Search results for 'Cartesianism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. of Arnauld'S. Cartesianism (1995). Steven Nadler. In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press.score: 30.0
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  2. To Cartesianism (1995). Vincent Carraud. In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press. 110.score: 30.0
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  3. Bradley Rives (2009). Concept Cartesianism, Concept Pragmatism, and Frege Cases. Philosophical Studies 144 (2):211 - 238.score: 24.0
    This paper concerns the dialectal role of Frege Cases in the debate between Concept Cartesians and Concept Pragmatists. I take as a starting point Christopher Peacocke’s argument that, unlike Cartesianism, his ‘Fregean’ Pragmatism can account for facts about the rationality and epistemic status of certain judgments. I argue that since this argument presupposes that the rationality of thoughts turn on their content, it is thus question-begging against Cartesians, who claim that issues about rationality turn on the form, not the (...)
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  4. Michael Esfeld (1999). Holism in Cartesianism and in Today's Philosophy of Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 30 (1):17-36.score: 24.0
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more balanced judgement than the widespread impression that the changes which are called for in today's philosophy of physics and which centre around the concept of holism amount to a rupture with the framework of Cartesian philosophy of physics. I argue that this framework includes a sort of holism: As a result of the identification of matter with space, any physical property can be instantiated only if there is the whole (...)
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  5. Harrison Hall (1979). Intersubjective Phenomenology and Husserl's Cartesianism. Man and World 12 (1):13-20.score: 21.0
    Once Husserl has constituted the other ego in the "Fifth Meditation," he is able to add to his phenomenology the overall dimension of intersubjectivi- ty. Objects are no longer constituted simply as systematic correlates of my actual (presented) and po.ssible (appresented) perspectival views of them, but as correlates of the actual and possibly actual views of an open community of transcendental subjects to which I belong--that is, as co,rrelates of my actual (presented) view and the actual and possibly actual (appresented) (...)
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  6. Sebastian Luft (2004). Husserl's Theory of the Phenomenological Reduction: Between Life-World and Cartesianism. Research in Phenomenology 34 (1):198-234.score: 18.0
    on points that remain especially crucial, i.e., the concept of the natural attitude, the ways into the reduction (and their systematics), and finally the question of the “meaning of the reduction.” Indeed, in the reading attempted here, this final question leads to two, not necessarily related, focal points: a Cartesian and a Life-world tendency. It is my claim that in following these two paths, Husserl was consistent in pursuing two evident leads in his philosophical enterprise; however, he was at the (...)
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  7. Leslie MacAvoy (2001). Overturning Cartesianism and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion: Rethinking Dreyfus on Heidegger. Inquiry 44 (4):455 – 480.score: 18.0
    This essay critically engages Dreyfus's widely read interpretation of Heidegger's Being and Time . It argues that Dreyfus's reading is rooted in two primary claims or interpretative principles. The first - the Cartesianism thesis - indicates that Heidegger's objective in Being and Time is to overturn Cartesianism. The second - the hermeneutics of suspicion thesis - claims that Division II is supposed to suspect and throw into question the results of the Division I analysis. These theses contribute to (...)
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  8. Tad M. Schmaltz (2002). Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This is the first book-length study of two of Descartes's most innovative successors, Robert Desgabets and Pierre-Sylvain Regis, and of their highly original contributions to Cartesianism. The focus of the book is an analysis of radical doctrines in the work of these thinkers that derive from arguments in Descartes: on the creation of eternal truths, on the intentionality of ideas, and on the soul-body union. As well as relating their work to that of fellow Cartesians such as Malebranche and (...)
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  9. Giovanni Gellera (2013). The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):191-211.score: 18.0
    In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism. Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King's College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes. The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.
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  10. Steven Nadler (1988). Cartesianism and Port-Royal. The Monist 71 (4):573-584.score: 18.0
    Contrary to what appears to be popular belief, Port-Royal was not a bastion of cartesianism. In fact, Of all the port-Royalists of the seventeenth century, Only arnauld can be considered a cartesian in any interesting sense. Most of the others associated with the order were hostile to the new philosophy and actively campaigned against it, Believing it to pose a threat to piety and "true" religion. This can be seen by examining the writings of de sacy, Du vaucel, And (...)
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  11. Steven Nadler (1988). Cartesianism and Port-Royal in Descartes and His Contemporaries. The Monist 71 (4):573-584.score: 18.0
    CONTRARY TO WHAT APPEARS TO BE POPULAR BELIEF, PORT-ROYAL WAS NOT A BASTION OF CARTESIANISM. IN FACT, OF ALL THE PORT-ROYALISTS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, ONLY ARNAULD CAN BE CONSIDERED A CARTESIAN IN ANY INTERESTING SENSE. MOST OF THE OTHERS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ORDER WERE HOSTILE TO THE NEW PHILOSOPHY AND ACTIVELY CAMPAIGNED AGAINST IT, BELIEVING IT TO POSE A THREAT TO PIETY AND "TRUE" RELIGION. THIS CAN BE SEEN BY EXAMINING THE WRITINGS OF DE SACY, DU VAUCEL, AND (...)
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  12. Bijoy H. Boruah (forthcoming). Recalcitrant Quasi-Cartesianism in Recent Philosophy of Mind. Indian Philosophical Quarterly.score: 18.0
    Contemporary quasi-Cartesianism about mental phenomena is the view of the perspectival nature of consciousness and the inscrutability of phenomenal experience, both being first-person-centered. It adverts to the insusceptibility of mental phenomena to third-person-centered, scientific description and explanation, but does not sympathize with the ontology of substance dualism. This view finds its clearest manifestation in contemporary agnostic naturalism.
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  13. John Haugeland (2004). Social Cartesianism. In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter.score: 15.0
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  14. R. Matthew Shockey (2012). Heidegger's Descartes and Heidegger's Cartesianism. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):285-311.score: 15.0
    Abstract: Heidegger's Sein und Zeit (SZ) is commonly viewed as one of the 20th century's great anti-Cartesian works, usually because of its attack on the epistemology-driven dualism and mentalism of modern philosophy of mind or its apparent effort to ‘de-center the subject’ in order to privilege being or sociality over the individual. Most who stress one or other of these anti-Cartesian aspects of SZ, however, pay little attention to Heidegger's own direct engagement with Descartes, apart from the compressed discussion in (...)
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  15. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Coding Dualism: Conscious Thought Without Cartesianism or Computationalism.score: 15.0
    The principal temptation toward substance dualisms, or otherwise incorporating a question begging homunculus into our psychologies, arises not from the problem of consciousness in general, nor from the problem of intentionality, but from the question of our awareness and understanding of our own mental contents, and the control of the deliberate, conscious thinking in which we employ them. Dennett has called this "Hume's problem". Cognitivist philosophers have generally either denied the experiential reality of thought, as did the Behaviorists, or have (...)
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  16. Michael Murray (2006). Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.score: 15.0
    The existence and extent of animal suffering provides grounds for a serious evidential challenge to theism. In the wake of the Darwinian revolution, this strain of natural atheology has taken on substantially greater significance. In this essay we argue that there are at least four neo-Cartesian views on the nature of animal minds which would serve to deflect this evidential challenge.
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  17. Steven Crowell (2002). The Cartesianism of Phenomenology. Continental Philosophy Review 35 (4):433-454.score: 15.0
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  18. David Carr (1973). The "Fifth Meditation" and Husserl's Cartesianism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (1):14-35.score: 15.0
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  19. David Pears (1996). Wittgenstein's Criticism of Cartesianism. Synthese 106 (1):49 - 55.score: 15.0
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  20. Kenneth R. Westphal (2007). Kant's Anti-Cartesianism. Dialogue 46 (04):709-.score: 15.0
  21. Don Ihde (2012). 'Cartesianism' Redux or Situated Knowledges. Foundations of Science 17 (4):369-372.score: 15.0
    Postphenomenology, in a complementary role with other science studies disciplines, remains within the trajectory of those theories which reject early modern epistemology and metaphysics, including rejection of ‘subject’–‘object’ distinctions, and holds, instead, to an inter-relational, co-constitutive ontology. Here the critiques which sometimes echo vestiges of such early modern epistemology are counter-challenged.
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  22. B. Narahari Rao (1994). A Semiotic Reconstruction of Ryle's Critique of Cartesianism. W. De Gruyter.score: 15.0
    0. Introduction: the Propositional Model of Knowledge "Philosophers have not done justice to the distinction which is quite familiar to all of us between ...
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  23. Graeme R. Forbes (1997). Externalism and Scientific Cartesianism. Mind and Language 12 (2):196-205.score: 15.0
  24. Terry S. Kasely (1997). The Method of the Geometer: A New Angle on Husserl's Cartesianism. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 13 (2):141-154.score: 15.0
  25. Steven Vanden Broecke (2004). Astrological Reform, Calvinism, and Cartesianism: Copernican Astronomy in the Low Countries, 1550–1650. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):363-381.score: 15.0
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  26. Peter Anstey (2003). Review of Tad M. Schmaltz, Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (2).score: 15.0
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  27. Katharine J. Hamerton (2008). Malebranche, Taste, and Sensibility: The Origins of Sensitive Taste and a Reconsideration of Cartesianism's Feminist Potential. Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (4):533-558.score: 15.0
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  28. Bernard H. Baumrin (1967). Platonism and Cartesianism in the Philosophy of Ralph Cudworth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (1):91-94.score: 15.0
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  29. Eric P. Lewis (2007). Cartesianism Revisited. Perspectives on Science 15 (4):493-522.score: 15.0
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  30. Glenn Ross (2006). Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.score: 15.0
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  31. J. G. Cottingham (2006). Review of Tad Schmaltz (Ed.), Receptions of Descartes: Cartesianism and Anti-Cartesianism in Early Modern Europe. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (12).score: 15.0
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  32. James Street Fulton (1940). The Cartesianism of Phenomenology. Philosophical Review 49 (3):285-308.score: 15.0
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  33. Edward Slowik (1998). Cartesianism and the Kinematics of Mechanisms: Or, How to Find Fixed Reference Frames in a Cartesian Space-Time. Noûs 32 (3):364-385.score: 15.0
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  34. W. Soffer (1981). Husserl's Neo-Cartesianism. Research in Phenomenology 11 (1):141-158.score: 15.0
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  35. Tad M. Schmaltz (1999). What Has Cartesianism To Do with Jansenism? Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (1):37-56.score: 15.0
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  36. E. M. Adams (1956). Cartesianism in Ethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):353-366.score: 15.0
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  37. Celia Amorós, Ana Uriarte & Linda López McAlister (1994). Cartesianism and Feminism. What Reason Has Forgotten; Reasons for Forgetting. Hypatia 9 (1):147 - 163.score: 15.0
    This paper recovers and pays homage to the arguments in support of the equality of the sexes developed by the Seventeenth Century Cartesian philosopher François Poullain de la Barre (1647-1723).
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  38. Siep Stuurman (1997). Social Cartesianism: Francois Poulain de la Barre and the Origins of the Enlightenment. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (4):617-640.score: 15.0
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  39. Harry M. Bracken (1987). Problems of Cartesianism. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):89-90.score: 15.0
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  40. Tad M. Schmaltz (1995). Malebranche's Cartesianism and Lockean Colors. History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (4):387-403.score: 15.0
  41. Vincent Carraud (1987). The Relevance of Cartesianism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:69-81.score: 15.0
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  42. Val Dusek (2010). Review of Michael Eldred, The Digital Cast of Being: Metaphysics, Mathematics, Cartesianism, Cybernetics, Capitalism, Communication. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).score: 15.0
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  43. Alison Laywine (1996). Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony. Philosophical Books 37 (4):254-256.score: 15.0
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  44. Georges Rey (2013). L4 The Possibility of a Naturalistic Cartesianism Regarding Intuitions and Introspection. In Matthew C. Haug (ed.), Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory? Routledge. 243.score: 15.0
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  45. John W. Yolton (1966). The Downfall of Cartesianism, 1673–1712. By Richard A. Watson. Nijhoff, The Hague, 1966. (International Archives of the History of Ideas). Pp. 146, Fl. 22.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 5 (03):455-457.score: 15.0
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  46. E. J. Ashworth (1983). Problems of Cartesianism Thomas M. Lennon, John M. Nicholas, and John W. Davis, Editors McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas, Vol. 1 Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1982. Pp. 253. [REVIEW] Dialogue 22 (02):363-364.score: 15.0
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  47. Phillip D. Cummins (1985). Problems of Cartesianism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (1):103-109.score: 15.0
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  48. Emmanuel Faye (2005). The Cartesianism of Desgabets and Arnauld and the Problem of the Eternal Truths. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 2:193-209.score: 15.0
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  49. Review author[S.]: Luciano Floridi (1996). Followers of French Fashions: Neo-Cartesianism and Analytic Epistemology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):633-639.score: 15.0
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  50. H. A. S. Schankula (1984). Problems of Cartesianism. Philosophical Books 25 (3):140-141.score: 15.0
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