Search results for 'Category Errors' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  82
    Walter J. Freeman (1997). Three Centuries of Category Errors in Studies of the Neural Basis of Consciousness and Intentionality. Neural Networks 10:1175-83.
  2. Alfred I. Tauber (1999). The Elusive Immune Self: A Case of Category Errors. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (4):459-474.
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  3. Ronald W. Pies (2015). Anorexia Nervosa, “Futility,” and Category Errors. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):44-46.
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  4.  8
    Mark R. Blair, Marcus R. Watson & Kimberly M. Meier (2009). Errors, Efficiency, and the Interplay Between Attention and Category Learning. Cognition 112 (2):330-336.
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  5.  4
    Phebe Cramer & Morris Eagle (1972). Relationship Between Conditions of CRS Presentation and the Category of False Recognition Errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (1):1.
  6.  15
    Manuel de Pinedo-Garcia & Jason Noble (2008). Beyond Persons: Extending the Personal/Subpersonal Distinction to Non-Rational Animals and Artificial Agents. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):87-100.
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  7.  8
    Tobin Nellhaus (2013). The Necessity of Errors. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):129 - 135.
    The Necessity of Errors Content Type Journal Article Category Review Pages 129-135 Authors Tobin Nellhaus Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 12 Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 1 / 2013.
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  8.  3
    Shelbie L. Sutherland, Andrei Cimpian, Sarah‐Jane Leslie & Susan A. Gelman (2015). Memory Errors Reveal a Bias to Spontaneously Generalize to Categories. Cognitive Science 39 (5):1021-1046.
    Much evidence suggests that, from a young age, humans are able to generalize information learned about a subset of a category to the category itself. Here, we propose that—beyond simply being able to perform such generalizations—people are biased to generalize to categories, such that they routinely make spontaneous, implicit category generalizations from information that licenses such generalizations. To demonstrate the existence of this bias, we asked participants to perform a task in which category generalizations would distract (...)
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  9.  33
    John Corcoran & Idris Samawi Hamid (2016). Two-Method Errors: Having It Both Ways. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 21:444-5.
    ►JOHN CORCORAN AND IDRIS SAMAWI HAMID, Two-method errors: having it both ways. Philosophy, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-4150, USA E-mail: corcoran@buffalo.edu Philosophy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1781 USA E-mail: ishamid@colostate.edu Where two methods produce similar results, mixing the two sometimes creates errors we call two-method errors, TMEs: in style, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, implicature, logic, or action. This lecture analyzes examples found in technical and in non-technical contexts. One can say “Abe knows whether Ben draws” (...)
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  10. Lawrence Karlin (1951). The Influence of Equality Judgments on the Constant Error. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (5):300.
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  11.  32
    Douglas Walton & Thomas F. Gordon (2009). Jumping to a Conclusion: Fallacies and Standards of Proof. Informal Logic 29 (2):215-243.
    Five errors that fit under the category of jumping to a conclusion are identified: (1) arguing from premises that are insufficient as evidence to prove a conclusion (2) fallacious argument from ignorance, (3) arguing to a wrong conclusion, (4) using defeasible reasoning without being open to exceptions, and (5) overlooking/suppressing evidence. It is shown that jumping to a conclusion is best seen not as a fallacy itself, but as a more general category of faulty argumentation pattern underlying (...)
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  12. Jonathan Bain (2013). Category-Theoretic Structure and Radical Ontic Structural Realism. Synthese 190 (9):1621-1635.
    Radical Ontic Structural Realism (ROSR) claims that structure exists independently of objects that may instantiate it. Critics of ROSR contend that this claim is conceptually incoherent, insofar as, (i) it entails there can be relations without relata, and (ii) there is a conceptual dependence between relations and relata. In this essay I suggest that (ii) is motivated by a set-theoretic formulation of structure, and that adopting a category-theoretic formulation may provide ROSR with more support. In particular, I consider how (...)
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  13.  60
    Marcoen J. T. F. Cabbolet (2015). The Importance of Developing a Foundation for Naive Category Theory. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):237-242.
    Recently Feferman has outlined a program for the development of a foundation for naive category theory. While Ernst has shown that the resulting axiomatic system is still inconsistent, the purpose of this note is to show that nevertheless some foundation has to be developed before naive category theory can replace axiomatic set theory as a foundational theory for mathematics. It is argued that in naive category theory currently a ‘cookbook recipe’ is used for constructing categories, and it (...)
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  14.  76
    David Ellerman, On the Self-Predicative Universals of Category Theory.
    This paper shows how the universals of category theory in mathematics provide a model (in the Platonic Heaven of mathematics) for the self-predicative strand of Plato's Theory of Forms as well as for the idea of a "concrete universal" in Hegel and similar ideas of paradigmatic exemplars in ordinary thought. The paper also shows how the always-self-predicative universals of category theory provide the "opposite bookend" to the never-self-predicative universals of iterative set theory and thus that the paradoxes arose (...)
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  15.  66
    Shay Logan (2015). Category Theory is a Contentful Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 23 (1):110-115.
    Linnebo and Pettigrew present some objections to category theory as an autonomous foundation. They do a commendable job making clear several distinct senses of ‘autonomous’ as it occurs in the phrase ‘autonomous foundation’. Unfortunately, their paper seems to treat the ‘categorist’ perspective rather unfairly. Several infelicities of this sort were addressed by McLarty. In this note I address yet another apparent infelicity.
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  16.  10
    Benjamin Eva (2016). Category Theory and Physical Structuralism. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (2):231-246.
    As a metaphysical theory, radical ontic structural realism is characterised mainly in terms of the ontological primacy it places on relations and structures, as opposed to the individual relata and objects that inhabit these relations/structures. The most popular criticism of ROSR is that its central thesis is incoherent. Bain attempts to address this criticism by arguing that the mathematical language of category theory allows for a coherent articulation of ROSR’s key thesis. Subsequently, Wüthrich and Lam and Lal and Teh (...)
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  17.  67
    Giuseppe Primiero (2014). A Taxonomy of Errors for Information Systems. Minds and Machines 24 (3):249-273.
    We provide a full characterization of computational error states for information systems. The class of errors considered is general enough to include human rational processes, logical reasoning, scientific progress and data processing in some functional programming languages. The aim is to reach a full taxonomy of error states by analysing the recovery and processing of data. We conclude by presenting machine-readable checking and resolve algorithms.
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  18. Ofra Magidor (2009). Category Mistakes Are Meaningful. Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (6):553-581.
    Category mistakes are sentences such as ‘Colourless green ideas sleep furiously’ or ‘The theory of relativity is eating breakfast’. Such sentences are highly anomalous, and this has led a large number of linguists and philosophers to conclude that they are meaningless (call this ‘the meaninglessness view’). In this paper I argue that the meaninglessness view is incorrect and category mistakes are meaningful. I provide four arguments against the meaninglessness view: in Sect. 2, an argument concerning compositionality with respect (...)
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  19.  29
    Glyn W. Humphreys & Emer M. E. Forde (2001). Hierarchies, Similarity, and Interactivity in Object Recognition: “Category-Specific” Neuropsychological Deficits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):453-476.
    Category-specific impairments of object recognition and naming are among the most intriguing disorders in neuropsychology, affecting the retrieval of knowledge about either living or nonliving things. They can give us insight into the nature of our representations of objects: Have we evolved different neural systems for recognizing different categories of object? What kinds of knowledge are important for recognizing particular objects? How does visual similarity within a category influence object recognition and representation? What is the nature of our (...)
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  20.  29
    Joseph J. Williams & Tania Lombrozo (2010). The Role of Explanation in Discovery and Generalization: Evidence From Category Learning. Cognitive Science 34 (5):776-806.
    Research in education and cognitive development suggests that explaining plays a key role in learning and generalization: When learners provide explanations—even to themselves—they learn more effectively and generalize more readily to novel situations. This paper proposes and tests a subsumptive constraints account of this effect. Motivated by philosophical theories of explanation, this account predicts that explaining guides learners to interpret what they are learning in terms of unifying patterns or regularities, which promotes the discovery of broad generalizations. Three experiments provide (...)
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  21.  57
    David Ellerman (forthcoming). On Concrete Universals: A Modern Treatment Using Category Theory. AL-MUKHATABAT.
    Today it would be considered "bad Platonic metaphysics" to think that among all the concrete instances of a property there could be a universal instance so that all instances had the property by virtue of participating in that concrete universal. Yet there is a mathematical theory, category theory, dating from the mid-20th century that shows how to precisely model concrete universals within the "Platonic Heaven" of mathematics. This paper, written for the philosophical logician, develops this category-theoretic treatment of (...)
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  22.  17
    John Voiklis & James E. Corter (2012). Conventional Wisdom: Negotiating Conventions of Reference Enhances Category Learning. Cognitive Science 36 (4):607-634.
    Collaborators generally coordinate their activities through communication, during which they readily negotiate a shared lexicon for activity-related objects. This social-pragmatic activity both recruits and affects cognitive and social-cognitive processes ranging from selective attention to perspective taking. We ask whether negotiating reference also facilitates category learning or might private verbalization yield comparable facilitation? Participants in three referential conditions learned to classify imaginary creatures according to combinations of functional features—nutritive and destructive—that implicitly defined four categories. Remote partners communicated in the Dialogue (...)
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  23. E. J. Lowe (2006). The Four-Category Ontology: A Metaphysical Foundation for Natural Science. Oxford University Press.
    E. J. <span class='Hi'>Lowe</span>, a prominent figure in contemporary metaphysics, sets out and defends his theory of what there is. His four-category ontology is a metaphysical system which recognizes four fundamental categories of beings: substantial and non-substantial particulars and substantial and non-substantial universals. <span class='Hi'>Lowe</span> argues that this system has an explanatory power which is unrivaled by more parsimonious theories and that this counts decisively in its favor. He shows that it provides a powerful explanatory framework for a unified (...)
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  24. Jan Westerhoff (2002). Defining 'Ontological Category'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (3):287–293.
    Although a considerable degree of precision has been introduced both into the formulation and the discussion of ontological theories by the use of formal methods there is still a remarkable indefiniteness about foundational issues. In particular it is not clear what an ontological category is and why we regard something as an ontological category. This is amazing given that the notion of ontological category is in fact the most basic of the whole of ontology: it is what (...)
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  25.  11
    Min Wang, Keiko Koda & Charles A. Perfetti (2003). Alphabetic and Nonalphabetic L1 Effects in English Word Identification: A Comparison of Korean and Chinese English L2 Learners. [REVIEW] Cognition 87 (2):129-149.
    Different writing systems in the world select different units of spoken language for mapping. Do these writing system differences influence how first language (L1) literacy experiences affect cognitive processes in learning to read a second language (L2)? Two groups of college students who were learning to read English as a second language (ESL) were examined for their relative reliance on phonological and orthographic processing in English word identification: Korean students with an alphabetic L1 literacy background, and Chinese students with a (...)
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  26.  45
    Michael John Healy & Thomas Preston Caudell (2006). Ontologies and Worlds in Category Theory: Implications for Neural Systems. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 16 (1-2):165-214.
    We propose category theory, the mathematical theory of structure, as a vehicle for defining ontologies in an unambiguous language with analytical and constructive features. Specifically, we apply categorical logic and model theory, based upon viewing an ontology as a sub-category of a category of theories expressed in a formal logic. In addition to providing mathematical rigor, this approach has several advantages. It allows the incremental analysis of ontologies by basing them in an interconnected hierarchy of theories, with (...)
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  27.  47
    C. J. Isham (2005). Quantising on a Category. Foundations of Physics 35 (2):271-297.
    We review the problem of finding a general framework within which one can construct quantum theories of non-standard models for space, or space-time. The starting point is the observation that entities of this type can typically be regarded as objects in a category whose arrows are structure-preserving maps. This motivates investigating the general problem of quantising a system whose ‘configuration space’ (or history-theory analogue) is the set of objects Ob(Q) in a category Q. We develop a scheme based (...)
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  28.  53
    Paul Livingston (2012). Badiou and the Politics of Form. Philosophy Compass 7 (5):304-315.
    In this essay, I explore Alain Badiou’s longstanding project of theorizing political situations and political transformation through the analysis of forms and formalisms. This amounts, I argue, to a politics of form that draws on the thought of Sartre, Althusser, and Lacan, but offers new alternatives for political thought and action today. In particular, Badiou’s rigorous consideration of forms, which draws on mathematics, model theory, set theory, and category theory, allows him to theorize political change in a way that (...)
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  29.  1
    Shokoofeh Ghorbani, Esfandiar Eslami & Abbas Hasankhani (2009). On the Category of Hyper MV‐Algebras. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 55 (1):21-30.
    In this paper we study the category of hyper MV-algebras and we prove that it has a terminal object and a coequalizer. We show that Jia's construction can be modified to provide a free hyper MV-algebra by a set. We use this to show that in the category of hyper MV-algebras the monomorphisms are exactly the one-to-one homomorphisms.
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  30.  3
    James McKeahnie (forthcoming). IP’ Moral Rights Breaches Are Deception Offences, Not Property Offences: Correcting a Category Error. Res Publica:1-15.
    In March of 2014 Nature Publishing Group, responsible for the publication of journals such as Nature and Scientific American, was subject to criticism for its requirement that contributing authors waive their moral rights in relation to their published articles. Some of the rights included under the umbrella term ‘moral rights’ are the right to have any copies of one’s work reproduced accurately and without alteration; the right to the accurate attribution of one’s work under one’s own name; and the right (...)
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  31.  10
    Sarah Sorial (2015). Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement. Law and Philosophy 34 (3):299-324.
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form rather than content leads to categorization (...)
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  32.  5
    Mark P. Holden, Nora S. Newcombe, Ilyse Resnick & Thomas F. Shipley (2016). Seeing Like a Geologist: Bayesian Use of Expert Categories in Location Memory. Cognitive Science 40 (2):440-454.
    Memory for spatial location is typically biased, with errors trending toward the center of a surrounding region. According to the category adjustment model, this bias reflects the optimal, Bayesian combination of fine-grained and categorical representations of a location. However, there is disagreement about whether categories are malleable. For instance, can categories be redefined based on expert-level conceptual knowledge? Furthermore, if expert knowledge is used, does it dominate other information sources, or is it used adaptively so as to minimize (...)
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  33.  55
    David Theo Goldberg (1990). Racism and Rationality: The Need for a New Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (3):317-350.
    Two classes of argument, logical and moral, are usually offered for the general assumption that racism is inherently irrational. The logical arguments involve accusations concerning stereotyping (category mistakes and empirical errors resulting from overgeneralization) as well as inconsistencies between attitudes and behavior and inconsistencies in beliefs. Moral arguments claim that racism fails as means to well-defined ends, or that racist acts achieve ends other than moral ones. Based on a rationality-neutral definition of racism, it is argued in this (...)
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  34.  50
    Walter J. Freeman (1999). Neurogenetic Determinism is a Theological Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):893-894.
    In “Lifelines” Steven Rose constructs a case against neurogenetic determinism based on experimental data from biology and in favor of a significant degree of self determination. Two philosophical errors in the case favoring neurogenetic determinism are illustrated by Rose: category mistakes and an excessively narrow view of causality restricted to the linear form.
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  35.  14
    Michael Maratsos (2001). How Fast Does a Child Learn a Word? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1111-1112.
    This discussion argues that for many word meanings, the child has to assemble a new category, using relatively slow information-sifting processes. This does not cause high semantic errors, because children probably hold off using a word until much such sifting has occurred, rather than producing the new word as soon as they have any information on it.
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  36.  7
    Aliza J. Schwartz, Aysecan Boduroglu & Angela H. Gutchess (2014). Cross‐Cultural Differences in Categorical Memory Errors. Cognitive Science 38 (5):997-1007.
    Cultural differences occur in the use of categories to aid accurate recall of information. This study investigated whether culture also contributed to false (erroneous) memories, and extended cross-cultural memory research to Turkish culture, which is shaped by Eastern and Western influences. Americans and Turks viewed word pairs, half of which were categorically related and half unrelated. Participants then attempted to recall the second word from the pair in response to the first word cue. Responses were coded as correct, as blanks, (...)
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  37. J. M. Breutzmann, J. H. Lutz & D. W. Juedes (2004). Baire Category and Nowhere Differentiability for Feasible Functions. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 50 (4):460.
    A notion of resource-bounded Baire category is developed for the class PC[0,1] of all polynomial-time computable real-valued functions on the unit interval. The meager subsets of PC[0,1] are characterized in terms of resource-bounded Banach-Mazur games. This characterization is used to prove that, in the sense of Baire category, almost every function in PC[0,1] is nowhere differentiable. This is a complexity-theoretic extension of the analogous classical result that Banach proved for the class C[0, 1] in 1931.
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  38.  7
    Seremeti Lambrini & Kameas Achilles (2015). Composable Relations Induced in Networks of Aligned Ontologies: A Category Theoretic Approach. Axiomathes 25 (3):285-311.
    A network of aligned ontologies is a distributed system, whose components are interacting and interoperating, the result of this interaction being, either the extension of local assertions, which are valid within each individual ontology, to global assertions holding between remote ontology syntactic entities through a network path, or to local assertions holding between local entities of an ontology, but induced by remote ontologies, through a cycle in the network. The mechanism for achieving this interaction is the composition of relations. In (...)
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  39.  6
    Ulfert Gronewold, Anna Gold & Steven E. Salterio (2013). Reporting Self-Made Errors: The Impact of Organizational Error-Management Climate and Error Type. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):189-208.
    We study how an organization’s error-management climate affects organizational members’ beliefs about other members’ willingness to report errors that they discover when chance of error detection by superiors and others is extremely low. An error-management climate, as a component of the organizational climate, is said to be “high” when errors are accepted as part of everyday life as long as they are learned from and not repeated. Alternatively, the error-management climate is said to be an “error averse” climate (...)
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  40.  10
    Nicolai Hartmann & Keith R. Peterson (2012). How Is Critical Ontology Possible? Toward the Foundation of the General Theory of the Categories, Part One (1923). Axiomathes 22 (3):315-354.
    This is a translation of an early essay by the German philosopher Nicolai Hartmann (1882–1950). In this 1923 essay Hartmann presents many of the fundamental ideas of his new critical ontology. He summarizes some of the main points of his critique of neo-Kantian epistemology, and provides the point of departure for his new approach in an extensive criticism of the errors of the classical ontological tradition. Some of these errors concern the definition of an ontological category or (...)
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  41.  11
    Arnon Avron & Beata Konikowska (2009). Proof Systems for Reasoning About Computation Errors. Studia Logica 91 (2):273-293.
    In the paper we examine the use of non-classical truth values for dealing with computation errors in program specification and validation. In that context, 3-valued McCarthy logic is suitable for handling lazy sequential computation, while 3-valued Kleene logic can be used for reasoning about parallel computation. If we want to be able to deal with both strategies without distinguishing between them, we combine Kleene and McCarthy logics into a logic based on a non-deterministic, 3-valued matrix, incorporating both options as (...)
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  42.  2
    Alessandro Stavru (2014). CORNELLI, G. (2013). In Search of Pythagoreanism. Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, “Studia Praesocratica” 4, de Gruyter, Berlin. [REVIEW] Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 13 (13):171-173.
    CORNELLI, G. (2013). In Search of Pythagoreanism. Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, “Studia Praesocratica” 4, de Gruyter, Berlin.
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  43.  2
    Girard J. Etzkorn (2010). Marcus of Orvieto'On the Pelican'. Franciscan Studies 68 (1):179-185.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:There are only three surviving biographical notices regarding Marcus of Orvieto: two as colophons of Vatican manuscripts and a third as an entry in a catalog of the papal library in Avignon where we read: "Item, liber de mortalitatibus septem Martini de Urbevetani Ordinis Minorum." While the spelling of the book title and its author can be attributed to scribal errors or misreadings, the 'seven,' place of origin, (...)
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  44.  29
    Peter Smith, Category Theory: A Gentle Introduction.
    This Gentle Introduction is very much still work in progress. So far, at least in a rough and ready way, we cover the basic notions of elementary category theory -- explaining the very idea of a category, then treating limits, functors, natural transformations, representables, adjunctions. The long-term plan is to go on to have a chapter on monads, and then move on to say something about categorial logic, explore categories of sets, and edge towards some initial themes in (...)
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  45.  3
    Trevor Stack, Naomi Goldenberg & Timothy Fitzgerald (eds.) (2015). Religion as a Category of Governance and Sovereignty. Brill.
    Religious-secular distinctions have been crucial to the way in which modern governments have rationalised their governance and marked out their sovereignty – as crucial as the territorial boundaries that they have drawn around nations. The authors of this volume provide a multi-dimensional picture of how the category of religion has served the ends of modern government. They draw on perspectives from history, anthropology, moral philosophy, theology and religious studies, as well as empirical analysis of India, Japan, Mexico, (...)
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  46.  12
    S. S. Stevens & E. H. Galanter (1957). Ratio Scales and Category Scales for a Dozen Perceptual Continua. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (6):377.
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  47.  35
    Ofra Magidor (forthcoming). Category Mistakes and Figurative Language. Philosophical Studies.
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  48.  5
    Benton J. Underwood & Joel S. Freund (1968). Errors in Recognition Learning and Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (1):55.
  49.  43
    William F. Battig & William E. Montague (1969). Category Norms of Verbal Items in 56 Categories A Replication and Extension of the Connecticut Category Norms. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3p2):1.
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  50.  4
    Ian Begg & J. Peter Denny (1969). Empirical Reconciliation of Atmosphere and Conversion Interpretations of Syllogistic Reasoning Errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):351.
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