Search results for 'Carvaka' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Krishna Del Toso (2010). The Stanzas on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata in the Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):543-552.score: 24.0
    in Āryadevapāda’s Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi we find a problematic passage in which some Cārvāka theories are expounded. The problem here lies in the fact that, according to Āryadevapāda, the Cārvākas – who did not admit rebirth – would have upheld that happiness in this life can be gaind by worshipping gods and defeating demons. As the Cārvākas were materialists, the reference to gods and demons does not fit so much with their philosophical perspective. In this paper, by taking into account several passages (...)
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  2. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2012). Svabhāvavāda and the Cārvāka/Lokāyata: A Historical Overview. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (6):593-614.score: 24.0
    svabhāva (own being) and yadṛchhā (chance, accident) are named as two different claimants among others as the first cause (jagatkāraṇa) in the ŚvUp. But in later works, such as Aśvaghoṣa’s poems, svabhāva is synonymous with yadṛchhā and entails a passive attitude to life. Later still, svabhāva is said to be inhering in the Lokāyata materialist system, although in which sense—cosmic order or accident—is not always clearly mentioned. Svabhāva is also a part of the Sāṃkhya doctrine and is mentioned in the (...)
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  3. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2011). Two Obscure Sanskrit Words Related to the Cārvāka: Pañcagupta and Kuṇḍakīṭa. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (2):167-171.score: 24.0
    Two words, pañcagupta and kuṇḍakīṭa, are found in modern Sanskrit lexicons such as the Śabdakalpadruma, the Vācaspatya, the Sanskrit-Wörterbuch, and A Sanskrit English Dictionary. They are said to signify the Cārvāka philosophy and an expert in the Cārvāka philosophy respectively. Both the words have been taken from some twelfth-century Sanskrit kośas but no example of actual use is available. Nor do they occur in any earlier Sanskrit kośa, such as the Amarakośa and the Halāyudhakośa. The inference is that the words (...)
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  4. Krishna Del Toso (2010). The Stanzas on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata in the Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):543-552.score: 24.0
    In Āryadevapāda’s Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi we find a problematic passage in which some Cārvāka theories are expounded. The problem here lies in the fact that, according to Āryadevapāda, the Cārvākas—who did not admit rebirth—would have upheld that happiness in this life can be gained by worshipping gods and defeating demons. As the Cārvākas were materialists, the reference to gods and demons does not fit so much with their philosophical perspective. In this paper, by taking into account several passages from Pāli and Sanskrit (...)
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  5. Krishna Del Toso (2010). Book Review: Ramkrishna Bhattacharya, Studies on the Carvaka/Lokayata, Società Editrice Fiorentina, Firenze 2009, € 28,00; Indian Edition: Manohar Publishers, New Delhi 2010, Rs. 750. [REVIEW] Psyche and Society 8 (2):81-84.score: 21.0
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  6. J. Muir (1990). Verses Illustrating the Cārvāka Tenets. In Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya & Mrinalkanti Gangopadhyaya (eds.), Cārvāka/Lokāyata: An Anthology of Source Materials and Some Recent Studies. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with R̥ddhi-India, Calcutta. 351--68.score: 18.0
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  7. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2002). Cārvāka Fragments: A New Collection. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (6):597-640.score: 15.0
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  8. Pradeep P. Gokhale (1993). The Cārvāka Theory of Pramāṇas: A Restatement. Philosophy East and West 43 (4):675-682.score: 15.0
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  9. Rāmakr̥shṇa Bhaṭṭācārya (2009). Studies on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata. Società Editrice Fiorentina.score: 15.0
     
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  10. Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya & Mrinalkanti Gangopadhyaya (eds.) (1990). Cārvāka/Lokāyata: An Anthology of Source Materials and Some Recent Studies. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with R̥ddhi-India, Calcutta.score: 15.0
     
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  11. Bijayanada Kar (1997). Sabda Pramana From the Carvaka. In Dilip Kumar Chakraborty (ed.), Perspectives in Contemporary Philosophy. Ajanta Publications. 162.score: 15.0
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  12. Martin Sevilla Rodriguez (2006). The Etiology of the Indian Materialist Carvaka in the'Mahabharata'. Pensamiento 62 (233):321-328.score: 15.0
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  13. Vidyāsāgara Siṃha (2011). Cārvaka Evaṃ Hyūma: Eka Tulanātmaka Adhyayana. Minarvā Pablikeśana.score: 15.0
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  14. Krishna Del Toso (forthcoming). Tutto in Questa Vita: Considerazioni Sull’Etica E la Morale Dei Cārvāka/Lokāyata. In Krishna Del Toso & Pietro Piro (eds.), Perché guardare a Oriente? Prospettive, risorse e visioni di un mondo non più lontano. Tipheret Editore.score: 15.0
  15. Krishna Del Toso (2012). tebhyaś caitanyaṃ: il “sé” secondo il Materialismo indiano. In Alessandra Cislaghi & Krishna Del Toso (eds.), Intrecci filosofici. Pensare il sé a Oriente e a Occidente. Ed. Mimesis.score: 9.0
    Ciò che qui chiamo Materialismo indiano non deve intendersi come scuola filosofica unica ed univocamente impostata, bensì come insieme di correnti di pensiero, propugnanti differenti punti di vista, ma tutte collocate entro l’orizzonte concettuale che nega ciò che in Occidente si usa chiamare Trascendente. Inoltre, com’è ovvio, bisogna distinguere tra un Materialismo filosofico – che prenderò in considerazione qui – ed un Materialismo, per così dire, popolare – al quale mi riferirò solo se necessario. Due sono le impostazioni materialiste che (...)
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  16. Krishna Del Toso (2011). Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa’s Position Against Nyāya and Vaiśeṣika. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):48-56.score: 9.0
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cārvāka thinker Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas, cognition is an attribute entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body for manifesting itself. Therefore, he seems to describe cognition according to a double ontology: it is (...)
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  17. Krishna Del Toso (2011). The Wolf’s Footprints: Indian Materialism in Perspective. An Annotated Conversation with Ramkrishna Bhattacharya. AION 71:183-204.score: 9.0
    An interview with Ramkrishna Bhattacharya on Cārvāka/Lokāyata philosophy.
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  18. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2010). Commentators on the Cārvākasūtra: A Critical Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):419-430.score: 9.0
    In spite of the fact that the mūla-text of the Cārvākasūtra is lost, we have some 30 fragments of the commentaries written by no fewer than four commentators, namely, Kambalāśvatara, Purandara, Aviddhakarṇa, and Udbhaṭa. The existence of other commentators too has been suggested, of whom only one name is mentioned: Bhāvivikta. Unfortunately no extract from his work is quoted anywhere. The position of the Cārvākas was nearer the Buddhists (who admitted both perception and inference) than any other philosophical system. But (...)
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  19. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2013). Verses Attributed to Bṛhaspati in the Sarvadarśanasaṃgraha: A Critical Appraisal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (6):615-630.score: 9.0
    Sāyaṇa-Mādhava closed his exposition of the Cārvāka philosophy in his Sarva-darśana-saṃgraha, Chap. 1 by quoting 11 and a half verses, the authorship of all of which was attributed to Bṛhaspati, the eponymous founder of materialism in India. One of these verses is presumably taken from the Viṣṇupurāṇa. However, it is not Bṛhaspati but some demons, deluded by a Jain and a Buddhist monk, who say this. Bṛhaspati does not appear at all in this Purāṇa. Variant versions of the same story (...)
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  20. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2010). What the Cārvākas Originally Meant. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):529-542.score: 8.0
    This essay proposes to review the problems of reconstructing and interpreting ancient texts, particularly philosophical commentaries, in the context of the Cārvāka/Lokāyata system of India. Following an overview of the Indian philosophical text tradition and the ontological and epistemological positions of the Cārvākas, three cases are discussed: (1) when there is no invariance in the text and the commentary, (2) when commentators differ among themselves in their interpretations, and (3) when contradictory interpretations are offered. The paper further discusses why certain (...)
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  21. C. Mackenzie Brown (2012). Conciliation, Conflict, or Complementarity: Responses to Three Voices in the Hinduism and Science Discourse. Zygon 47 (3):608-623.score: 3.0
    Abstract This essay is a response to three review articles on two recently published books dealing with aspects of Hinduism and science: Jonathan Edelmann's Hindu Theology and Biology: The Bhāgavata Purāṇa and Contemporary Theory, and my own, Hindu Perspectives on Evolution: Darwin, Dharma and Design. The task set by the editor of Zygon for the three reviewers was broad: they could make specific critiques of the two books, or they could use them as starting points to engage in a broad (...)
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  22. John M. Koller (1977). Skepticism in Early Indian Thought. Philosophy East and West 27 (2):155-164.score: 3.0
    The purpose of the article is to examine the development of skepticism in indian philosophical thought. A number of important vedic passages are analyzed in order to show that although the authors were concerned with questions about the origins and guarantees of knowledge claims, There was no developed philosophical skepticism in the vedic age. The skepticism of purandara is examined to illustrate the carvaka position. Jayarasi bhatta's thorough-Going skepticism is examined to show that complete skepticism is self-Contradictory--It involves claiming (...)
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  23. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.score: 3.0
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  24. Toso Krishna Del (2011). Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhatabhatta's Position Against Nyāya and Vaisesika. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):48.score: 3.0
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cār-vāka thinker Udbhatabhatta to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas cognition is an attribute entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhatabhatta cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body to manifest itself and for this very reason it is said to be a peculiarity of (...)
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  25. Daya Krishna (1991). Indian Philosophy: A Counter Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    Most writings on Indian philosophy assume that its central concern is with moska, that the Vedas along with the Upanishadic texts are at its root and that it consists of six orthodox systems knowns as Mimamasa, Vedanta, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Samkhya, and Yoga, on the one hand and three unorthodox systems: Buddhism, Jainism and Carvaka, on the other. Besides these, they accept generally the theory of Karma and the theory of Purusartha as parts of what the Indian tradition thinks about (...)
     
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  26. Anil Kumar Sarkar (1980). Dynamic Facets of Indian Thought. Manohar.score: 3.0
    v. 1. Vedas to the auxiliary scriptures -- v. 2. Three non-Vedic systems : Cārvāka, Jaina, and Buddha -- v. 4. Western impact on Indian thought.
     
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  27. Jayadeva Vedālaṅkāra (2002). Bhāratīya Darśanaśāstra Kā Itihāsa =. Nyū Bhāratīya Buka Kôrporeśana.score: 3.0
    1. Veda, Sāṅkhya, aura Yoga -- 2. Nyāya-vaiśeṣika -- 3. Mīmāṃsā vedānta-Bhagavadgītā, Cārvāka Bauddha, aura Jaina -- 4. Madhyakālīna ācāryoṃ kā darśana : Ācārya Śaṅkara, Rāmānuja, Ācārya Madhva, Ballabha, aura Caitanya bhakti -- 5. Dharma, samāja, āyurveda, rājanīti, vijñāna, aura śikshā darśana.
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