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Casey Perin [10]Casey Carlton Perin [1]
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Profile: Casey Perin (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
  1. Casey Perin (2014). Scepticism, Truth, and Value: A Reply to Brennan. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 4 (1):51-62.
    In response to Tad Brennan’s critical notice of The Demands of Reason, I offer further arguments in defense of the distinction between appearance and belief, the claim that truth for its own sake is the Pyrrhonist’s goal, and the centrality of the rationalist interpretation of Sextus’s work.
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  2. Casey Perin (2013). Making Sense of Arcesilaus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:313.
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  3. Casey Perin (2012). Knowledge, Stability, and Virtue in the Meno. Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):15-34.
  4. Casey Perin (2010). Scepticism and Belief. In Richard Arnot Home Bett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism. Cambridge University Press
  5. Casey Perin (2010). The Demands of Reason: An Essay on Pyrrhonian Scepticism. Oxford University Press.
    Perin argues that theSceptic is engaged in the search for truth and that since this is so, the Sceptic aims to satisfy certain basic rational requirements.
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  6. Casey Perin (2007). Substantial Universals in Aristotle's Categories. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:125-143.
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  7. Casey Perin (2006). Pyrrhonian Scepticism and the Search for Truth. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:337-360.
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  8. Casey Perin (2006). Review of Cicero, Charles Brittain (Trans.), Cicero, on Academic Scepticism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (10).
  9. Casey Perin (2005). Academic Arguments for the Indiscernibility Thesis. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):493-517.
    The Academics offered an argument from twins or perceptually indiscernible objects and an argument from dreams or madness in support of the indiscernibility thesis: that every true perceptual impression is such that some false impression just like it is possible. I claim that these arguments, unlike modern sceptical arguments, are supposed to establish mere counterfactual rather than epistemic possibilities. They purport to show that for any true perceptual impression j, there are a number of alternative causal histories j might have (...)
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  10. Casey Perin (2005). Stoic Epistemology and the Limits of Externalism. Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):383-401.