the founders of Standpoint (...)
     
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  8. Gregory Harding (1991). Color and the Mind-Body Problem. Review of Metaphysics 45 (2):289-307.score: 30.0
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  9. Sandra G. Harding (1977). Harman's Thoughts. Metaphilosophy 8 (January):62-71.score: 30.0
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  10. Mary Magada-Ward (2007). If Men Could Get Pregnant: Beth Singer and Carol Gilligan on Abortion. Metaphilosophy 38 (4):421-430.score: 21.0
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  11. Sophie Gibb (2006). Why Davidson is Not a Property Epiphenomenalist. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (3):407 – 422.score: 20.0
    Despite the fact that Davidson's theory of the causal relata is crucial to his response to the problem of mental causation - that of anomalous monism - it is commonly overlooked within discussions of his position. Anomalous monism is accused of entailing property epiphenomenalism, but given Davidson's understanding of the causal relata, such accusations are wholly misguided. There are, I suggest, two different forms of property epiphenomenalism. The first understands the term 'property' in an ontological sense, the second in a (...)
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  12. Gregory Harding (1997). Free Will and Determinism: Why Compatibilism is False. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 47 (3):311-349.score: 20.0
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  13. S. C. Gibb (2004). The Problem of Mental Causation and the Nature of Properties. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):464-75.score: 20.0
    Despite the fact that the nature of the properties of causation is rarely discussed within the mental causation debate, the implicit assumption is that they are universals as opposed to tropes. However, in recent literature on the problem of mental causation, a new solution has emerged which aims to address the problem by appealing to tropes. It is argued that if the properties of causation are tropes rather than universals, then a psychophysical reductionism can be advanced which does not face (...)
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  14. Sandra G. Harding (2004). A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality. Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.score: 20.0
    : Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  15. Sophie Gibb (2007). Is the Partial Identity Account of Property Resemblance Logically Incoherent? Dialectica 61 (4):539-558.score: 20.0
    According to the partial identity account of resemblance, exact resemblance is complete identity and inexact resemblance is partial identity. In this paper, I examine Arda Denkel's (1998) argument that this account of resemblance is logically incoherent as it results in a vicious regress. I claim that although Denkel's argument does not succeed, a modified version of it leads to the conclusion that the partial identity account is plausible only if the constituents of every determinate property are ultimately quantitative in nature.
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  16. Sandra Harding (2006). Two Influential Theories of Ignorance and Philosophy's Interests in Ignoring Them. Hypatia 21 (3):20-36.score: 20.0
    Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud provided powerful accounts of systematic interested ignorance. Fifty years ago, Anglo-American philosophies of science stigmatized Marx's and Freud's analyses as models of irrationality. They remain disvalued today, at a time when virtually all other humanities and social science disciplines have returned to extract valuable insights from them. Here the argument is that there are reasons distinctive to philosophy why such theories were especially disvalued then and why they remain so today. However, there are even better (...)
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  17. Bernice S. Elger & Timothy W. Harding (2006). Should Children and Adolescents Be Tested for Huntington's Disease? Attitudes of Future Lawyers and Physicians in Switzerland. Bioethics 20 (3):158–167.score: 20.0
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  18. Christine M. Korsgaard, A Reply to Carol Voeller and Rachel Cohon: “The Moral Law as the Source of Normativity” by Carol Voeller "The Roots of Reason" by Rachel Cohon.score: 18.0
    I am going to begin today by bringing together one of the themes of Carol Voeller’s remarks with one of the criticisms raised by Rachel Cohon, because I see them as related, and want to address them together. Voeller argues that the moral law is constitutive of our nature as rational agents. To put it in her own words, “to be the kind of object it is, is for a thing to be under, or constituted by, the laws which (...)
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  19. Cressida J. Heyes (1997). Anti‐Essentialism in Practice: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Philosophy. Hypatia 12 (3):142-163.score: 18.0
    Third wave anti-essentialist critique has too often been used to dismiss second wave feminist projects. I examine claims that Carol Gilligan's work is "essentialist," and argue that her recent research requires this criticism be rethought. Anti-essentialist feminist method should consist in attention to the relations of power that construct accounts of gendered identity in the course of different forms of empirical enquiry, not in rejecting any general claim about women or girls.
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  20. David Schweickart, "Stakeholders and Terrorists: On Carol Gould's Democratizing Globalization and Human Rights".score: 18.0
    There are many things in this book that I like. I like Gould's basic philosophical framework--her "social ontology" of human beings conceived of as individuals-in-relation-- which was developed in her earlier works, Marx's Social Ontology and Rethinking Democracy. I like her use of a feminist "ethic of care" throughout, even to ground human rights. This latter move is surprising in light of Carol Gilligan's provocative (and in my view insightful) contrast between an ethic of rights (characteristic of conventional male (...)
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  21. Christine James (1998). Hegel, Harding, and Objectivity. Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):111-122.score: 18.0
    Jean Hyppolite describes Hegel’s project in the Phenomenology of Spirit as “the development and formulation of natural consciousness and its progression to science, that is to say, to philosophic knowledge, to knowledge of the absolute” (Hyppolite 1974, 4). This development or progression is the “work of consciousness engaged in experience,” as phenomenal knowledge necessarily leads to absolute knowledge. Thus from the very nature of consciousness one is led toward the absolute, which is both substance as well as subject. This paper (...)
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  22. Alison Wylie (2008). Social Constructionist Arguments in Harding's Science and Social Inequality. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 201-211.score: 18.0
    Harding’s aim in Science and Social Inequality is to integrate the insights generated by diverse critiques of conventional ideals of truth, value freedom, and unity in science, and to chart a way forward for the sciences and for science studies. Wylie assesses this synthesis as a genre of social constructionist argument and illustrates its implications for questions of epistemic warrant with reference to transformative research on gender-based discrimination in the workplace environment.
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  23. Thomas I. White (1992). Business, Ethics, and Carol Gilligan's "Two Voices&Quot;. Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):51-61.score: 18.0
    This article argues that Carol Gilligan's research in moral development psychology, work which claims that women speak about ethics in a "different voice" than men do, is applicable to business ethics. This essay claims that Gilligan's "ethic of care" provides a plausible explanation for the results of two studies that found men and women handling ethical dilemmas in business differently. This paper also speculates briefly about the management implications of Gilligan's ideas.
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  24. Teresa Aguilar García (2011). Posmodern feminism D. J. Haraway and S. Harding. [Spanish]. Eidos 8:222-232.score: 18.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} In this text is characterized the “Postmodern. Feminism” and the theoretical positions of two influential contemporary thinkers in Philosophy of Science from a postmodern feminist perspective. Haraway and Harding debate around the History of Science and (...)
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  25. Carol Ekinsmyth (2002). 16 Feminist Methodology Carol Ekinsmyth. In Pamela Shurmer-Smith (ed.), Doing Cultural Geography. Sage. 177.score: 18.0
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  26. Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.) (2012). Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.score: 18.0
    This book arose out of a conference organised by the Fay Gale Centre for Research on Gender at The University of Adelaide honouring Carol Bacchi's work and is intended to make that work accessible to a range of audiences. - from the ...
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  27. John Coveney & Christine Putland (2012). Answering Bacchi: A Conversation About the Work and Impact of Carol Bacchi in Teaching, Research and Practice in Public Health. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.score: 18.0
     
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  28. John Coveney & Christine Putland (2012). Work and Impact of Carol Bacchi in Teaching. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press. 1071.score: 18.0
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  29. Carole Pateman (1980). Women, Nature, and the Suffrage:Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women's Movement in America 1848-1869. Ellen Carol DuBois; Separate Spheres: The Opposition to Women's Suffrage in Britain. Brian Harrison. [REVIEW] Ethics 90 (4):564-.score: 16.0
  30. Sharyn Clough (2008). Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues by Sandra Harding. Hypatia 23 (2):197-202.score: 15.0
  31. David J. Stump (2001). Theory and Practice of Feminist Postcolonial Science Studies: Sandra Harding's is Science Multicultural? Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):263-265.score: 15.0
  32. Gaile Pohlhaus (2002). Knowing Communities: An Investigation of Harding's Standpoint Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3):283 – 293.score: 15.0
  33. L. A. Whitt (1990). Book Review:Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science Sandra Harding, Merrill B. Hintikka. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 57 (3):542-.score: 15.0
  34. Susan Haack (1985). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology and Philosophy of Science Edited by S. Harding and M. B. Hintikka Dordrecht: Reidel, 1983, 322 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy 60 (232):265-.score: 15.0
  35. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2002). Critical Study of Carol Rovane's the Bounds of Agency. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1):229–240.score: 15.0
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  36. Robert Picciotto (2007). Does Foreign Aid Really Work? - By Roger C. Riddell, Foreign Aid: Diplomacy, Development, Domestic Politics - by Carol Lancaster. Ethics and International Affairs 21 (4):477–480.score: 15.0
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  37. Richard Brockhaus (1984). Review of Carol C. Gould's Marx's Social Ontology. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 10 (1):91-95.score: 15.0
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  38. Ingrid Bartsch (1999). Book Review: Sandra Harding. Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminisms, and Epistemologies. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (1):132-135.score: 15.0
  39. Richard Kyte (1996). Moral Reasoning as Perception: A Reading of Carol Gilligan. Hypatia 11 (3):97-113.score: 15.0
    Gilligan's understanding of moral reasoning as a kind of perception has its roots in the conception of moral experience espoused by Simone Weil and Iris Murdoch. A clear understanding of that conception, however, reveals grave difficulties with Gilligan's descriptions of the care perspective and justice perspective. In particular, we can see that the two perspectives are not mutually exclusive once we recognize that attention does not require attachment and that impartiality does not require detachment.
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  40. Kathleen Wallace (2000). Agency, Personhood, and Identity: Carol Rovane's The Bounds of Agency. Metaphilosophy 31 (3):311-322.score: 15.0
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  41. Robert C. Koons (2006). Bob and Carol and Tess and Ali. Sophia 45 (2):117-122.score: 15.0
    Conflicting religious experiences in different traditions do not necessarily <span class='Hi'>defeat</span> the rationality of conflicting beliefs sustained by those experiences in those traditions. The circularity that protects religious beliefs from such mutual <span class='Hi'>defeat</span> is not vicious. Moreover, the lack of ‘epistemological humility’ exhibited by such believers poses no threat to world peace. In fact, a campaign for compulsory humility would itself constitute a much greater threat.
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  42. Gabriele Lakomski (1989). Against Feminist Science: Harding and the Science Question in Feminism. Educational Philosophy and Theory 21 (2):1–11.score: 15.0
  43. Katherine Chambers (2010). Augustine and Roman Virtue – Brian Harding. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):641-643.score: 15.0
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  44. Christina M. Bellon (2007). Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights by Carol Gould. Hypatia 22 (4):206-209.score: 15.0
  45. Marya Schechtman (1999). Carol Rovane, The Bounds of Agency: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics:The Bounds of Agency: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics. Ethics 109 (4):919-922.score: 15.0
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  46. Joseph Bien (1980). A Review Of: Carol Gould,Marx's Social Ontology, MIT Press, 1978. [REVIEW] Human Studies 3 (1):291-301.score: 15.0
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  47. Sara Bernstein (2013). Review of Sophie Gibb, E. J. Lowe, and R. D. Ingthorsson (Eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1 (1):1.score: 15.0
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  48. John S. Dryzek (2005). Review of Carol C. Gould, Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (4).score: 15.0
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  49. William McBride (2006). Carol Gould's Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights. Radical Philosophy Today 2006:247-253.score: 15.0
    McBride offers a succinct summary of Gould’s book and ponders what the significance of theoretical discussions of the nature of human rights and degrees of democracy might be for our time when the U.S. government has descended into “barbarism” and made a sham out of anything resembling democracy. He concludes that Gould’s book is “first rate” as “a learned exercise in dreaming,” granting against his own deep pessimism that one can never know for sure that “dreams” may not turn out (...)
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  50. Colin McGinn (1994). Reply to Carol Rovane. Philosophical Studies 76 (2-3):169 - 174.score: 15.0
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