Search results for 'Carole Brooks Platt' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Carole Brooks Platt (2007). Presence, Poetry and the Collaborative Right Hemisphere. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (3):36.score: 870.0
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  2. John R. Platt (1972). Amount of Training, Deprivation, and Variability of Chain Length as Determinants of Response-Velocity Gradients in Homogeneous Chains. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (2):191-197.score: 90.0
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  3. Carole Brooks Platt (2007). Presence, Poetry and the Collaborative Right Hemisphere. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (3):36-53.score: 87.0
  4. Rodney A. Brooks, How to Build Complete Creatures Rather Than Isolated Cognitive Simulators.score: 60.0
    Artificial Intelligence as a discipline has gotten bogged down in subproblems of intelligence. These subproblems are the result of applying reductionist methods to the goal of creating a complete artificial thinking mind. In Brooks (1987) 1 have argued that these methods will lead us to solving irrelevant problems; interesting as intellectual puzzles, but useless in the long run for creating an artificial being.
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  5. Colin M. Angle & Rodney A. Brooks, Small Planetary Rovers.score: 60.0
    We have previously built a small IKg ([Angle 89] and [Brooks 89]) six legged walking robot named Genghis. It was remarkably successful as a testbed to develop walking and learning algorithms. It encouraged us to build a more fully engineered robot with higher performance. We are building two copies of the robot, both 1.6Kg in mass. Their generic name is Attila. Attila has 24 actuators and over 150 sensors, all connected via a local network (the I2C bus) to 11 (...)
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  6. Ann Brooks (1997). Postfeminisms: Feminism, Cultural Theory, and Cultural Forms. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Once seen as synonymous with "anti-feminism" postfeminism is now understood as the theoretical meeting ground between feminism and anti-foundationalist movements such as postmodernism, post-structuralism and post-colonialsm. In this clear exposition of some of the major debates, theorists and practitioners, Ann Brooks shows how feminism is being redefined for the twenty first century. Individual chapters look at postfeminism in relation to feminist epistemology, Foucault, psychoanalytic theory and semiology, postmodernism and postcolonialism, cultural politics, popular culture, film and media, and sexuality and (...)
     
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  7. Thom Brooks (2007). Between Natural Law and Legal Positivism: Dworkin and Hegel on Legal Theory. Georgia State University Law Review 23 (3):513-60.score: 30.0
    In this article, I argue that - despite the absence of any clear influence of one theory on the other - the legal theories of Dworkin and Hegel share several similar and, at times, unique positions that join them together within a distinctive school of legal theory, sharing a middle position between natural law and legal positivism. In addition, each theory can help the other in addressing certain internal difficulties. By recognizing both Hegel and Dworkin as proponents of a position (...)
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  8. Thom Brooks (2004). Retributivist Arguments Against Capital Punishment. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):188–197.score: 30.0
    This article argues that even if we grant that murderers may deserve death in principle, retributivists should still oppose capital punishment. The reason? Our inability to know with certainty whether or not individuals possess the necessary level of desert. In large part due to advances in science, we can only be sure that no matter how well the trial is administered or how many appeals are allowed or how many years we let elapse, we will continue to execute innocent persons (...)
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  9. Rodney Brooks (1991). Intelligence Without Representation. Artificial Intelligence 47:139-159.score: 30.0
    Artificial intelligence research has foundered on the issue of representation. When intelligence is approached in an incremental manner, with strict reliance on interfacing to the real world through perception and action, reliance on representation disappears. In this paper we outline our approach to incrementally building complete intelligent Creatures. The fundamental decomposition of the intelligent system is not into independent information processing units which must interface with each other via representations. Instead, the intelligent system is decomposed into independent and parallel activity (...)
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  10. Thom Brooks (2009). The Problem with Polygamy. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):109-22.score: 30.0
    Polygamy is a hotly contested practice and open to widespread misunderstandings. This practice is defined as a relationship between either one husband and multiple wives or one wife and multiple husbands. Today, 'polygamy' almost exclusively takes the form of one husband with multiple wives. In this article, my focus will centre on limited defences of polygamy offered recently by Chesire Calhoun and Martha Nussbaum. I will argue that these defences are unconvincing. The problem with polygamy is primarily that it is (...)
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  11. Thom Brooks, Climate Change and Negative Duties.score: 30.0
    It is widely accepted by the scientific community and beyond that human beings are primarily responsible for climate change and that climate change has brought with it a number of real problems. These problems include, but are not limited to, greater threats to coastal communities, greater risk of famine, and greater risk that tropical diseases may spread to new territory. In keeping with J. S. Mill's 'Harm Principle', green political theorists often respond that if we are contributing a harm to (...)
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  12. Thom Brooks (2007). Punishing States That Cause Global Poverty. William Mitchell Law Review 33 (2):519-32.score: 30.0
    The problem of global poverty has reached terrifying proportions. Since the end of the Cold War, ordinary deaths from starvation and preventable diseases amount to approximately 250 million people, most of them children. Thomas Pogge argues that wealthy states have a responsibility to help those in severe poverty. This responsibility arises from the foreseeable and avoidable harm the current global institutional order has perpetrated on poor states. Pogge demands that wealthy states eradicate global poverty not merely because they have the (...)
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  13. David Brooks (2000). How to Solve the Hard Problem: A Predictable Inexplicability. Psyche 6 (4):5-20.score: 30.0
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  14. Thom Brooks (2003). Kant's Theory of Punishment. Utilitas 15 (02):206-.score: 30.0
    The most widespread interpretation amongst contemporary theorists of Kant's theory of punishment is that it is retributivist. On the contrary, I will argue there are very different senses in which Kant discusses punishment. He endorses retribution for moral law transgressions and consequentialist considerations for positive law violations. When these standpoints are taken into consideration, Kant's theory of punishment is more coherent and unified than previously thought. This reading uncovers a new problem in Kant's theory of punishment. By assuming a potential (...)
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  15. Thom Brooks (2006). Plato, Hegel, and Democracy. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 53:24-50.score: 30.0
    Nearly every major philosophy, from Plato to Hegel and beyond, has argued that democracy is an inferior form of government, at best. Yet, virtually every contemporary political philosophy working today - whether in an analytic or postmodern tradition - endorses democracy in one variety or another. Should we conclude then that the traditional canon is meaningless for helping us theorize about a just state? In this paper, I will take up the criticisms and positive proposals of two such canonical figures (...)
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  16. Thom Brooks (2009). A Critique of Pragmatism and Deliberative Democracy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):pp. 50-54.score: 30.0
    This paper offers two potential worries in Robert B. Talisse's A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy. The first worry is that is that the picture of democracy on offer is incomplete. While Talisse correctly argues that democracy is about more than elections, democracy is also about more than deliberation between citizens. Talisse's deliberative democracy is problematic to the degree its view of deliberation fails to account for democracy. The second worry we may have concerns the relationship between Talisse's Peircean pragmatism and (...)
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  17. D. M. Brooks, The Necessity of Atheism.score: 30.0
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  18. Thom Brooks, Publishing Advice for Graduate Students.score: 30.0
    Graduate students often lack concrete advice on publishing. This essay is an attempt to fill this important gap. Advice is given on how to publish everything from book reviews to articles, replies to book chapters, and how to secure both edited book contracts and authored monograph contracts, along with plenty of helpful tips and advice on the publishing world (and how it works) along the way in what is meant to be a comprehensive, concrete guide to publishing that should be (...)
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  19. Thom Brooks (2005). Hegel's Ambiguous Contribution to Legal Theory. Res Publica 11 (1):85-94.score: 30.0
    Hegel's legacy is particularly controversial, not least in legal theory. He has been classified as a proponent of either natural law, legal positivism, the historical school, pre-Marxism, postmodern critical theory, and even transcendental legal theory. To what degree has Hegel actually influenced contemporary legal theorists? This review article looks at Michael Salter's collection Hegel and Law. I look at articles on civil disobedience, contract law, feminism, and punishment. I conclude noting similarities between Hegel's legal theory and that of Ronald Dworkin. (...)
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  20. Thom Brooks, The Capabilities Approach, Religious Practices, and the Importance of Recognition.score: 30.0
    When can ever be justified in banning a religious practice? This paper focusses on Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach. Certain religious practices create a clash between capabilities where the capability to religious belief and expression is in conflict with the capability of equal status and nondiscrimination. One example of such a clash is the case of polygamy. Nussbaum argues that there may be circumstances where polygamy may be acceptable. On the contrary, I argue that the capabilities approach cannot justify polygamy in (...)
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  21. D. H. M. Brooks (1985). Strawson, Hume, and the Unity of Consciousness. Mind 94 (October):583-86.score: 30.0
  22. Rodney A. Brooks, Artificial Life and Real Robots.score: 30.0
    The first part of this paper explores the general issues in using Artificial Life techniques to program actual mobile robots. In particular it explores the difficulties inherent in transferring programs evolved in a simulated environment to run on an actual robot. It examines the dual evolution of organism morphology and nervous systems in biology. It proposes techniques to capture some of the search space pruning that dual evolution offers in the domain of robot programming. It explores the relationship between robot (...)
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  23. Thom Brooks (2004). A Defence of Jury Nullification. Res Publica 10 (4):401-423.score: 30.0
    In both Great Britain and the United States there has been a growing debate about the modern acceptability of jury nullification. Properly understood, juries do not have any constitutional right to ignore the law, but they do have the power to do so nevertheless. Juries that nullify may be motivated by a variety of concerns: too harsh sentences, improper government action, racism, etc. In this article, I shall attempt to defend jury nullification on a number of grounds. First, I discuss (...)
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  24. Thom Brooks (2001). Corlett on Kant, Hegel, and Retribution. Philosophy 76 (4):561-580.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this essay is to critically appraise J. Angelo Corlett's recent interpretation of Kant's theory of punishment as well as his rejection of Hegel's penology. In taking Kant to be a retributivist at a primary level and a proponent of deterrence at a secondary level, I believe Corlett has inappropriately wed together Kant's distinction between moral and positive law. Moreover, his support of Kant on these grounds is misguided as it is instead Hegel who holds such a distinction. (...)
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  25. Thom Brooks (2005). Kantian Punishment and Retributivism: A Reply to Clark. Ratio 18 (2):237–245.score: 30.0
    In this journal, Michael Clark defends a "A Non-Retributive Kantian Approach to Punishment". I argue that both Kant's and Rawls's theories of punishment are retributivist to some extent. It may then be slightly misleading to say that by following the views of Kant and Rawls, in particular, as Clark does, we can develop a nonretributivist theory of punishment. This matter is further complicated by the fact Clark nowhere addresses Rawls's views on punishment: Rawls endorses a mixed theory combining retributive and (...)
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  26. Thom Brooks, Moral Sentiments and the Justification of Punishment.score: 30.0
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  27. Thom Brooks (2002). Cosmopolitanism and Distributing Responsibilities. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (3):92-97.score: 30.0
    David Miller raises a number of interesting concerns with both weak and strong variants of cosmopolitanism. As an alternative, he defends a connection theory to address remedial responsibilities amongst states. This connection theory is problematic as it endorses a position where states that are causally and morally responsible for deprivation and suffering in other states may not be held remedially responsible for their actions. In addition, there is no international mechanism to ensure either that remedially responsible states offer assistance to (...)
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  28. D. H. M. Brooks (1994). The Method of Thought Experiment. Metaphilosophy 25 (1):71-83.score: 30.0
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  29. Thom Brooks (2006). Knowledge and Power in Plato's Political Thought. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):51 – 77.score: 30.0
    Plato justifies the concentration and exercise of power for persons endowed with expertise in political governance. This article argues that this justification takes two distinctly different sets of arguments. The first is what I shall call his 'ideal political philosophy' described primarily in the Republic as rule by philosopher-kings wielding absolute authority over their subjects. Their authority stems solely from their comprehension of justice, from which they make political judgements on behalf of their city-state. I call the second set of (...)
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  30. Richard Brooks (1969). The Meaning of 'Real' in Advaita Vedānta. Philosophy East and West 19 (4):385-398.score: 30.0
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  31. Bryan Adams, Rodney A. Brooks & Brian Scassellati, Humanoid Robots: A New Kind of Tool.score: 30.0
    In his 1923 play R.U.R.: Rossum s Universal Robots, Karel Capek coined robot as a derivative of the Czech robota (forced labor). Limited to work too tedious or dangerous for humans, today s robots weld parts on assembly lines, inspect nuclear plants, and explore other planets. Generally, robots are still far from achieving their fictional counterparts intelligence and flexibility. Humanoid robotics labs worldwide are working on creating robots that are one step closer to science fiction s androids. Building a humanlike (...)
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  32. Rodney Brooks (1991). Challenges for Complete Creature Architectures. In Jean-Arcady Meyer & Stewart W. Wilson (eds.), From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (Complex Adaptive Systems). Mit Press.score: 30.0
    boundaries. It is impossible to do good science without having an appreciation for the problems and concepts in the other levels of abstraction (at least in the direction from biology towards physics), but there are whole sets of tools, methods of analysis, theories and explanations within each discipline which do not cross those boundaries.
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  33. Thom Brooks (2008). Shame on You, Shame on Me? Nussbaum on Shame Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):322-334.score: 30.0
    abstract Shame punishments have become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional punishments, often taking the form of convicted criminals holding signs or sweeping streets with a toothbrush. In her Hiding from Humanity, Martha Nussbaum argues against the use of shame punishments because they contribute to an offender's loss of dignity. However, these concerns are shared already by the courts which also have concerns about the possibility that shaming might damage an offender's dignity. This situation has not led the courts to (...)
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  34. W. Kolodinsky Robert, A. Giacalone Robert & L. Jurkiewicz Carole (2008). Workplace Values and Outcomes: Exploring Personal, Organizational, and Interactive Workplace Spirituality. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2).score: 30.0
    Spiritual values in the workplace, increasingly discussed and applied in the business ethics literature, can be viewed from an individual, organizational, or interactive perspective. The following study examined previously unexplored workplace spirituality outcomes. Using data collected from five samples consisting of full-time workers taking graduate coursework, results indicated that perceptions of organizational-level spirituality (“organizational spirituality”) appear to matter most to attitudinal and attachment-related outcomes. Specifically, organizational spirituality was found to be positively related to job involvement, organizational identification, and work rewards (...)
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  35. Rodney A. Brooks, A Robot That Walks; Emergent Behaviors From a Carefully Evolved Network.score: 30.0
    Most animals have significant behavioral expertise built in without having to explicitly learn it all from scratch. This expertise is a product of evolution of the organism; it can be viewed as a very long term form of learning which provides a structured system within which individuals might learn more specialized skills or abilities. This paper suggests one possible mechanism for analagous robot evolution by describing a carefully designed series of networks, each one being a strict augmentation of the previous (...)
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  36. Thom Brooks, On the Importance of the Phenomenology's Preface.score: 30.0
    I want to raise the question of why we should give the Preface this special treatment. What do we <span class='Hi'>hope</span> to learn from such an extended examination of the Preface that will help further the study of Hegel's work beyond its present state? My comments will be limited to a few central issues, such as (a) the relationship between the Phenomenology and the system, (b) the Phenomenology as an introduction to the system, and (c) the Phenomenology as a ladder, (...)
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  37. D. H. M. Brooks (1992). Secondary Qualities and Representation. Analysis 52 (3):174-179.score: 30.0
    Secondary qualities have peculiarities which are thought to threaten physicalism. It is argued that these peculiarities are only to be expected in a physicalist universe in virtue of the essential characteristics of a representing device. Any device representing the world such as a camera will have depictional qualities. Secondary qualities are a subset of these.
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  38. Thom Brooks (2004). The Right to Trial by Jury. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):197–212.score: 30.0
    This article offers a justification for the continued use of jury trials. I shall critically examine the ability of juries to render just verdicts, judicial impartiality, and judicial transparency. My contention is that the judicial system that best satisfies these values is most preferable. Of course, these three values are not the only factors relevant for consideration. Empirical evidence demonstrates that juries foster both democratic participation and public legitimation of legal decisions regarding the most serious cases. Nevertheless, juries are costly (...)
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  39. Thom Brooks (2006). Ian Shapiro, The State of Democratic Theory:The State of Democratic Theory. Ethics 116 (2):442-444.score: 30.0
  40. Thom Brooks (2007). Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):329–331.score: 30.0
    This is a book review of Martha C. Nussbaum - "Hiding from Humanity".
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  41. Thom Brooks (2003). Does Philosophy Deserve a Place at the Supreme Court? Rutgers Law Record 27 (1):1-17.score: 30.0
    This Comment demonstrates that policy judgements are not masked by philosophical references, nor do philosophers play any crucial role in contentious judicial decisions. Neomi Rao’s study is flawed for many reasons: incomplete content analysis, poor assessment of data, and an inadequate definition of philosophy. She should be criticised for hypocritically praising Court philosopher references in some instances and not others, especially with regard to the Court’s early development. This Comment searched unsuccessfully for an instance where philosophers were cited just once (...)
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  42. Daniel R. Brooks, John Collier, Brian A. Maurer, Jonathan D. H. Smith & E. O. Wiley (1989). Entropy and Information in Evolving Biological Systems. Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):407-432.score: 30.0
    Integrating concepts of maintenance and of origins is essential to explaining biological diversity. The unified theory of evolution attempts to find a common theme linking production rules inherent in biological systems, explaining the origin of biological order as a manifestation of the flow of energy and the flow of information on various spatial and temporal scales, with the recognition that natural selection is an evolutionarily relevant process. Biological systems persist in space and time by transfor ming energy from one state (...)
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  43. D. H. M. Brooks (1986). Group Minds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (December):456-70.score: 30.0
  44. Thom Brooks (2004). Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy: Thinking Freedom by Will Dudley Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002, Pp. 326 + XVII. £45. [REVIEW] Philosophy 79 (1):149-153.score: 30.0
    This is a book review of Will Dudley, "Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy".
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  45. D. H. M. Brooks (1994). How to Perform a Reduction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):803-14.score: 30.0
  46. Cleanth Brooks (1965). Metaphor, Paradox, and Stereotype. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (4):315-328.score: 30.0
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  47. Thom Brooks (2006). Review of A. Raghuramaraju, Debates in Indian Philosophy: Classical, Colonial, and Contemporary. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (12).score: 30.0
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  48. David Brooks (2009). The Smoking Vegetarian. Angelaki 14 (2):129-137.score: 30.0
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  49. Thom Brooks (2008). A Two-Tiered Reparations Theory: A Reply to Wenar. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):666-669.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that Leif Wenar's theory of reparations is not purely forward-looking and that backward-looking considerations play an important role: if there had never been a past injustice, then reparations for the future cannot be acceptable. Past injustice compose the first part of a two-tiered theory of reparations. We must first discover a past injustice has taken place: reparations are for the repair of previous damage. However, for Wenar, not all past injustices warrant reparations. Once we have first passed (...)
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  50. D. H. M. Brooks (1983). Why Discrimination is Especially Wrong. Journal of Value Inquiry 17 (4):305-311.score: 30.0
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