11 found
Sort by:
  1. Carolyn R. Morillo (1995). Contingent Creatures: Reward Event Theory of Motivation. Rowman & Littlefield.
    What motivates behavior? What are the qualities of experience which make life worth living? Taking a new interdisciplinary approach, Morillo advances the theory that pleasure—interpreted as a distinct, separable, noncognitive quality of experience—is essential for all positive motivation and is the only intrinsic, nonmoral good in the lives of human beings and many other sentient creatures. Morillo supports her arguments with recent neuropsychological evidence concerning the role of reward centers in the brain and philosophical arguments for a naturalistic theory of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Carolyn R. Morillo (1992). Reward Event Systems: Reconceptualizing the Explanatory Roles of Motivation, Desire and Pleasure. Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):7-32.
    A developing neurobiological/psychological theory of positive motivation gives a key causal role to reward events in the brain which can be directly activated by electrical stimulation (ESB). In its strongest form, this Reward Event Theory (RET) claims that all positive motivation, primary and learned, is functionally dependent on these reward events. Some of the empirical evidence is reviewed which either supports or challenges RET. The paper examines the implications of RET for the concepts of 'motivation', 'desire' and 'reward' or 'pleasure'. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Carolyn R. Morillo (1990). The Reward Event and Motivation. Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):169-186.
    In philosophy, the textbook case for the discussion of human motivation is the examination (and almost always, the refutation) of psychological egoism. The arguments have become part of the folklore of our tribe, from their inclusion in countless introductory texts. [...] One of my central aims has been to define the issues empirically, so we do not just settle them by definition. Although I am inclined at present to put my bets on the reward-event theory, with its internalism, monism, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Carolyn R. Morillo (1985). Defining Duties and Constructing Morality. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 33:67-73.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Carolyn R. Morillo (1984). Epistemic Luck, Naturalistic Epistemology and the Ecology of Knowledge or What the Frog Should Have Told Dretske. Philosophical Studies 46 (1):109-129.
  6. Carolyn R. Morillo (1980). Reply to Gowen. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (3):434-435.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Carolyn R. Morillo (1979). Comments on Gorr and Green. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 28:125-134.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carolyn R. Morillo (1977). Current Periodical Articles. American Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Carolyn R. Morillo (1977). Doing, Refraining, and the Strenuousness of Morality. American Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):29 - 39.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Carolyn R. Morillo (1977). The Logic of Arguments From Contingency. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (3):408-417.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Carolyn R. Morillo (1976). As Sure as Shooting. Philosophy 51 (195):80 - 89.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation