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  1. Carol Taylor (2013). What the Experience of Illness Teaches. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (1):45-49.
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  2. Carol A. Taylor (2013). Mobile Sections and Flowing Matter in Participant-Generated Video: Exploring a Deleuzian Approach to Visual Sociology. In Rebecca Coleman & Jessica Ringrose (eds.), Deleuze and Research Methodologies. Edinburgh University Press. 42.
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  3. Marion Danis, Adrienne Farrar, Christine Grady, Carol Taylor, Patricia O'Donnell, Karen Soeken & Connie Ulrich (2008). Does Fear of Retaliation Deter Requests for Ethics Consultation? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):27-34.
    BackgroundReports suggest that some health care personnel fear retaliation from seeking ethics consultation. We therefore examined the prevalence and determinants of fear of retaliation and determined whether this fear is associated with diminished likelihood of consulting an ethics committee.MethodsWe surveyed registered nurses (RNs) and social workers (SWs) in four US states to identify ethical problems they encounter. We developed a retaliation index (1–7 point range) with higher scores indicating a higher perceived likelihood of retaliation. Linear regression analysis was performed to (...)
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  4. Christine Grady, Marion Danis, Karen L. Soeken, Patricia O'Donnell, Carol Taylor, Adrienne Farrar & Connie M. Ulrich (2008). Does Ethics Education Influence the Moral Action of Practicing Nurses and Social Workers? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):4 – 11.
    Purpose/methods: This study investigated the relationship between ethics education and training, and the use and usefulness of ethics resources, confidence in moral decisions, and moral action/activism through a survey of practicing nurses and social workers from four United States (US) census regions. Findings: The sample (n = 1215) was primarily Caucasian (83%), female (85%), well educated (57% with a master's degree). no ethics education at all was reported by 14% of study participants (8% of social workers had no ethics education, (...)
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  5. Christine Grady, Marion Danis, Karen Soeken, Patricia O'Donnell, Carol Taylor, Adrienne Farrar & Connie Ulrich (2008). Response to Peer Commentary on “Does Ethics Education Influence the Moral Action of Practicing Nurses and Social Workers?”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):1-2.
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  6. Carole Anne Taylor (2003). An Ex-Charmer Gone in the Chest. Feminist Studies 29 (1):19.
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  7. Carolyn Taylor (2000). Practising Reflexivity in Health and Welfare: Making Knowledge. Open University.
     
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  8. Carol R. Taylor (1998). Reflections on "Nursing Considered as Moral Practice". Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (1):71-82.
    : This response to the preceding article by Gastmans, Dierckx de Casterle, and Schotsmans challenges the notion of "good care" as the ultimate goal of nursing practice, explores further the possible goals of nursing and how they may be identified, and presents six elements of professional caring along with their related virtues and moral obligations.
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  9. Carol R. Taylor (1997). Everyday Nursing Concerns: Unique? Trivial? Or Essential to Healthcare Ethics? [REVIEW] HEC Forum 9 (1):68-84.
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  10. Carole Anne Taylor (1993). Positioning Subjects and Objects: Agency, Narration, Relationality. Hypatia 8 (1):55 - 80.
    When assumed by positions of dominance, the impersonal, analytical perspectives of scholar-narrators may serve to flatten, simplify, or render invisible the differences of constructed Others. Strategies of resistance necessarily correspond to where narrator-subjects enter relations of power. Without the presence of Others' narrations, dominance can neither value newly visible subjective agency nor confront the complicity in its own subjectivity. Intersubjectivity suggests a dialogical process that utilizes differences in lived experience to reconceive relationality.
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  11. Carol Taylor (1990). Ethics in Health Care and Medical Technologies. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).
    In this paper a case is used to demonstrate how ethical analysis enables health care professionals, patients and family members to make treatment decisions which ensure that medical technologies are used in the overall best interests of the patient. The claim is made and defended that ethical analysis can secure four beneficial outcomes when medical technologies are employed: (1) not allowing any medical technologies to be employed until the appropriate decision makers are identified and consulted; (2) insisting that medical technologies (...)
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