Search results for 'Categorical perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color: Assessing the Role of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):439-462.score: 180.0
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make (...)
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  2. Luis Emilio Bruni (2008). Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes. Biosemiotics 1 (1):113-130.score: 180.0
    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception–cognition–action and it has not been considered the possibility to extend this kind of phenomena to the mere physiological level. To generalise the notion of CP in this sense, I have proposed to distinguish between categorical perception (...)
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  3. Kazuo Okanoya Yoshi-Taka Matsuda, Tomomi Fujimura, Kentaro Katahira, Masato Okada, Kenichi Ueno, Kang Cheng (2013). The Implicit Processing of Categorical and Dimensional Strategies: An fMRI Study of Facial Emotion Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 156.0
    Our understanding of facial emotion perception has been dominated by two seemingly opposing theories: the categorical and dimensional theories. However, we have recently demonstrated that hybrid processing involving both categorical and dimensional perception can be induced in an implicit manner (Fujimura et al., 2012). The underlying neural mechanisms of this hybrid processing remain unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that separate neural loci might intrinsically encode categorical and dimensional processing functions that serve as (...)
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  4. James Kopp & James Livermore (1973). Differential Discriminability of Response Bias? A Signal Detection Analysis for Categorical Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):179.score: 150.0
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  5. William Bechtel (1988). Studies of Categorization: A Review Essay of Neisser's 'Concepts and Conceptual Development' and Hamad's 'Categorical Perception'. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):381-389.score: 120.0
    Concepts and Conceptual Development: Ecological and Intellectual Factors in Categorization ULRIC NEISSER, 1987 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press x+384 pp., $39.50 Categorical Perception STEVAN HARNAD, 1987 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press x+599 pp., $59.50.
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  6. Stevan Harnad & SJ Hanson, Categorical Perception and the Evolution of Supervised Learning in Neural Nets.score: 120.0
    Some of the features of animal and human categorical perception (CP) for color, pitch and speech are exhibited by neural net simulations of CP with one-dimensional inputs: When a backprop net is trained to discriminate and then categorize a set of stimuli, the second task is accomplished by "warping" the similarity space (compressing within-category distances and expanding between-category distances). This natural side-effect also occurs in humans and animals. Such CP categories, consisting of named, bounded regions of similarity space, (...)
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  7. Stevan Harnad & Stephen J. Hanson, Learned Categorical Perception in Neural Nets: Implications for Symbol Grounding.score: 120.0
    After people learn to sort objects into categories they see them differently. Members of the same category look more alike and members of different categories look more different. This phenomenon of within-category compression and between-category separation in similarity space is called categorical perception (CP). It is exhibited by human subjects, animals and neural net models. In backpropagation nets trained first to auto-associate 12 stimuli varying along a onedimensional continuum and then to sort them into 3 categories, CP arises (...)
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  8. Jennifer M. B. Fugate (2013). Categorical Perception for Emotional Faces. Emotion Review 5 (1):84-89.score: 120.0
    Categorical perception (CP) refers to how similar things look different depending on whether they are classified as the same category. Many studies demonstrate that adult humans show CP for human emotional faces. It is widely debated whether the effect can be accounted for solely by perceptual differences (structural differences among emotional faces) or whether additional perceiver-based conceptual knowledge is required. In this review, I discuss the phenomenon of CP and key studies showing CP for emotional faces. I then (...)
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  9. Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):439-462.score: 120.0
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make (...)
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  10. Stevan Harnad, Psychophysical and Cognitive Aspects of Categorical Perception:A Critical Overview.score: 90.0
    There are many entry points into the problem of categorization. Two particularly important ones are the so-called top-down and bottom-up approaches. Top-down approaches such as artificial intelligence begin with the symbolic names and descriptions for some categories already given; computer programs are written to manipulate the symbols. Cognitive modeling involves the further assumption that such symbol-interactions resemble the way our brains do categorization. An explicit expectation of the top-down approach is that it will eventually join with the bottom-up approach, which (...)
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  11. Stevan Harnad (2003). Categorical Perception. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group. 67--4.score: 90.0
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  12. Stephen Andrew Butterfill, Categorical Perception : Not What It Seems.score: 90.0
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  13. Anna Franklin (2009). Pre-Linguistic Categorical Perception of Colour Cannot Be Explained by Colour Preference: Response to Roberson and Hanley. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (12):501-502.score: 90.0
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  14. Marcus Cheetham, Pascal Suter & Lutz Jäncke (2011). The Human Likeness Dimension of the “Uncanny Valley Hypothesis”: Behavioral and Functional MRI Findings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:126.score: 90.0
    The uncanny valley hypothesis (Mori, 1970) predicts differential experience of negative and positive affect as a function of human likeness. Affective experience of realistic humanlike robots and computer-generated characters (avatars) dominates “uncanny” research, but findings are inconsistent. How objects are actually perceived along the hypothesis’ dimension of human likeness (DOH), defined only in terms of human physical similarity, is unknown. To examine whether the DOH can be defined also in terms of effects of categorical perception (CP), stimuli from (...)
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  15. Beatrice de Gelder, Jan-Pieter Teunisse & Philip J. Benson (1997). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions: Categories and Their Internal Structure. Cognition and Emotion 11 (1):1-23.score: 90.0
  16. Andrew T. Hendrickson, George Kachergis, Todd M. Gureckis & Robert L. Goldstone (2010). Is Categorical Perception Really Verbally Mediated Perception? In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.score: 90.0
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  17. Frances Le Cornu Knight, Matthew R. Longo & Andrew J. Bremner (2014). Categorical Perception of Tactile Distance. Cognition 131 (2):254-262.score: 90.0
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  18. Daniel Joseph Navarro, Michael David Lee & H. C. Nikkerud (forthcoming). Learned Categorical Perception for Natural Faces. Cognitive Science.score: 90.0
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  19. Fiona N. Newell & Heinrich H. Bülthoff (2002). Categorical Perception of Familiar Objects. Cognition 85 (2):113-143.score: 90.0
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  20. Leslie A. Notman, Paul T. Sowden & Emre Özgen (2005). The Nature of Learned Categorical Perception Effects: A Psychophysical Approach. Cognition 95 (2):B1-B14.score: 90.0
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  21. Craig T. Palmer, B. Eric Fredrickson & Christopher F. Tilley (1996). Group Selection or Categorical Perception? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):780.score: 90.0
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  22. Debi Roberson, Hyensou Pak & J. Richard Hanley (2008). Categorical Perception of Colour in the Left and Right Visual Field is Verbally Mediated: Evidence From Korean. Cognition 107 (2):752-762.score: 90.0
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  23. Willy Serniclaes, Paulo Ventura, José Morais & Régine Kolinsky (2005). Categorical Perception of Speech Sounds in Illiterate Adults. Cognition 98 (2):B35-B44.score: 90.0
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  24. David Bimler & John Kirkland (2001). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions of Emotion: Evidence From Multidimensional Scaling. Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):633-658.score: 90.0
  25. Robert G. Crowder (1989). Categorical Perception of Speech: A Largely Dead Horse, Surpassingly Well Kicked. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):760.score: 90.0
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  26. Nancy L. Etcoff & John J. Magee (1992). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions. Cognition 44 (3):227-240.score: 90.0
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  27. Robert L. Goldstone, Mark Steyvers & Kenneth Larimer (1996). Categorical Perception of Novel Dimensions. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 243--248.score: 90.0
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  28. Stephen McCullough & Karen Emmorey (2009). Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions. Cognition 110 (2):208-221.score: 90.0
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  29. Belin P. (2008). Categorical Perception of Voice Identity? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  30. Roger K. R. Thompson & David L. Oden (2000). Categorical Perception and Conceptual Judgments by Nonhuman Primates: The Paleological Monkey and the Analogical Ape. Cognitive Science 24 (3):363-396.score: 90.0
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  31. Michel Treisman (1999). There Are Two Types of Psychometric Function: A Theory of Cue Combination in the Processing of Complex Stimuli with Implications for Categorical Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 128 (4):517.score: 90.0
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  32. Nicolas Vermeulen, Olivier Luminet, Mariana Cordovil de Sousa & Salvatore Campanella (2008). Categorical Perception of Anger is Disrupted in Alexithymia: Evidence From a Visual ERP Study. Cognition and Emotion 22 (6):1052-1067.score: 90.0
  33. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1999). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? The Case for Cognitive Impenetrability of Visual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 84.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to general cognition. This paper sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, Psychophysics, perceptual learning and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, which may be called early vision or (...)
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  34. Pascal Belin Cyril R. Pernet (2012). The Role of Pitch and Timbre in Voice Gender Categorization. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 84.0
    Voice gender perception can be thought of as a mixture of low-level perceptual feature extraction and higher-level cognitive processes. Although it seems apparent that voice gender perception would rely on low-level pitch analysis, many lines of research suggest that this is not the case. Indeed, voice gender perception has been shown to rely on timbre perception and to be categorical, i.e. to depend on accessing a gender model or representation. Here, we used a unique combination (...)
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  35. Roland Thomaschke (2012). Investigating Ideomotor Cognition with Motorvisual Priming Paradigms: Key Findings, Methodological Challenges, and Future Directions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 84.0
    Ideomotor theory claims that perceptual representations of action effects are functionally involved in the planning of actions. Strong evidence for this claim comes from a phenomenon called motorvisual priming. Motorvisual priming refers to the finding that action planning directly affects perception, and that the effects are selective for stimuli that share features with the planned action. Motorvisual priming studies have provided detailed insights into the processing of perceptual representations in action planning. One important finding is that such representations in (...)
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  36. Mohan Matthen (2005). Is Color Perception Really Categorical? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):504-505.score: 72.0
    Are color categories the evolutionary product of their usefulness in communication, or is this an accidental benefit they give us? It is argued here that embodiment constraints on color categorization suggest that communication is an add-on at best. Thus, the Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) model may be important in explaining coordination, but only at the margin. Furthermore, the concentration on discrimination is questionable: coclassification is at least as important.
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  37. James M. Beale & Frank C. Keil (1995). Categorical Effects in the Perception of Faces. Cognition 57 (3):217-239.score: 72.0
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  38. Gaetano Justin, Brooks Anna & Van Der Zwan Rick (2013). Biases of Categorical Sex Perception: What Are They and How Do We Gauge Them? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 72.0
  39. Günter Ehret (1989). Categorical/Continuous Perception: A Phenomenon Pressed Into Different Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):763.score: 72.0
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  40. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2000). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 66.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to cognition. This target article sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, psychophysics, perceptual learning, and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, corresponding to what some people have called (...)
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  41. Hermann Burchard (2011). The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception. Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.score: 66.0
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to see (...)
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  42. Dominic W. Massaro (1989). Multiple Book Review of Speech Perception by Ear and Eye: A Paradigm for Psychological Inquiry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):741.score: 66.0
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  43. Jacques Dubucs (2002). Calculer, percevoir et classer. Archives de Philosophie 2:335-355.score: 60.0
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  44. Cyril R. Pernet, Pascal Belin & Anna Jones (2014). Behavioral Evidence of a Dissociation Between Voice Gender Categorization and Phoneme Categorization Using Auditory Morphed Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 60.0
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  45. Léo Varnet, Kenneth Knoblauch, Fanny Meunier & Michel Hoen (2013). Using Auditory Classification Images for the Identification of Fine Acoustic Cues Used in Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:865.score: 60.0
    An essential step in understanding the processes underlying the general mechanism of perceptual categorization is to identify which portions of a physical stimulation modulate the behavior of our perceptual system. More specifically, in the context of speech comprehension, it is still a major open challenge to understand which information is used to categorize a speech stimulus as one phoneme or another, the auditory primitives relevant for the categorical perception of speech being still unknown. Here we propose to adapt (...)
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  46. Kai Vogeley Bojana Kuzmanovic, Anneli Jefferson, Gary Bente (2013). Affective and Motivational Influences in Person Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 54.0
    Interpersonal impression formation is highly consequential for social interactions in private and public domains. These perceptions of others rely on different sources of information and processing mechanisms, all of which have been investigated in independent research fields. In social psychology, inferences about states and traits of others as well as activations of semantic categories and corresponding stereotypes have attracted great interest. On the other hand, research on emotion and reward demonstrated affective and motivational influences of social cues on the observer, (...)
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  47. John Campbell (2005). Transparency Vs. Revelation in Color Perception. Philosophical Topics 33 (1):105-115.score: 42.0
    What knowledge of the colors does perception of the colors provide? My first aim in this essay is to characterize the way in which color experience seems to provide knowledge of colors. This in turn tells us something about what it takes for there to be colors. Color experience provides knowledge of the aspect of the world that is being acted on when we, or some external force, act on the color of an object and thus make a difference (...)
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  48. Ken Safir (1993). Perception, Selection, and Structural Economy. Natural Language Semantics 2 (1):47-70.score: 42.0
    In this essay I will explore the syntactic expression of the notion ‘clause’ by focusing on some syntactic and semantic properties of bare infinitive (BI) complements to perception verbs in English. I shall argue briefly that perception BI complements must be clausal, and then turn in more detail to the issue of what sort of clause the BI complement must be. It will be established that the categorical nature of the perception BI complement as IP or (...)
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  49. Giorgio Ganis Haline E. Schendan (2012). Electrophysiological Potentials Reveal Cortical Mechanisms for Mental Imagery, Mental Simulation, and Grounded (Embodied) Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 42.0
    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery of a picture. Mental imagery of the identical face or object (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual knowledge (...)
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