Search results for 'Carrie Nolan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. Martin Nolan (1985). Lettera del Rev.mo P. Priore Generale OSA, P. Martin Nolan. Augustinianum 25 (1/2):9-9.score: 180.0
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  2. Daniel Nolan (2013). Why Historians (and Everyone Else) Should Care About Counterfactuals. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):317-335.score: 60.0
    Abstract There are at least eight good reasons practicing historians should concern themselves with counterfactual claims. Furthermore, four of these reasons do not even require that we are able to tell which historical counterfactuals are true and which are false. This paper defends the claim that these reasons to be concerned with counterfactuals are good ones, and discusses how each can contribute to the practice of history. Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-19 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9817-z Authors Daniel Nolan, School of (...)
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  3. Caroline West & Daniel Nolan (2004). Liberalism and Mental Mediation. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (2):186-202.score: 60.0
    Departments of Philosophy, University of St Andrews, Edgecliffe, The Scores, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, KY16 9AL, UK e-mail: Daniel.Nolan@st-andrews.ac.uk..
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  4. Daniel Nolan & Caroline West (2004). Liberalism and Mental Mediation. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (2):532-538.score: 60.0
    Departments of Philosophy, University of St Andrews, Edgecliffe, The Scores, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, KY16 9AL, UK e-mail: Daniel.Nolan@st-andrews.ac.uk..
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  5. Ann M. C. Nolan (2012). Vatican II: Changing the Style of Being Church. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (4):397.score: 60.0
    Nolan, Ann MC In the past fifty years there has been a stream of commentary on the documents of Vatican II. Have we not had so much commentary, so much interpretation, that further commentary is unnecessary? Fifty years on, one might ponder how to interpret the sixteen documents for the church of our times, indeed to wonder whether they continue to have any relevance at all. Faced with this thought, we could turn to one scholar whose works span almost (...)
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  6. Peter W. Nolan & Doreen Markert (2002). Ethical Reasoning Observed: A Longitudinal Study of Nursing Students. Nursing Ethics 9 (3):243-258.score: 60.0
    All nursing courses in the UK include ethics in the curriculum, although there is considerable variation in the content of ethics courses and the teaching methods used to assist the acquisition of ethical reasoning. The effectiveness of ethics courses continues to be disputed, even when the perceptions and needs of students are taken into account in their design. This longitudinal study, carried out in the UK, but with implications for nurse education in other developed countries, explored the ethical understanding of (...)
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  7. Daniel Nolan, Greg Restall & Caroline West (2005). Moral Fictionalism Versus the Rest. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (3):307 – 330.score: 30.0
    In this paper we introduce a distinct metaethical position, fictionalism about morality. We clarify and defend the position, showing that it is a way to save the 'moral phenomena' while agreeing that there is no genuine objective prescriptivity to be described by moral terms. In particular, we distinguish moral fictionalism from moral quasi-realism, and we show that fictionalism possesses the virtues of quasi-realism about morality, but avoids its vices.
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  8. Daniel Nolan (1996). Recombination Unbound. Philosophical Studies 84 (2-3):239 - 262.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the principle of recombination for possible worlds. It argues that arguments against unrestricted recombination offered by Forrest and Armstrong and by David Lewis fail, but a related argument is a challenge, and recommends that we accept an unrestricted principle of recombination and the conclusion that possible worlds form a proper class.
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  9. Daniel Nolan (2008). Truthmakers and Predication. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 4:171-192.score: 30.0
    To what extent do true predications correspond to truthmakers in virtue of which those predications are true? One sort of predicate which is often thought to not be susceptible to an ontological treatment is a predicate for instantiation, or some corresponding predication (trope-similarity or set-membership, for example). This paper discusses this question, and argues that an "ontological" approach is possible here too: where this ontological approach goes beyond merely finding a truthmaker for claims about instantiation. Along the way a version (...)
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  10. Daniel Nolan (2003). Defending a Possible-Worlds Account of Indicative Conditionals. Philosophical Studies 116 (3):215-269.score: 30.0
    One very popular kind of semantics for subjunctive conditionals is aclosest-worlds account along the lines of theories given by David Lewisand Robert Stalnaker. If we could give the same sort of semantics forindicative conditionals, we would have a more unified account of themeaning of ``if ... then ...'' statements, one with manyadvantages for explaining the behaviour of conditional sentences. Such atreatment of indicative conditionals, however, has faced a battery ofobjections. This paper outlines a closest-worlds account of indicativeconditionals that does better (...)
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  11. Daniel Nolan (2006). Vagueness, Multiplicity and Parts. Noûs 40 (4):716–737.score: 30.0
    There’s an argument around from so-called “linguistic theories of vagueness”, plus some relatively uncontroversial considerations, to powerful metaphysical conclusions. David Lewis employs this argument to support the mereological principle of unrestricted composition, and Theodore Sider employs a similar argument not just for unrestricted composition but also for the doctrine of temporal parts. This sort of argument could be generalised, to produce a lot of other less palatable metaphysical conclusions. However, arguments to Lewis’s and Sider’s conclusions on the basis of considerations (...)
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  12. Daniel Nolan, Hale's Dilemma.score: 30.0
    Bob Hale in Hale 1995b posed a dilemma for modal fictionalism (more specifically, Rosen's version of modal fictionalism). A modal fictionalist who maintains the version outlined in Rosen 1990 believes that the fiction of possible worlds (PW, to use Rosen and Hale's abbreviation) is not literally true. The question arises, however, about its modal status. Is it necessarily false, or contingently false? In either case, Hale argues, the modal fictionalist is in trouble. Should the modal fictionalist claim that the story (...)
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  13. Daniel Nolan, Is Stalnaker Inconsistent About Indicative Conditionals?score: 30.0
    Robert Stalnaker’s formal semantics for his indicative conditional (which his 1975 paper takes over from his 1968 paper and Stalnaker and Thomason 1968) validate modus ponens, as one might expect. But they do so at the cost of a tension between his philosophical remarks in his 1975 paper and his formal constraints. Stalnaker commits himself to the following: he defines a “context set” as “the possible worlds not ruled out by the presupposed background information” (Stalnaker 1975 p 142). He later (...)
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  14. Daniel Nolan (2009). Platitudes and Metaphysics. In David Braddon-Mitchell & Robert Nola (eds.), Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism. Mit Press.score: 30.0
    One increasingly popular technique in philosophy might be called the "platitudes analysis": a set of widely accepted claims about a given subject matter are collected, adjustments are made to the body of claims, and this is taken to specify a “role” for the phenomenon in question. (Perhaps the best-known example is analytic functionalism about mental states, where platitudes about belief, desire, intention etc. are together taken to give us a "role" for states to fill if they are to count as (...)
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  15. Daniel Nolan (1997). Quantitative Parsimony. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (3):329-343.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I motivate the view that quantitative parsimony is a theoretical virtue: that is, we should be concerned not only to minimize the number of kinds of entities postulated by our theories (i. e. maximize qualitative parsimony), but we should also minimize the number of entities postulated which fall under those kinds. In order to motivate this view, I consider two cases from the history of science: the postulation of the neutrino and the proposal of Avogadro's hypothesis. I (...)
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  16. Daniel Nolan (2009). Consequentialism and Side Constraints. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (1):5-22.score: 30.0
    Many people are inclined to think that consequences of actions, or perhaps reasonably expected consequences of those actions, have moral weight. Firing off shotguns in crowded areas is typically wrong, at least in part, because of the people who get maimed and killed. Committed consequentialists think that consequences (either actual consequences, or expected consequences, or intended consequences, or reasonably expected consequences, or maybe some other different shade) are all that matters, morally speaking. Lying and stealing are wrong, when they are (...)
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  17. Daniel Patrick Nolan (2002). Topics in the Philosophy of Possible Worlds. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This book discusses a range of important issues in current philosophical work on the nature of possible worlds. Areas investigated include the theories of the nature of possible worlds, general questions about metaphysical analysis and questions about the direction of dependence between what is necessary or possible and what could be.
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  18. Daniel Nolan (2006). Stoic Gunk. Phronesis 51 (2):162 - 183.score: 30.0
    The surviving sources on the Stoic theory of division reveal that the Stoics, particularly Chrysippus, believed that bodies, places and times were such that all of their parts themselves had proper parts. That is, bodies, places and times were composed of gunk. This realisation helps solve some long-standing puzzles about the Stoic theory of mixture and the Stoic attitude to the present.
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  19. C. S. Jenkins & Daniel Nolan (2008). Backwards Explanation. Philosophical Studies 140 (1):103 - 115.score: 30.0
    We discuss explanation of an earlier event by a later event, and argue that prima facie cases of backwards event explanation are ubiquitous. Some examples: (1) I am tidying my flat because my brother is coming to visit tomorrow. (2) The scarlet pimpernels are closing because it is about to rain. (3) The volcano is smoking because it is going to erupt soon. We then look at various ways people might attempt to explain away these prima facie cases by arguing (...)
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  20. Daniel Nolan (2007). Contemporary Metaphysicians and Their Traditions. Philosophical Topics 35 (1-2):1-18.score: 30.0
    When invited to consider the methodology of contemporary metaphysics, quite a number of procedures spring to mind as part of the metaphysician's toolkit. These include: eliciting and relying on intuitions; solving location problems and using “conceptual analysis”; inference to the best theory, both on internal metaphysical grounds and drawing from the theoretical reaches of the sciences; working on topics clearly close to, or even overlapping, those of other areas of inquiry using techniques of those other areas; achieving coherence with other (...)
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  21. Daniel Nolan, Modal Fictionalism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Questions about necessity (or what has to be, or what cannot be otherwise) and possibility (or what can be, or what could be otherwise) are questions about modality. Fictionalism is an approach to theoretical matters in a given area which treats the claims in that area as being in some sense analogous to fictional claims: claims we do not literally accept at face value, but which we nevertheless think serve some useful function. However, despite its name, “Modal Fictionalism” in its (...)
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  22. Lawrence Nolan (1997). The Ontological Status of Cartesian Natures. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):169–194.score: 30.0
    In the Fifth Meditation, Descartes makes a remarkable claim about the ontological status of geometrical figures. He asserts that an object such as a triangle has a 'true and immutable nature' that does not depend on the mind, yet has being even if there are no triangles existing in the world. This statement has led many commentators to assume that Descartes is a Platonist regarding essences and in the philosophy of mathematics. One problem with this seemingly natural reading is that (...)
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  23. Daniel Nolan (2007). A Consistent Reading of "Sylvan's Box". Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):667 - 673.score: 30.0
    I argue that Graham Priest's story 'Sylvan's Box' has an attractive consistent reading. Priest's hope that this story can be used as an example of a non-trivial 'essentially inconsistent' story is thus threatened. I then make some observations about the role 'Sylvan's Box' might play in a theory of unreliable narrators.
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  24. Lawrence Nolan (1998). Descartes' Theory of Universals. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):161-180.score: 30.0
  25. Daniel Nolan, The Varieties of Flirtatious Experience.score: 30.0
    In Jenkins’s groundbreaking analysis of flirtation (Jenkins 2006), she suggests that an act is an act of flirtation if, and only if, the following two conditions are satisfied: “First, the flirter should act with the intention to raise flirter/flirtee romance and/or sex to salience, in a knowing yet playful way. Second, he or she should believe that the flirtee can respond is in some significant way”. Jenkins also draws the useful distinction between flirtation proper and “flirtatious behaviour”: there is behaviour (...)
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  26. Daniel Nolan, What Would Teleological Causation Be?score: 30.0
    As is well known, Aristotelian natural philosophy, and many other systems of natural philosophy since, have relied heavily on teleology and teleological causation. Somehow, the purpose or end of an object can be used to predict and explain what that object does: once you know that the end of an acorn is to become an oak, and a few things about what sorts of circumstances are conducive to the attainment of this end, you can predict a lot about the sprouting (...)
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  27. Daniel Nolan, Individuals Enough for Classes.score: 30.0
    This paper builds on the system of David Lewis’s “Parts of Classes” to provide a foundation for mathematics that arguably requires not only no distinctively mathematical ideological commitments (in the sense of Quine), but also no distinctively mathematical ontological commitments. Provided only that there are enough individual atoms, the devices of plural quantification and mereology can be employed to simulate quantification over classes, while at the same time allowing all of the atoms (and most of their fusions with which we (...)
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  28. Daniel Nolan (1997). Three Problems for “Strong” Modal Fictionalism. Philosophical Studies 87 (3):259-275.score: 30.0
  29. Daniel Nolan (2004). Classes, Worlds and Hypergunk. The Monist 87 (3):303-321.score: 30.0
    The question of what truths are necessary in the broadest possible sense is a difficult one to answer, as is the question of what the limits are to what is possible. (Most people would see these two questions as different sides of the same coin, of course, since many think the question of what is possible is just the question of what is not necessarily ruled out). We have three general sorts of strategies for determining whether something is necessary (or (...)
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  30. Daniel Nolan (2006). Selfless Desires. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (3):665–679.score: 30.0
    final version in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2006 73.3: 665-679.
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  31. Daniel Nolan (2005). Fictionalist Attitudes About Fictional Matters. In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Clarendon Press. 204.score: 30.0
    A pressing problem for many non-realist1 theories concerning various specific subject matters is the challenge of making sense of our ordinary propositional attitude claims related to the subject in question. Famously in the case of ethics, to take one example, we have in ordinary language prima facie ascriptions of beliefs and desires involving moral properties and relationships. In the case, for instance, of “Jason believes that Kylie is virtuous”, we appear to have a belief which takes Kylie to be a (...)
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  32. Lawrence Nolan (1997). Reductionism and Nominalism in Descartes's Theory of Attributes. Topoi 16 (2):129-140.score: 30.0
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  33. Daniel Nolan & John O'Leary-Hawthorne (1996). Reflexive Fictionalisms. Analysis 56 (1):23–32.score: 30.0
  34. Lawrence Nolan & John Whipple (2005). Self-Knowledge in Descartes and Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):55-81.score: 30.0
  35. Daniel Nolan (2008). Properties and Paradox in Graham Priest's "Towards Non-Being". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):191 - 198.score: 30.0
    forthcoming in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
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  36. Daniel Nolan (1999). Is Fertility Virtuous in its Own Right? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (2):265-282.score: 30.0
    the virtues which are desirable for scientific theories to possess. In this paper I discuss the several species of theoretical virtues called 'fertility', and argue in each case that the desirability of 'fertility' can be explicated in terms of other, more fundamental theoretical virtues.
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  37. Daniel Nolan (1999). Michael Tooley, Time, Tense and Causation. Erkenntnis 50 (1):137-144.score: 30.0
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  38. Ishani Maitra & Daniel Nolan, Why Take Our Word for It?score: 30.0
    We find out a lot about the world through people telling us things. And we can (and do) come to know many of these things that people tell us, without running background checks to make sure that the tellers are reliable (in the sense that they are likely to know what they are talking about), or trustworthy (in the sense that they are likely to tell us what they know, rather than just whatever is easiest to say, or whatever would (...)
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  39. Lawrence Nolan, Malebranche's Theory of Ideas and Vision in God. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  40. Daniel Nolan, Comments on John Divers's “on the Significance of the Question of the Function of Modal Judgment”.score: 30.0
    The question of the function of modal judgement is an interesting philosophical issue, and John Divers's paper (this volume) has persuaded me that it has not received the attention it deserves. I think it is an important and interesting question even apart from any more ambitious claims that are made about its role in settling other issues about modality. Even if we became convinced that the story about function put no constraints whatsoever, epistemologically or metaphysically, on a theory of modality, (...)
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  41. Roderick M. Chisholm, John Corcoran, Jorge Gracia, L. S. Carrier, T. N. Pelegrinis, Alfred L. Ivry, D. S. Clarke, Leo Rauch, Robert Young, Michael J. Loux, Rita Nolan, Gerald Vision, E. D. Klemke, Ruth Anna Putnam, Edward S. Reed, Maurice Mandelbaum, John Wettersten & Rachel Shihor (1983). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 13 (1-2):359-362.score: 30.0
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  42. Daniel Nolan (2004). Charles S. Chihara, the Worlds of Possibility, Modal Realism and the Semantics of Modal Logic. Studia Logica 76 (3):443-446.score: 30.0
  43. Rita Nolan (1974). The Character of Writings by Artists About Their Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (1):67-73.score: 30.0
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  44. Rita Nolan (2001). An Ideational Account of Early Word Learning: A Plausibility Assessment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1114-1115.score: 30.0
    The theoretical framework of Bloom's account of child word learning is here assessed only for initial plausibility and neural plausibility. The verdict on both dimensions is low, largely due to the size and character of knowledge it is claimed that the child brings to the task. It is suggested that elements of constructivist accounts could profitably be drawn from to reduce this implausibility.
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  45. Patrick D. Nolan (2004). Ecological-Evolutionary Theory: A Reanalysis and Reassessment of Lenski's Theory for the 21st Century. Sociological Theory 22 (2):328-337.score: 30.0
    Gerhard Lenski's ecological-evolutionary theory of human societies, originally presented and tested in Power and Privilege (1966) and Human Societies (1970), makes a number of general and specific predictions about the impact of subsistence technology on the fundamental features of societies, as well as identifying constraints that the techno-economic heritage of currently industrializing societies continue to exercise on their development trajectories. This paper reviews the strategies adopted for presenting and for testing the theory, critically analyzes and extends some important results of (...)
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  46. Daniel Nolan (2010). Fearing Spouses in Aristotle's Ta Oikonomika. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):1-8.score: 30.0
    The work which the Loeb Classical Library classifies as book 3 of the Oikonomika attributed to Aristotle is a curious piece. It has come down to us only via medieval translations into Latin. (I will be quoting the Loeb text and translation except where noted.) It is not certain that it is by Aristotle: and it is not certain whether it is even a part of the work attributed to Aristotle in ancient times. For want of a better name, let (...)
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  47. Rita Nolan, Distinguishing Perceptual From Conceptual Categories.score: 30.0
    I The area between sensation and conceptualization is gray and confusing. Despite abundant philosophical and empirical research, results about how to understand this area that command widespread assent are very scarce. One contributory source to this impasse is the fact that, for mature and intact humans, the sensory, the perceptual, and the conceptual seem merged in consciousness. Perception is phenomenally so "cognitively penetrable" - so infused for humans by discursive understanding - that experimental and theoretical efforts to distinguish between it (...)
     
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  48. Matthew J. Czarny, Ruth R. Faden, Marie T. Nolan, Edwin Bodensiek & Jeremy Sugarman (2008). Medical and Nursing Students' Television Viewing Habits: Potential Implications for Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):1 – 8.score: 30.0
    Television medical dramas frequently depict the practice of medicine and bioethical issues in a strikingly realistic but sometimes inaccurate fashion. Because these shows depict medicine so vividly and are so relevant to the career interests of medical and nursing students, they may affect these students' beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions regarding the practice of medicine and bioethical issues. We conducted a web-based survey of medical and nursing students to determine the medical drama viewing habits and impressions of bioethical issues depicted in (...)
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  49. Patrick D. Nolan (2003). Toward an Ecological-Evolutionary Theory of the Incidence of Warfare in Preindustrial Societies. Sociological Theory 21 (1):18-30.score: 30.0
    Prompted by the lack of attention by sociologists and the challenge of materialist explanations of warfare in "precivilized" societies posed by Keeley (1996), this paper tests and finds support for two materialist hypotheses concerning the likelihood of warfare in preindustrial societies: specifically, that, as argued by ecological-evolutionary theory, dominant mode of subsistence is systematically related to rates of warfare; and that, within some levels of technological development, higher levels of "population pressure" are associated with a greater likelihood of warfare. Using (...)
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  50. Cathal J. Nolan (1993). The United States, Moral Norms, and Governing Ideas in World Politics: A Review Essay. Ethics and International Affairs 7 (1):223–239.score: 30.0
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