Search results for 'Category Errors' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Walter J. Freeman (1997). Three Centuries of Category Errors in Studies of the Neural Basis of Consciousness and Intentionality. Neural Networks 10:1175-83.score: 150.0
  2. Alfred I. Tauber (1999). The Elusive Immune Self: A Case of Category Errors. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (4):459-474.score: 150.0
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  3. Phebe Cramer & Morris Eagle (1972). Relationship Between Conditions of CRS Presentation and the Category of False Recognition Errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (1):1.score: 124.0
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  4. Mark R. Blair, Marcus R. Watson & Kimberly M. Meier (2009). Errors, Efficiency, and the Interplay Between Attention and Category Learning. Cognition 112 (2):330-336.score: 120.0
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  5. G. Patarroyo (2009). Libertarismo & error categorial. Ideas Y Valores 58 (141):141-168.score: 64.0
    En este artículo se ofrece una defensa del libertarismo frente a dos acusaciones según las cuales éste comete un error categorial. Para ello, se utiliza la filosofía de Gilbert Ryle como herramienta para explicar las razones que fundamentan estas acusaciones y para mostrar por qué, pese a que cierta..
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  6. Manuel de Pinedo-Garcia & Jason Noble (2008). Beyond Persons: Extending the Personal/Subpersonal Distinction to Non-Rational Animals and Artificial Agents. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):87-100.score: 60.0
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  7. Donald Perlis (1983). Whose Category Error? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):606.score: 60.0
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  8. E. Rae Harcum & Edwin W. Coppage (1969). Explanation of Serial Learning Errors Within Deese-Kresse Categories. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):489.score: 58.0
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  9. Lawrence Karlin (1951). The Influence of Equality Judgments on the Constant Error. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (5):300.score: 58.0
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  10. Tobin Nellhaus (2013). The Necessity of Errors. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):129 - 135.score: 54.0
    The Necessity of Errors Content Type Journal Article Category Review Pages 129-135 Authors Tobin Nellhaus Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 12 Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 1 / 2013.
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  11. Steve Awodey (2010). Category Theory. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    Category theory is a branch of abstract algebra with incredibly diverse applications. This text and reference book is aimed not only at mathematicians, but also researchers and students of computer science, logic, linguistics, cognitive science, philosophy, and any of the other fields in which the ideas are being applied. Containing clear definitions of the essential concepts, illuminated with numerous accessible examples, and providing full proofs of all important propositions and theorems, this book aims to make the basic ideas, theorems, (...)
     
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  12. Aliza J. Schwartz, Aysecan Boduroglu & Angela H. Gutchess (2014). Cross‐Cultural Differences in Categorical Memory Errors. Cognitive Science 38 (5):997-1007.score: 50.0
    Cultural differences occur in the use of categories to aid accurate recall of information. This study investigated whether culture also contributed to false (erroneous) memories, and extended cross-cultural memory research to Turkish culture, which is shaped by Eastern and Western influences. Americans and Turks viewed word pairs, half of which were categorically related and half unrelated. Participants then attempted to recall the second word from the pair in response to the first word cue. Responses were coded as correct, as blanks, (...)
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  13. Lr Brooks & Gr Norman (1987). A Case of Independence Between Category Structure and Improvable Error in Medical Expertise. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):348-348.score: 40.0
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  14. D. Lohmar (1990). Where Was the Error of Categorial Representation-on the Meaning and Impact of Husserl Self-Critique. Husserl Studies 7 (3):179-197.score: 40.0
     
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  15. Carlos G. Patarroyo G. (2009). Libertarismo y error categorial. Ideas Y Valores 58 (141):141-168.score: 40.0
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  16. Douglas Walton & Thomas F. Gordon (2009). Jumping to a Conclusion: Fallacies and Standards of Proof. Informal Logic 29 (2):215-243.score: 36.0
    Five errors that fit under the category of jumping to a conclusion are identified: (1) arguing from premises that are insufficient as evidence to prove a conclusion (2) fallacious argument from ignorance, (3) arguing to a wrong conclusion, (4) using defeasible reasoning without being open to exceptions, and (5) overlooking/suppressing evidence. It is shown that jumping to a conclusion is best seen not as a fallacy itself, but as a more general category of faulty argumentation pattern underlying (...)
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  17. Nicolai Hartmann & Keith R. Peterson (2012). How Is Critical Ontology Possible? Toward the Foundation of the General Theory of the Categories, Part One (1923). Axiomathes 22 (3):315-354.score: 34.0
    This is a translation of an early essay by the German philosopher Nicolai Hartmann (1882–1950). In this 1923 essay Hartmann presents many of the fundamental ideas of his new critical ontology. He summarizes some of the main points of his critique of neo-Kantian epistemology, and provides the point of departure for his new approach in an extensive criticism of the errors of the classical ontological tradition. Some of these errors concern the definition of an ontological category or (...)
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  18. Hans Muller & Bana Bashour (2011). Why Alief is Not a Legitimate Psychological Category. Journal of Philosophical Research 36:371-389.score: 30.0
    We defend the view that belief is a psychological category against a recent attempt to recast it as a normative one. Tamar Gendler has argued that to properly understand how beliefs function in the regulation and production of action, we need to contrast beliefs with a class of psychological states and processes she calls “aliefs.” We agree with Gendler that affective states as well as habits and instincts deserve more attention than they receive in the contemporary philosophical psychology literature. (...)
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  19. Zsófia Zvolenszky, Abstract Artifact Theory About Fictional Characters Defended — Why Sainsbury’s Category-Mistake Objection is Mistaken. Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics Vol. 5/2013.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I explore a line of argument against one form of realism about fictional characters: abstract artifact theory (‘artifactualism’, for short), the view according to which fictional characters like Harry Potter are part of our reality, but (unlike concrete entities like the Big Ben and J. K. Rowling), they are abstract objects created by humans, akin to the institution of marriage and the game of soccer. I will defend artifactualism against an objection that Mark Sainsbury (2010) considers decisive (...)
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  20. Elliot C. Brown & Martin Brüne (2012). The Role of Prediction in Social Neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (147):147-147.score: 28.0
    Research has shown that the brain is constantly making predictions about future events. Theories of prediction in perception, action and learning suggest that the brain serves to reduce the discrepancies between expectation and actual experience, i.e. by reducing the prediction error. Forward models of action and perception propose the generation of a predictive internal representation of the expected sensory outcome, which is matched to the actual sensory feedback. Shared neural representations have been found when experiencing one’s own and observing others’ (...)
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  21. Jonathan Bain (2013). Category-Theoretic Structure and Radical Ontic Structural Realism. Synthese 190 (9):1621-1635.score: 24.0
    Radical Ontic Structural Realism (ROSR) claims that structure exists independently of objects that may instantiate it. Critics of ROSR contend that this claim is conceptually incoherent, insofar as, (i) it entails there can be relations without relata, and (ii) there is a conceptual dependence between relations and relata. In this essay I suggest that (ii) is motivated by a set-theoretic formulation of structure, and that adopting a category-theoretic formulation may provide ROSR with more support. In particular, I consider how (...)
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  22. Jan Westerhoff (2002). Defining 'Ontological Category'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (3):287–293.score: 24.0
    Although a considerable degree of precision has been introduced both into the formulation and the discussion of ontological theories by the use of formal methods there is still a remarkable indefiniteness about foundational issues. In particular it is not clear what an ontological category is and why we regard something as an ontological category. This is amazing given that the notion of ontological category is in fact the most basic of the whole of ontology: it is what (...)
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  23. Ofra Magidor (2009). Category Mistakes Are Meaningful. Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (6):553-581.score: 24.0
    Category mistakes are sentences such as ‘Colourless green ideas sleep furiously’ or ‘The theory of relativity is eating breakfast’. Such sentences are highly anomalous, and this has led a large number of linguists and philosophers to conclude that they are meaningless (call this ‘the meaninglessness view’). In this paper I argue that the meaninglessness view is incorrect and category mistakes are meaningful. I provide four arguments against the meaninglessness view: in Sect. 2, an argument concerning compositionality with respect (...)
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  24. David Theo Goldberg (1990). Racism and Rationality: The Need for a New Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (3):317-350.score: 24.0
    Two classes of argument, logical and moral, are usually offered for the general assumption that racism is inherently irrational. The logical arguments involve accusations concerning stereotyping (category mistakes and empirical errors resulting from overgeneralization) as well as inconsistencies between attitudes and behavior and inconsistencies in beliefs. Moral arguments claim that racism fails as means to well-defined ends, or that racist acts achieve ends other than moral ones. Based on a rationality-neutral definition of racism, it is argued in this (...)
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  25. Walter J. Freeman (1999). Neurogenetic Determinism is a Theological Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):893-894.score: 24.0
    In “Lifelines” Steven Rose constructs a case against neurogenetic determinism based on experimental data from biology and in favor of a significant degree of self determination. Two philosophical errors in the case favoring neurogenetic determinism are illustrated by Rose: category mistakes and an excessively narrow view of causality restricted to the linear form.
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  26. C. J. Isham (2005). Quantising on a Category. Foundations of Physics 35 (2):271-297.score: 24.0
    We review the problem of finding a general framework within which one can construct quantum theories of non-standard models for space, or space-time. The starting point is the observation that entities of this type can typically be regarded as objects in a category whose arrows are structure-preserving maps. This motivates investigating the general problem of quantising a system whose ‘configuration space’ (or history-theory analogue) is the set of objects Ob(Q) in a category Q. We develop a scheme based (...)
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  27. Michael John Healy & Thomas Preston Caudell (2006). Ontologies and Worlds in Category Theory: Implications for Neural Systems. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 16 (1-2):165-214.score: 24.0
    We propose category theory, the mathematical theory of structure, as a vehicle for defining ontologies in an unambiguous language with analytical and constructive features. Specifically, we apply categorical logic and model theory, based upon viewing an ontology as a sub-category of a category of theories expressed in a formal logic. In addition to providing mathematical rigor, this approach has several advantages. It allows the incremental analysis of ontologies by basing them in an interconnected hierarchy of theories, with (...)
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  28. Glyn W. Humphreys & Emer M. E. Forde (2001). Hierarchies, Similarity, and Interactivity in Object Recognition: “Category-Specific” Neuropsychological Deficits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):453-476.score: 24.0
    Category-specific impairments of object recognition and naming are among the most intriguing disorders in neuropsychology, affecting the retrieval of knowledge about either living or nonliving things. They can give us insight into the nature of our representations of objects: Have we evolved different neural systems for recognizing different categories of object? What kinds of knowledge are important for recognizing particular objects? How does visual similarity within a category influence object recognition and representation? What is the nature of (...)
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  29. Giuseppe Primiero (2014). A Taxonomy of Errors for Information Systems. Minds and Machines 24 (3):249-273.score: 24.0
    We provide a full characterization of computational error states for information systems. The class of errors considered is general enough to include human rational processes, logical reasoning, scientific progress and data processing in some functional programming languages. The aim is to reach a full taxonomy of error states by analysing the recovery and processing of data. We conclude by presenting machine-readable checking and resolve algorithms.
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  30. Joseph J. Williams & Tania Lombrozo (2010). The Role of Explanation in Discovery and Generalization: Evidence From Category Learning. Cognitive Science 34 (5):776-806.score: 24.0
    Research in education and cognitive development suggests that explaining plays a key role in learning and generalization: When learners provide explanations—even to themselves—they learn more effectively and generalize more readily to novel situations. This paper proposes and tests a subsumptive constraints account of this effect. Motivated by philosophical theories of explanation, this account predicts that explaining guides learners to interpret what they are learning in terms of unifying patterns or regularities, which promotes the discovery of broad generalizations. Three experiments provide (...)
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  31. Michael Maratsos (2001). How Fast Does a Child Learn a Word? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1111-1112.score: 24.0
    This discussion argues that for many word meanings, the child has to assemble a new category, using relatively slow information-sifting processes. This does not cause high semantic errors, because children probably hold off using a word until much such sifting has occurred, rather than producing the new word as soon as they have any information on it.
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  32. Jonathan R. Folstein, Isabel Gauthier & Thomas J. Palmeri (2010). Mere Exposure Alters Category Learning of Novel Objects. Frontiers in Psychology 1:40-40.score: 24.0
    We investigated how mere exposure to complex objects with correlated or uncorrelated object features affects later category learning of new objects not seen during exposure. Correlations among pre-exposed object dimensions influenced later category learning. Unlike other published studies, the collection of pre-exposed objects provided no information regarding the categories to be learned, ruling out unsupervised or incidental category learning during pre-exposure. Instead, results are interpreted with respect to statistical learning mechanisms, providing one of the first demonstrations of (...)
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  33. Arnon Avron & Beata Konikowska (2009). Proof Systems for Reasoning About Computation Errors. Studia Logica 91 (2):273 - 293.score: 24.0
    In the paper we examine the use of non-classical truth values for dealing with computation errors in program specification and validation. In that context, 3-valued McCarthy logic is suitable for handling lazy sequential computation, while 3-valued Kleene logic can be used for reasoning about parallel computation. If we want to be able to deal with both strategies without distinguishing between them, we combine Kleene and McCarthy logics into a logic based on a non-deterministic, 3-valued matrix, incorporating both (...)
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  34. Ulfert Gronewold, Anna Gold & Steven E. Salterio (2013). Reporting Self-Made Errors: The Impact of Organizational Error-Management Climate and Error Type. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):189-208.score: 24.0
    We study how an organization’s error-management climate affects organizational members’ beliefs about other members’ willingness to report errors that they discover when chance of error detection by superiors and others is extremely low. An error-management climate, as a component of the organizational climate, is said to be “high” when errors are accepted as part of everyday life as long as they are learned from and not repeated. Alternatively, the error-management climate is said to be an “error averse” climate (...)
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  35. Seremeti Lambrini & Kameas Achilles (forthcoming). Composable Relations Induced in Networks of Aligned Ontologies: A Category Theoretic Approach. Axiomathes:1-27.score: 24.0
    A network of aligned ontologies is a distributed system, whose components (constituent ontologies) are interacting and interoperating, the result of this interaction being, either the extension of local assertions, which are valid within each individual ontology, to global assertions holding between remote ontology syntactic entities (concepts, individuals) through a network path, or to local assertions holding between local entities of an ontology, but induced by remote ontologies, through a cycle in the network. The mechanism for achieving this interaction is the (...)
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  36. John Voiklis & James E. Corter (2012). Conventional Wisdom: Negotiating Conventions of Reference Enhances Category Learning. Cognitive Science 36 (4):607-634.score: 24.0
    Collaborators generally coordinate their activities through communication, during which they readily negotiate a shared lexicon for activity-related objects. This social-pragmatic activity both recruits and affects cognitive and social-cognitive processes ranging from selective attention to perspective taking. We ask whether negotiating reference also facilitates category learning or might private verbalization yield comparable facilitation? Participants in three referential conditions learned to classify imaginary creatures according to combinations of functional features—nutritive and destructive—that implicitly defined four categories. Remote partners communicated in the Dialogue (...)
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  37. Miguel A. García-Pérez & Rocío Alcalá-Quintana (2012). Response Errors Explain the Failure of Independent-Channels Models of Perception of Temporal Order. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Independent-channels models of perception of temporal order (also referred to as threshold models or perceptual latency models) have been ruled out because two formal properties of these models (monotonicity and parallelism) are not borne out by data from ternary tasks in which observers must judge whether stimulus A was presented before, after, or simultaneously with stimulus B. These models generally assume that observed responses are authentic indicators of unobservable judgments, but blinks, lapses of attention, or errors in pressing the (...)
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  38. Michelle R. Greene (2013). Statistics of High-Level Scene Context. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Context is critical to our ability to recognize environments and to search for objects within them: contextual associations have been shown to modulate reaction time and object recognition accuracy, as well as influence the distribution of eye movements and patterns of brain activations. However, we have not yet systematically quantified the relationships between objects and their scene environments. Here I seek to fill this gap by providing descriptive statistics of object-scene relationships. A total of 48,167 objects were hand-labeled in 3499 (...)
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  39. Rocío Alcalá-Quintana Miguel A. García-Pérez (2012). Response Errors Explain the Failure of Independent-Channels Models of Perception of Temporal Order. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Independent-channels models of perception of temporal order (also referred to as threshold models or perceptual latency models) have been ruled out because two formal properties of these models (monotonicity and parallelism) are not borne out by data from ternary tasks in which observers must judge whether stimulus A was presented before, after, or simultaneously with stimulus B. These models generally assume that observed responses are authentic indicators of unobservable judgments, but blinks, lapses of attention, or errors in pressing the (...)
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  40. Alessandro Stavru (2014). CORNELLI, G. (2013). In Search of Pythagoreanism. Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, “Studia Praesocratica” 4, de Gruyter, Berlin. [REVIEW] Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 13 (13):171-173.score: 24.0
    CORNELLI, G. (2013). In Search of Pythagoreanism. Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, “Studia Praesocratica” 4, de Gruyter, Berlin.
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  41. Teresa Bajo Carolina Yudes, Pedro Macizo (2011). The Influence of Expertise in Simultaneous Interpreting on Non-Verbal Executive Processes. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    This study aimed to explore non-verbal executive processes in simultaneous interpreters. Simultaneous interpreters, bilinguals without any training in simultaneous interpreting and control monolinguals performed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST, Experiment 1) and the Simon task (Experiment 2). Performance on WCST was thought to index cognitive flexibility while Simon task performance was considered an index of inhibitory processes. Simultaneous interpreters outperformed bilinguals and monolinguals on the WCST by showing reduced number of attempts to infer the rule, few errors and (...)
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  42. Sarah Sorial (forthcoming). Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement. Law and Philosophy:1-26.score: 24.0
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form rather than content leads to categorization (...)
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  43. Martha Spilioti, Athanasios Evangeliou, Despoina Tramma, Zoe Theodoridou, Spyridon Metaxas, Eleni Michailidi, Eleni Bonti, Helen Frysira, Katerina Haidopoulou & Despoina Asprangathou (2013). Evidence for Treatable Inborn Errors of Metabolism in a Cohort of 187 Greek Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:858.score: 24.0
    We screened for the presence of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in 187 children (105 males; 82 females, ages 4 -14 years old) who presented with confirmed features of ASD. Twelve patients (7%) manifested increased 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-OH-IVA) excretion in urine, and minor to significant improvement in autistic features was observed in seven patients following supplementation with biotin. Five diagnoses included: Lesch Nyhan syndrome (2), succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (2) and phenylketonuria (1) (2.7%). Additional metabolic disturbances suggestive of (...)
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  44. Juan R. Vidal, Tomás Ossandón, Karim Jerbi, Sarang S. Dalal, Lorella Minotti, Philippe Ryvlin, Philippe Kahane & Jean-Philippe Lachaux (2010). Category-Specific Visual Responses: An Intracranial Study Comparing Gamma, Beta, Alpha, and ERP Response Selectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 24.0
    The specificity of neural responses to visual objects is a major topic in visual neuroscience. In humans, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified several regions of the occipital and temporal lobe that appear specific to faces, letter-strings, scenes, or tools. Direct electrophysiological recordings in the visual cortical areas of epileptic patients have largely confirmed this modular organization, using either single-neuron peri-stimulus time-histogram or intracerebral event-related potentials (iERP). In parallel, a new research stream has emerged using high-frequency gamma-band activity (...)
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  45. Min Wang, Keiko Koda & Charles A. Perfetti (2003). Alphabetic and Nonalphabetic L1 Effects in English Word Identification: A Comparison of Korean and Chinese English L2 Learners. [REVIEW] Cognition 87 (2):129-149.score: 24.0
    Different writing systems in the world select different units of spoken language for mapping. Do these writing system differences influence how first language (L1) literacy experiences affect cognitive processes in learning to read a second language (L2)? Two groups of college students who were learning to read English as a second language (ESL) were examined for their relative reliance on phonological and orthographic processing in English word identification: Korean students with an alphabetic L1 literacy background, and Chinese students with a (...)
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  46. Nadeem Hussain (2010). Error Theory and Fictionalism. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.score: 22.0
    This paper surveys contemporary accounts of error theory and fictionalism. It introduces these categories to those new to metaethics by beginning with moral nihilism, the view that nothing really is right or wrong. One main motivation is that the scientific worldview seems to have no place for rightness or wrongness. Within contemporary metaethics there is a family of theories that makes similar claims. These are the theories that are usually classified as forms of error theory or fictionalism though there are (...)
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  47. Andy Hamilton (2009). Memory and Self-Consciousness: Immunity to Error Through Misidentification. [REVIEW] Synthese 171 (3):409 - 417.score: 22.0
    In The Blue Book, Wittgenstein defined a category of uses of “I” which he termed “I”-as-subject, contrasting them with “I”-as-object uses. The hallmark of this category is immunity to error through misidentification (IEM). This article extends Wittgenstein’s characterisation to the case of memory-judgments, discusses the significance of IEM for self-consciousness—developing the idea that having a first-person thought involves thinking about oneself in a distinctive way in which one cannot think of anyone or anything else—and refutes a common objection (...)
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  48. Terry Horgan & Matjaž Potrč (2013). Epistemological Skepticism, Semantic Blindness, and Competence-Based Performance Errors. Acta Analytica 28 (2):161-177.score: 22.0
    The semantic blindness objection to contextualism challenges the view that there is no incompatibility between (i) denials of external-world knowledge in contexts where radical-deception scenarios are salient, and (ii) affirmations of external-world knowledge in contexts where such scenarios are not salient. Contextualism allegedly attributes a gross and implausible form of semantic incompetence in the use of the concept of knowledge to people who are otherwise quite competent in its use; this blindness supposedly consists in wrongly judging that there is genuine (...)
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  49. Frederick Rosen (2006). The Philosophy of Error and Liberty of Thought: J.S. Mill on Logical Fallacies. Informal Logic 26 (2):121-147.score: 22.0
    Most recent discussions of John Stuart Mill’s System of Logic (1843) neglect the fifth book concerned with logical fallacies. Mill not only follows the revival of interest in the traditional Aristotelian doctrine of fallacies in Richard Whately and Augustus De Morgan, but he also develops new categories and an original analysis which enhance the study of fallacies within the context of what he calls ‘the philosophy of error’. After an exploration of this approach, the essay relates the philosophy of error (...)
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  50. Ana Blanco Canales & Marta Nogueroles López (2013). Descripción Y Categorización De Errores Fónicos En Estudiantes De Español/L2. Validación De La Taxonomía De Errores AACFELE. Logos: Revista de Lingüística, Filosofía y Literatura 23 (2):196-225.score: 22.0
    Within the field of didactics of second language teaching, it is believed that phonic errors cannot be completely corrected due to the significant influence of L1. However, improving the processes of acquisition of an L2 implies learning pronunciation properly. Given the importance of pronunciation for communication, it is necessary to deeply know the nature of phonic errors, which requires a specific classification aimed to describe, classify and categorize them. This article is intended to test the validity and efficiency (...)
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