Search results for 'Categories (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. Panella (1984). 'Reflections on the Revolution in France', Categories of Political-Action, and the Philosophy of History in Burke, Edmund. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 4 (2):200-216.
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  2.  8
    D. S. Patelis (2008). Social Philosophy and the Logic of History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:571-577.
    Different conceptions of social philosophy were divided and polarized in different variants: from biological reductionism (the attempt to explain social phenomena in terms of biology) to sociocentrism. The approach V. A. Vazulin’s conception of “The Logic of History” makes it possible to concretize the dialectic of the natural (including the biological) and the social. The creative development of the method of scientific investigation made it possible to reveal the inner systematic interconnection of laws and categories of social theory (...)
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  3.  9
    D. S. Patelis (2008). Social Philosophy and the Logic of History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:571-577.
    Different conceptions of social philosophy were divided and polarized in different variants: from biological reductionism (the attempt to explain social phenomena in terms of biology) to sociocentrism. The approach V. A. Vazulin’s conception of “The Logic of History” makes it possible to concretize the dialectic of the natural (including the biological) and the social. The creative development of the method of scientific investigation made it possible to reveal the inner systematic interconnection of laws and categories of social theory (...)
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  4.  17
    Luke O’Sullivan (2008). Categories of Historical Thought. Philosophia 36 (4):429-452.
    This paper argues that the identity of history as a discipline derives from its distinctive combination of intellectual assumptions, or categories. Many of these categories are shared with other fields of thought, including science, literature, and common sense, but in history are understood in a unique way. This paper first examines the general notion of categories of historical understanding, then scrutinises some of the specific categories suggested by classic authors on the philosophy of (...) such as Dilthey and Collingwood. More recent works by Goldstein, Oakeshott, Bevir, and Tucker are treated as contributions to the same discussion. It concludes that the various categories these writers have proposed are neither trivial nor incompatible and that when collated they do indeed compose a framework capable of characterising historical thought. (shrink)
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  5. Keqian Xu (2006). 論儒家哲學之“道”的實踐屬性與歷史屬性On the Practice and History Attributes of the “Dao” in the Confucian Philosophy. 學術論壇 Academic Forum, 2006 (11):32-34.
    The important feature of Dao as a philosophic category in early Confucian philosophy is its prominent practical and historical properties, which make it different from those western metaphysic categories. Confucianism emphasizes that the Dao can not be separated with the practice and the history of human being, thus the Tao should be explored in peoples’ social activities and history. They believe that the Tao only lives in the historical tradition and can only be demonstrated by the narrative (...)
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  6.  11
    Peter Galison (2008). Ten Problems in History and Philosophy of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:111-124.
    In surveying the field of history and philosophy of science , it may be more useful just now to pose some key questions than it would be to lay out the sundry competing attempts to unify H and P. The ten problems this essay presents are grounded in a range of work of enormous interest—historical and philosophical work that has made use of productive categories of analysis: context, historicism, purity, and microhistory, to name but a few. What kind (...)
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  7.  6
    Fang Keli (1986). On the Categories of Substance and Function in Chinese Philosophy. Contemporary Chinese Thought 17 (3):26-77.
    Editorial note [from the editors of Zhongguo shehui kexue]: This essay takes the position that the categories ti and yong are a pair of categories that suffice to express the characteristics of the mode of theoretical reasoning and thought of the Chinese people. It posits that these categories, or rather, this category [in the sense that the two are symbiotic and intertwined] is a product of the development of Chinese philosophy itself. The fundamental connotations of this category (...)
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  8. Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen M. Higgins (1999). A Passion for Wisdom: A Very Brief History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Readers eager to acquire a basic familiarity with the history of philosophy but intimidated by the task will find in A Passion for Wisdom a lively, accessible, and highly enjoyable tour of the world's great ideas. Here, Robert Solomon and Kathleen Higgins tell the story of philosophy's development with great clarity and refreshing wit. The authors begin with the most ancient religious beliefs of the east and west and bring us right up to the feminist and multicultural philosophies of (...)
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  9. Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen M. Higgins (1997). Passion for Wisdom: A Very Brief History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    When the ancient Greek philosopher, Pythagoras, was asked if he was a wise man, he humbly replied "No, I am only a lover of wisdom." This love of wisdom has been central to the philosophical enterprise for thousands of years, inspiring some of the most dazzling and daring achievements of the human intellect and providing the very basis for how we understand the world. Now, readers eager to acquire a basic familiarity with the history of philosophy but intimidated by (...)
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  10. Martin Kavka, Zachary Braiterman & David Novak (eds.) (2012). The Cambridge History of Jewish Philosophy: The Modern Era. Cambridge University Press.
    The second volume of The Cambridge History of Jewish Philosophy provides a comprehensive overview of Jewish philosophy from the seventeenth century to the present day. Written by a distinguished group of experts in the field, its essays examine how Jewish thinking was modified in its encounter with modern Europe and America and challenge longstanding assumptions about the nature and purpose of modern Jewish philosophy. The volume also treats modern Jewish philosophy's continuities with premodern texts and thinkers, the relationship between (...)
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  11.  18
    John Marenbon (1981). From the Circle of Alcuin to the School of Auxerre: Logic, Theology, and Philosophy in the Early Middle Ages. New Yorkcambridge University Press.
    This study is the first modern account of the development of philosophy during the Carolingian Renaissance. In the late eighth century, Dr Marenbon argues, theologians were led by their enthusiasm for logic to pose themselves truly philosophical questions. The central themes of ninth-century philosophy - essence, the Aristotelian Categories, the problem of Universals - were to preoccupy thinkers throughout the Middle Ages. The earliest period of medieval philosophy was thus a formative one. This work is based on a fresh (...)
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  12.  18
    Roger Smith (2005). The History of Psychological Categories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):55-94.
    Psychological terms, such as ‘mind’, ‘memory’, ‘emotion’ and indeed ‘psychology’ itself, have a history. This history, I argue, supports the view that basic psychological categories refer to historical and social entities, and not to ‘natural kinds’. The case is argued through a wide ranging review of the historiography of western psychology, first, in connection with the field’s extreme modern diversity; second, in relation to the possible antecedents of the field in the early modern period; and lastly, through (...)
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  13.  20
    Giorgio Pini (2001). Categories and Logic in Duns Scotus: An Interpretation of Aristotle's Categories in the Late Thirteenth Century. Brill.
    This study of the interpretations of Aristotle's "Categories" in the thirteenth century provides an introduction to some main themes of medieval philosophical ...
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  14.  23
    Christos Evangeliou (ed.) (1988). Aristotle's Categories and Porphyry. E.J. Brill.
    INTRODUCTION. Porphyry the Philosopher The most distinguished disciple of Plotinus, his editor and close friend, was without doubt Porphyry. ...
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  15. Abraham Zvie Bar-on (1987). The Categories and the Principle of Coherence: Whitehead's Theory of Categories in Historical Perspective. Distributors for the Usa and Canada, Kluwer Academic.
  16. Veena Gajendragadkar (1988). Kaṇāda's Doctrine of the Padārthas, I.E. The Categories. Sri Satguru Publications.
     
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  17.  34
    Giorgio Agamben (1999). Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    This volume constitutes the largest collection of writings by the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben hitherto published in any language and all but one appear in English for the first time. The essays consider figures in the history of philosophy (Plato, Plotinus, Spinoza, Hegel) and twentieth-century thought (Walter Benjamin, Heidegger, Derrida, Deleuze, the historian Aby Warburg, and the linguist J.-C. Milner). They also examine several central concerns of Agamben: the relation of linguistic and metaphysical categories; messianism in Islamic, Jewish, (...)
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  18.  22
    Siegfried Maser (1981). Causality, Regularity, Probability. The History of Fundamental Categories in Man's Understanding of the World. Philosophy and History 14 (1):33-34.
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  19.  1
    Roger Smith (2005). The History of Psychological Categories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (1):55-94.
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    Malcolm Schofield (ed.) (2013). Aristotle, Plato and Pythagoreanism in the First Century Bc: New Directions for Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents an up-to-date overview of the main new directions taken by ancient philosophy in the first century BC, a period in which the dominance exercised in the Hellenistic age by Stoicism, Epicureanism and Academic Scepticism gave way to a more diverse and experimental philosophical scene. Its development has been much less well understood, but here a strong international team of leading scholars of the subject reconstruct key features of the changed environment. They examine afresh the evidence for some (...)
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  21. Robert C. Williams (2010). Confusing History. History and Theory 49 (2):304-309.
    This compendium of fifty essays by international philosophers examines history from the point of view of its cognate disciplines, historiography and the philosophy of history. The authors often use the terms history, the past, and historiography interchangeably. Essays are grouped in four broad categories: basic problems, major fields, philosophy and sub-fields of historiography, and classical schools and philosophers of history. The book provides useful insights, some dated by the fashion of postmodernism. The essays are largely (...)
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  22.  9
    Timothy Fitzgerald (2007). Discourse on Civility and Barbarity: A Critical History of Religion and Related Categories. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years scholars have begun to question the usefulness of the category of ''religion'' to describe a distinctive form of human experience and behavior. In his last book, The Ideology of Religious Studies (OUP 2000), Timothy Fitzgerald argued that ''religion'' was not a private area of human existence that could be separated from the public realm and that the study of religion as such was thus impossibility. In this new book he examines a wide range of English-language texts to (...)
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  23.  32
    Colin Koopman (2010). Historicism in Pragmatism: Lessons in Historiography and Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 41 (5):690-713.
    Abstract: Pragmatism involves simultaneous commitments to modes of inquiry that are philosophical and historical. This article begins by demonstrating this point as it is evidenced in the historicist pragmatisms of William James and John Dewey. Having shown that pragmatism focuses philosophical attention on concrete historical processes, the article turns to a discussion of the specific historiographical commitments consistent with this focus. This focus here is on a pragmatist version of historical inquiry in terms of the central historiographical categories of (...)
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  24.  12
    Gerard Clinton Godart (2007). "Philosophy" or "Religion"? The Confrontation with Foreign Categories in Late Nineteenth-Century Japan. Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):71-91.
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  25.  8
    A. A. Goldenweiser (1918). History, Psychology and Culture: A Set of Categories for an Introduction to Social Science. Part I. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (21):561-571.
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  26.  2
    A. A. Goldenweiser (1918). History, Psychology and Culture: A Set of Categories for an Introduction to Social Science. Part II. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (22):589-607.
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  27.  22
    Veronica Alfano & Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Still Lives: The History and Philosophy of Mourning Texts. Routledge.
    “Call no one happy until they are dead.” “Never speak ill of the dead.” If we still heed the injunctions of Solon and Chilon of Sparta, then obituaries, which represent a prominent way of expressing the human universal of grief, are a resource for philosophical anthropology. Philosophers have emphasized that we can determine what counts as a virtue for a given type of person in a given cultural context by analyzing what people say about the dead (Zagzebski 1996, p. 135). (...)
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  28. Hilary Putnam (1981). Reason, Truth, and History. Cambridge University Press.
    Hilary Putnam deals in this book with some of the most fundamental persistent problems in philosophy: the nature of truth, knowledge and rationality. His aim is to break down the fixed categories of thought which have always appeared to define and constrain the permissible solutions to these problems.
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  29.  2
    Thomas H. Ford (2015). The Natural History of Aesthetics. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):220-239.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 220 - 239 Art has been crucial for Western philosophy roughly since Kant – that is, for what is becoming known as “correlationist” philosophy – because it has so often had assigned to it a singular ontological status. The artwork, in this view, is material being that has been transfigured and shot through with subjectivity. The work of art, what art does and how it works have all been understood as mediating between the (...)
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  30. Rainer Carls (1974). Idee Und Menge: Der Aufbau E. Kategorialen Ontologie Als Folge Aud D. Paradozien D Bergriffsrealismus in D Griech. Berchmannskolleg-Verlag.
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  31.  71
    Anthony Kenny (2008). From Empedocles to Wittgenstein: Historical Essays in Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.
    Concepts of creation -- Life after Etna : Empedocles in prose and poetry -- Virtue and the good in Plato and Aristotle -- Aristotle's criteria for happiness -- Practical truth in Aristotle -- Aristotle's categories in the Latin fathers -- Essence and existence : Aquinas and Islamic philosophy -- Aquinas on the beginning of individual human life -- Thomas and thomism -- Aquinas in America -- Philosophy states only what everyone admits -- Cognitive scientism -- The Wittgenstein editions -- (...)
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  32.  5
    Maddalena Mazzocut-Mis (2012). Fare per osservare. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 5.
    A reflection about the risks and the challenges that involve the aesthetics as discipline. A discipline that has a history, a specific object and that shares with philosophy the prerogative of its uselessness. A discipline that needs a new formulation (not a new foundation): a discipline that “gets his hands dirty”, that tackles the world, the perception, the emotions and the most controversial aesthetic categories.
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  33.  28
    Phillip R. Sloan (2002). Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):229-253.
    Phillip R. Sloan - Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 229-253 Preforming the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori Phillip R. Sloan Situating Kant's philosophical project in relation to the natural sciences of his day has been of concern to several scholars from both the history of (...)
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  34.  89
    John Corcoran (ed.) (1974). Ancient Logic and its Modern Interpretations. Boston,Reidel.
    This book treats ancient logic: the logic that originated in Greece by Aristotle and the Stoics, mainly in the hundred year period beginning about 350 BCE. Ancient logic was never completely ignored by modern logic from its Boolean origin in the middle 1800s: it was prominent in Boole’s writings and it was mentioned by Frege and by Hilbert. Nevertheless, the first century of mathematical logic did not take it seriously enough to study the ancient logic texts. A renaissance in ancient (...)
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  35.  26
    Feng Cao (2008). A Return to Intellectual History: A New Approach to Pre-Qin Discourse on Name. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (2):213-228.
    Discussions of name during the pre-Qin and Qin-Han period of Chinese history were very active. The concept ming at that time can be divided into two categories, one is the ethical-political meaning of the term and the other is the linguistic-logical understanding. The former far exceeds the latter in terms of overall influence on the development of Chinese intellectual history. But it is the latter that has received the most attention in the 20th century, due to the (...)
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  36.  5
    María J. Binetti (2007). Kierkegaard's Ethical Stage In Hegel's Logical Categories: Actual Possibility, Reality And Necessity. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 3 (2-3):357-369.
    During decades, the history of philosophy has kept Kierkegaardrsquo;s and Hegelrsquo;s thought apart, and their long-standing opposition has swept through the speculative greatness of Kierkegaardian existentialism and the existential power of Hegelian philosophy. In contrast to such unfortunate misinterpretation, this article aims at showing the deep convergence that relates interiorly the Kierkegaardian ethical stage with the most important Hegelian logic categories. Kierkegaard and Hegel conceive of the idea as the real power of subjective becoming, and the existence as (...)
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  37.  11
    Matthew Simpson (2005). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Rousseau and The Social Contract (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):364-364.
    Matthew Simpson - Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Rousseau and The Social Contract - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 43.3 364 Christopher Bertram. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Rousseau and The Social Contract. London: Routledge, 2004. Pp. ix + 214. Paper, $15.95. The main problem with the interpretation of Rousseau's political thought today is that his theories rarely fit into the categories that define contemporary philosophy. He was neither a liberal nor (...)
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  38.  52
    Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.) (2010). A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This monumental collection of new and recent essays from an international team of eminent scholars represents the best contemporary critical thinking relating to both literary and philosophical studies of literature. Helpfully groups essays into the field's main sub-categories, among them ‘Relations Between Philosophy and Literature’, ‘Emotional Engagement and the Experience of Reading’, ‘Literature and the Moral Life’, and ‘Literary Language’ Offers a combination of analytical precision and literary richness Represents an unparalleled work of reference for students and specialists alike, (...)
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  39. G. E. Berrios (1996). The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology Since the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Since psychiatry remains a descriptive discipline, it is essential for its practitioners to understand how the language of psychiatry came to be formed. This important book, written by a psychiatrist-historian, traces the genesis of the descriptive categories of psychopathology and examines their interaction with the psychological and philosophical context within which they arose. The author explores particularly the language and ideas that have characterised descriptive psychopathology from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. He presents a masterful survey of (...)
     
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  40.  7
    Frederick Rosen (2006). The Philosophy of Error and Liberty of Thought: J.S. Mill on Logical Fallacies. Informal Logic 26 (2):121-147.
    Most recent discussions of John Stuart Mill’s System of Logic (1843) neglect the fifth book concerned with logical fallacies. Mill not only follows the revival of interest in the traditional Aristotelian doctrine of fallacies in Richard Whately and Augustus De Morgan, but he also develops new categories and an original analysis which enhance the study of fallacies within the context of what he calls ‘the philosophy of error’. After an exploration of this approach, the essay relates the philosophy of (...)
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  41.  28
    Ioannis Trisokkas (2014). Anachronism, Antiquarianism, and Konstellationsforschung: A Critique of Beiser. Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 44 (1):87-113.
    In his Introduction to The Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (2008), entitled ‘The Puzzling Hegel Renaissance’, Frederick Beiser, the editor of the volume, claims that Anglophone Hegel research has been in the main deeply problematic and proceeds to offer a program of research for its rejuvenation. The paper argues that the reasons based on which he exercises his critique (antiquarianism and anachronism) fail on internal grounds and that, therefore, Hegelforschung should not be reduced to his proposed research program (...)
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  42. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between medical (...)
     
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  43.  25
    Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen (2013). Kuhn's Legacy: Theoretical and Philosophical Study of History. [REVIEW] Topoi 32 (1):91-99.
    This paper considers the legacy of Kuhn and his Structure with regard to the current history and philosophy of science. Kuhn can be seen as a myth breaker, whose contribution is the way he connected historical and philosophical studies of science, questioning the cumulativist image and demanding historical responsibility of the views of science. I build on Kuhn’s legacy and outline a suggestion for theoretical and philosophical study of history (of science), which can be subdivided into three (...). The first is the philosophical analysis of historical interpretation and its relation to the historical record. The second is ‘theoretical history’ in which one tries to infer philosophically relevant interpretations on the nature of science on the basis of historical evidence. The third is the conceptual reflection of the assumptions and implications of the contemporary historiography of science. At the end I suggest that theoretical and philosophical study of history offers a fresh way to make history and philosophy relevant to each other. (shrink)
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  44.  8
    Mohammed Girma (2014). Negotiating Indigenous Metaphysics as Educational Philosophy in Ethiopia. Sophia 53 (1):81-97.
    In Ethiopia, the history of the use of modern philosophical categories in education is short. This is because the country’s modern education itself is barely 100 years old. What is not so short, however, is the history of the use of indigenous metaphysics in temehert (traditional education), which goes back as far as the introduction of Christianity to Ethiopia—to the fourth century A.D. Since its inception, education has had a close, if ambivalent, relationship with different philosophical tenets, (...)
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  45.  40
    Maureen A. O’Malley & John Dupré (2007). Size Doesn't Matter: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 22 (2):155-191.
    Philosophers of biology, along with everyone else, generally perceive life to fall into two broad categories, the microbes and macrobes, and then pay most of their attention to the latter. ‘Macrobe’ is the word we propose for larger life forms, and we use it as part of an argument for microbial equality. We suggest that taking more notice of microbes – the dominant life form on the planet, both now and throughout evolutionary history – will transform some of (...)
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  46.  71
    Lee Braver (2012). A Brief History of Continental Realism. Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):261-289.
    This paper explains the nature and origin of what I am calling Transgressive Realism, a middle path between realism and anti-realism which tries to combine their strengths while avoiding their weaknesses. Kierkegaard created the position by merging Hegel’s insistence that we must have some kind of contact with anything we can call real (thus rejecting noumena), with Kant’s belief that reality fundamentally exceeds our understanding; human reason should not be the criterion of the real. The result is the idea that (...)
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  47.  14
    Michael Newall (2014). Painting and Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (4):225-237.
    This article is primarily concerned with the philosophical problems that arise out of a consideration of painting. By painting I mean of course not any kind of application of paint to a surface – house painting for instance – but painting as an art, to use Richard Wollheim's phrase. Since Plato, philosophy has intermittently been concerned with these problems, and over the past 30 years, painting has come under a new focus as philosophy of art has increasingly turned its attention (...)
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  48.  6
    Leah Kalmanson (2015). If You Show Me Yours: Reading All “Difference” as “Colonial Difference” in Comparative Philosophy. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):201-213.
    Postcolonial studies and decolonial theory make visible the nature and extent of Eurocentrism through a critique of constructed categories as basic as “history” and “culture.” Walter Mignolo asserts a strong claim that the concept of “culture” is itself a colonial construction, and hence all cultural difference bears the mark of coloniality. This thesis presents a challenge to the field of comparative philosophy: What does “cross-cultural” philosophy even mean if all so-called cultural difference is indeed colonial difference? Could comparativists, (...)
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  49.  16
    Steven T. Ostovich (1994). Messianic History in Benjamin and Metz. Philosophy and Theology 8 (4):271-289.
    History is not the record of humanity’s progress through otherwise empty time. It is rather to be conceived messianically, i.e., in terms of God’s eschatological promises and the interruptive capacity of dangerous memories of human suffering. This insight is contained in both the historical philosophy of Walter Benjamin and the political theology of Johann Baptist Metz. Metz’s theological categories also contribute an understanding of messianic history that avoids the dualism of Benjamin’s description of history in both (...)
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  50.  35
    Purusottama Bilimoria (2003). What is the "Subaltern" of the Comparative Philosophy of Religion? Philosophy East and West 53 (3):340-366.
    : It is claimed that Comparative Philosophy of Religion (CPR) mistakenly builds on the dogmas of comparative religion (or history of religions) and philosophy of religion. Thus, the belief that there are things common and therefore comparable between two or more traditions and that these objects of comparison are of philosophical or theological significance are questions that continue to trouble the field. Just what does one compare, how does one choose what to compare or why, through what methodological and (...)
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