Search results for 'Categorical perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):439-462.
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make (...)
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  2.  6
    Luis Emilio Bruni (2008). Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes. Biosemiotics 1 (1):113-130.
    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception–cognition–action and it has not been considered the possibility to extend this kind of phenomena to the mere physiological level. To generalise the notion of CP in this sense, I have proposed to distinguish between categorical perception (...)
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  3.  2
    Kevin J. Holmes & Terry Regier (2016). Categorical Perception Beyond the Basic Level: The Case of Warm and Cool Colors. Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    Categories can affect our perception of the world, rendering between-category differences more salient than within-category ones. Across many studies, such categorical perception has been observed for the basic-level categories of one's native language. Other research points to categorical distinctions beyond the basic level, but it does not demonstrate CP for such distinctions. Here we provide such a demonstration. Specifically, we show CP in English speakers for the non-basic distinction between “warm” and “cool” colors, claimed to represent (...)
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  4.  48
    Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color: Assessing the Role of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):439-462.
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make (...)
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  5.  4
    James Kopp & James Livermore (1973). Differential Discriminability of Response Bias? A Signal Detection Analysis for Categorical Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):179.
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  6.  9
    Jennifer M. B. Fugate (2013). Categorical Perception for Emotional Faces. Emotion Review 5 (1):84-89.
    Categorical perception (CP) refers to how similar things look different depending on whether they are classified as the same category. Many studies demonstrate that adult humans show CP for human emotional faces. It is widely debated whether the effect can be accounted for solely by perceptual differences (structural differences among emotional faces) or whether additional perceiver-based conceptual knowledge is required. In this review, I discuss the phenomenon of CP and key studies showing CP for emotional faces. I then (...)
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  7.  19
    Stevan Harnad & Stephen J. Hanson, Learned Categorical Perception in Neural Nets: Implications for Symbol Grounding.
    After people learn to sort objects into categories they see them differently. Members of the same category look more alike and members of different categories look more different. This phenomenon of within-category compression and between-category separation in similarity space is called categorical perception (CP). It is exhibited by human subjects, animals and neural net models. In backpropagation nets trained first to auto-associate 12 stimuli varying along a onedimensional continuum and then to sort them into 3 categories, CP arises (...)
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  8.  14
    Stevan Harnad & SJ Hanson, Categorical Perception and the Evolution of Supervised Learning in Neural Nets.
    Some of the features of animal and human categorical perception (CP) for color, pitch and speech are exhibited by neural net simulations of CP with one-dimensional inputs: When a backprop net is trained to discriminate and then categorize a set of stimuli, the second task is accomplished by "warping" the similarity space (compressing within-category distances and expanding between-category distances). This natural side-effect also occurs in humans and animals. Such CP categories, consisting of named, bounded regions of similarity space, (...)
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  9.  10
    Radek Ocelák (2016). Categorical Perception” and Linguistic Categorization of Color. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (1):55-70.
    This paper offers a conceptual clarification of the phenomenon commonly referred to as categorical perception of color, both in adults and in infants. First, I argue against the common notion of categorical perception as involving a distortion of the perceptual color space. The effects observed in the categorical perception research concern categorical discrimination performance and the underlying processing; they need not directly reflect the relations of color similarity and difference. Moreover, the methodology of (...)
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  10.  22
    William Bechtel (1988). Studies of Categorization: A Review Essay of Neisser's 'Concepts and Conceptual Development' and Hamad's 'Categorical Perception'. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):381-389.
    Concepts and Conceptual Development: Ecological and Intellectual Factors in Categorization ULRIC NEISSER, 1987 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press x+384 pp., $39.50 Categorical Perception STEVAN HARNAD, 1987 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press x+599 pp., $59.50.
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  11. Tyler J. Burleigh & Jordan R. Schoenherr (2015). A Reappraisal of the Uncanny Valley: Categorical Perception or Frequency-Based Sensitization? Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  12.  31
    Stevan Harnad (2003). Categorical Perception. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group 67--4.
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  13. Han Wu, Xiaohui Ma, Linjun Zhang, Youyi Liu, Yang Zhang & Hua Shu (2015). Musical Experience Modulates Categorical Perception of Lexical Tones in Native Chinese Speakers. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  14.  5
    Debi Roberson, Hyensou Pak & J. Richard Hanley (2008). Categorical Perception of Colour in the Left and Right Visual Field is Verbally Mediated: Evidence From Korean. Cognition 107 (2):752-762.
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  15.  5
    Nancy L. Etcoff & John J. Magee (1992). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions. Cognition 44 (3):227-240.
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  16.  1
    Debi Roberson, Hyensou Pak & J. Richard Hanley (2008). Categorical Perception of Colour in the Left and Right Visual Field is Verbally Mediated: Evidence From Korean. Cognition 107 (2):752-762.
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  17.  36
    Stevan Harnad, Psychophysical and Cognitive Aspects of Categorical Perception:A Critical Overview.
    There are many entry points into the problem of categorization. Two particularly important ones are the so-called top-down and bottom-up approaches. Top-down approaches such as artificial intelligence begin with the symbolic names and descriptions for some categories already given; computer programs are written to manipulate the symbols. Cognitive modeling involves the further assumption that such symbol-interactions resemble the way our brains do categorization. An explicit expectation of the top-down approach is that it will eventually join with the bottom-up approach, which (...)
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  18. Daniel Joseph Navarro, Michael David Lee & H. C. Nikkerud (forthcoming). Learned Categorical Perception for Natural Faces. Cognitive Science.
     
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  19.  4
    Leslie A. Notman, Paul T. Sowden & Emre Özgen (2005). The Nature of Learned Categorical Perception Effects: A Psychophysical Approach. Cognition 95 (2):B1-B14.
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  20.  14
    Nicolas Vermeulen, Olivier Luminet, Mariana Cordovil de Sousa & Salvatore Campanella (2008). Categorical Perception of Anger is Disrupted in Alexithymia: Evidence From a Visual ERP Study. Cognition and Emotion 22 (6):1052-1067.
  21. Kevin J. Holmes & Phillip Wolff (2012). Does Categorical Perception in the Left Hemisphere Depend on Language? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):439-443.
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  22.  5
    Roger K. R. Thompson & David L. Oden (2000). Categorical Perception and Conceptual Judgments by Nonhuman Primates: The Paleological Monkey and the Analogical Ape. Cognitive Science 24 (3):363-396.
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  23.  4
    Beatrice de Gelder, Jan-Pieter Teunisse & Philip J. Benson (1997). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions: Categories and Their Internal Structure. Cognition and Emotion 11 (1):1-23.
  24.  3
    Frances Le Cornu Knight, Matthew R. Longo & Andrew J. Bremner (2014). Categorical Perception of Tactile Distance. Cognition 131 (2):254-262.
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  25.  10
    Andrew T. Hendrickson, George Kachergis, Todd M. Gureckis & Robert L. Goldstone (2010). Is Categorical Perception Really Verbally Mediated Perception? In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
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  26.  15
    Willy Serniclaes, Paulo Ventura, José Morais & Régine Kolinsky (2005). Categorical Perception of Speech Sounds in Illiterate Adults. Cognition 98 (2):B35-B44.
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  27.  1
    Wan-Ting Huang, Chang Liu, Qi Dong & Yun Nan (2015). Categorical Perception of Lexical Tones in Mandarin-Speaking Congenital Amusics. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  28.  8
    David Bimler & John Kirkland (2001). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions of Emotion: Evidence From Multidimensional Scaling. Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):633-658.
  29.  10
    Robert G. Crowder (1989). Categorical Perception of Speech: A Largely Dead Horse, Surpassingly Well Kicked. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):760.
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  30.  6
    Fiona N. Newell & Heinrich H. Bülthoff (2002). Categorical Perception of Familiar Objects. Cognition 85 (2):113-143.
  31.  12
    Stephen Andrew Butterfill, Categorical Perception : Not What It Seems.
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  32.  2
    Robert L. Goldstone, Mark Steyvers & Kenneth Larimer (1996). Categorical Perception of Novel Dimensions. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum 243--248.
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  33.  7
    Anna Franklin (2009). Pre-Linguistic Categorical Perception of Colour Cannot Be Explained by Colour Preference: Response to Roberson and Hanley. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (12):501-502.
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  34.  1
    Craig T. Palmer, B. Eric Fredrickson & Christopher F. Tilley (1996). Group Selection or Categorical Perception? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):780.
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  35. James A. Anderson, Jack W. Silverstein, Stephen A. Ritz & Randall S. Jones (1977). Distinctive Features, Categorical Perception, and Probability Learning: Some Applications of a Neural Model. Psychological Review 84 (5):413-451.
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  36.  1
    Stephen McCullough & Karen Emmorey (2009). Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions. Cognition 110 (2):208-221.
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  37. Neil A. Macmillan, Howard L. Kaplan & C. Douglas Creelman (1977). The Psychophysics of Categorical Perception. Psychological Review 84 (5):452-471.
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  38. Michel Treisman (1999). There Are Two Types of Psychometric Function: A Theory of Cue Combination in the Processing of Complex Stimuli with Implications for Categorical Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 128 (4):517.
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  39.  17
    James M. Beale & Frank C. Keil (1995). Categorical Effects in the Perception of Faces. Cognition 57 (3):217-239.
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  40. Yoshi-Taka Matsuda, Tomomi Fujimura, Kentaro Katahira, Masato Okada, Kenichi Ueno, Kang Cheng & Kazuo Okanoya (2013). The Implicit Processing of Categorical and Dimensional Strategies: An fMRI Study of Facial Emotion Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  41. Emre Özgen & Ian R. L. Davies (2002). Acquisition of Categorical Color Perception: A Perceptual Learning Approach to the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (4):477-493.
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  42.  26
    Mohan Matthen (2005). Is Color Perception Really Categorical? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):504-505.
    Are color categories the evolutionary product of their usefulness in communication, or is this an accidental benefit they give us? It is argued here that embodiment constraints on color categorization suggest that communication is an add-on at best. Thus, the Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) model may be important in explaining coordination, but only at the margin. Furthermore, the concentration on discrimination is questionable: coclassification is at least as important.
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  43. Altmann Christian, Uesaki Maiko, Ono Kentaro, Matsuhashi Masao, Mima Tatsuya & Fukuyama Hidenao (2015). Effects of Categorical Speech Perception During Active Discrimination of Stop-Consonants and Vowels Within the Left Superior Temporal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  44. Günter Ehret (1989). Categorical/Continuous Perception: A Phenomenon Pressed Into Different Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):763.
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  45. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1999). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? The Case for Cognitive Impenetrability of Visual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to general cognition. This paper sets out some of the arguments for both sides and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, which may be called early vision or just vision, is prohibited from accessing relevant expectations, knowledge and utilities - in other (...)
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  46.  37
    Will Davies (forthcoming). Colour Vision and Seeing Colours. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Colour vision plays a foundational explanatory role in the philosophy of colour, and serves as perennial quarry in the wider philosophy of perception. I present two contributions to our understanding of this notion. The first is to develop a constitutive approach to characterising colour vision. This approach seeks to comprehend the nature of colour vision qua psychological kind, as contrasted with traditional experiential approaches, which prioritise descriptions of our ordinary visual experience of colour. The second contribution is to argue (...)
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  47.  35
    Hermann Burchard (2011). The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception. Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to see (...)
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  48. Dominic W. Massaro (1989). Multiple Book Review of Speech Perception by Ear and Eye: A Paradigm for Psychological Inquiry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):741.
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  49. Uriah Kriegel (2015). Perception and Imagination. In S. Miguens, G. Preyer & C. Bravo Morando (eds.), Prereflective Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Routledge 245-276.
    According to a traditional view, there is no categorical difference between the phenomenology of perception and the phenomenology of imagination; the only difference is in degree (of intensity, resolution, etc.) and/or in accompanying beliefs. There is no categorical difference between what it is like to perceive a dog and what it is like to imagine a dog; the former is simply more vivid and/or is accompanied by the belief that a dog is really there. A sustained argument (...)
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  50.  94
    Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2000). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to cognition. This target article sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, psychophysics, perceptual learning, and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, corresponding to what some people have called (...)
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