Search results for 'Catherine Arciuli' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul M. McNeill, Ian H. Kerridge, Catherine Arciuli, David A. Henry, Graham J. Macdonald, Richard O. Day & Suzanne R. Hill (2006). Gifts, Drug Samples, and Other Items Given to Medical Specialists by Pharmaceutical Companies. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):139-148.score: 240.0
    Aim To ascertain the quantity and nature of gifts and items provided by the pharmaceutical industry in Australia to medical specialists and to consider whether these are appropriate in terms of justifiable ethical standards, empirical research and views expressed in the literature.
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  2. L. U. Catherine (2011). Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.score: 30.0
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  3. Joanne Arciuli & Ian C. Simpson (2012). Statistical Learning Is Related to Reading Ability in Children and Adults. Cognitive Science 36 (2):286-304.score: 30.0
    There is little empirical evidence showing a direct link between a capacity for statistical learning (SL) and proficiency with natural language. Moreover, discussion of the role of SL in language acquisition has seldom focused on literacy development. Our study addressed these issues by investigating the relationship between SL and reading ability in typically developing children and healthy adults. We tested SL using visually presented stimuli within a triplet learning paradigm and examined reading ability by administering the Wide Range Achievement Test (...)
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  4. L. Welch Catherine, E. Welch Denice & Lisa Hewerdine (2008). Gender and Export Behaviour: Evidence From Women-Owned Enterprises. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1).score: 30.0
    This article draws on the results of a qualitative, exploratory study of 20 Australian women business owners to demonstrate how using a ‹gender as social identity’ lens provides new insights into the influence of gender on exporting and entrepreneurial behaviour. Interview data reveal perceptions of gender identity and gender relations varied and influenced the interpretations which women business owners placed on their exporting activities. Women in the study used different terms to describe exporter and entrepreneurial characteristics to those found in (...)
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  5. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.score: 18.0
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on turning (...)
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  6. Lisabeth During (2000). Catherine Malabou and the Currency of Hegelianism. Hypatia 15 (4):190-195.score: 12.0
    : Catherine Malabou is a professor of philosophy at Paris-Nanterre. A collaborator and student of Jacques Derrida, her work shares some of his interest in rigorous protocols of reading, and a willingness to attend to the undercurrents of over-read and "too familiar" texts. But, as she points out, this orientation was shared by Hegel himself. Arguing against Heidegger, Kojève, and other critics of Hegel, the book in which this Introduction appears puts Hegel back on the map of the present.
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  7. Iulia Iuga (2010). Catherine Clement, Julia Kristeva, Femeia si Sacrul/ The Woman and the Sacred. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (6):198-200.score: 12.0
    Catherine Clement, Julia Kristeva, Femeia si Sacrul Editura Albatros, Bucureoti, 2001., 244 pg.
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  8. Anna Antonopoulos (1991). Writing the Mystic Body: Sexuality and Textuality in the Écriture-Féminine of Saint Catherine of Genoa. Hypatia 6 (3):185 - 207.score: 12.0
    This paper looks to evolve a discourse about the body in medieval women's mystical experience via an understanding of the life and work of Saint Catherine of Genoa as écriture-féminine. Drawing upon Catherine's resolution of binarism through the articulation of sexuality and textuality, I argue that the female mystic's experience of the body as site of struggle helps move beyond analysis of a binary experience to a politics of speaking the body directly.
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  9. Sophie Dulucq (1997). Catherine COQUERY-VIDROVITCH, Les Africaines. Histoire des femmes d'Afrique noire du XIXe au XXe siècle, Paris, Desjonquères, 1994, 291 p. [REVIEW] Clio 2:25-25.score: 12.0
    Parue en 1994, l'impressionnante synthèse de Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch sur les femmes dans les sociétés africaines contemporaines est un livre pionnier dans l'historiographie française. S'appuyant sur une considérable bibliographie (notamment en anglais) et sur ses propres recherches, l'auteur dresse le bilan des connaissances accumulées depuis deux décennies et s'attache à établir une cartographie des incertitudes et des lacunes qui demeurent. « Ce qu'il importe de comprendre, c'es..
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  10. Agnès Fine (2002). Catherine ALES et Cécile BARRAUD (dir.), Sexe relatif ou sexe absolu ?, Paris, Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l'homme, 2001, 431 p. [REVIEW] Clio 2:32-32.score: 12.0
    Le titre au premier abord énigmatique de cet ouvrage collectif d'anthropologie et le caractère très technique et parfois difficile de son contenu risquent de décourager les lecteurs non spécialistes. Aussi me paraît-il important d'en résumer la problématique tant elle paraît importante pour qui s'intéresse à la question du caractère universel de la différence des sexes et de la subordination des femmes. La lecture de l'introduction générale de Catherine Alès qui présente les différente..
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  11. Catherine E. Barton (2000). Richard M. Lerner Catherine E. Barton. In Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.), Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Erlbaum. 420.score: 12.0
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  12. D. Catherine Brown (1997). Jean Gerson D. Catherine Brown. In Jill Kraye (ed.), Cambridge Translations of Renaissance Philosophical Texts. Cambridge University Press. 3.score: 12.0
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  13. André Ferreira de Araújo (2013). AUDARD, Catherine. Cidadania e democracia deliberativa. Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS, 2006. Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 4 (8):90-96.score: 12.0
    Esta resenha versa sobre a obra Cidadania e Democracia Deliberativa de Catherine Audard que se refere à uma articulação rawlsiana entre uma teoria da justiça e as teses centrais do seu liberalismo político sobre o pluralismo razoável, democracia deliberativa, cidadania participativa, razão pública, direito dos povos e multiculturalismo.
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  14. Catherine Z. Elgin (1998). Catherine Z. Elgin. In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. 26.score: 12.0
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  15. Catherine Goldstein (2000). Documents-Essay Review: On Catherine Goldsteins Book, Un Theoreme de Fermat Et Ses Lecteurs. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (2):295.score: 12.0
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  16. Jacques Maître (1995). Sainte Catherine de sienne : patronne des anorexiques ? Clio 2:6-6.score: 12.0
    À partir du XIIIe siècle, le tableau clinique de l'anorexie mentale se présente sous la forme de l'anorexie mystique. L'exemple retenu est Catherine de Sienne († 1380). Une approche de psychanalyse socio-historique permet de situer sa démarche par rapport à ses conflits intrapsychiques et aux processus idéologiques de son époque. L'anorexie mystique apparaît comme liée à l'histoire personnelle de chacune dans sa constellation familiale comme à l'essor de la mystique affective féminine. On la trouve souvent marquée par une révolte (...)
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  17. Cyril Olivier (2003). Jean-Yves LE NAOUR, Catherine VALENTI, Histoire de l'avortement (XIXe-XXe siècle), Paris, Le Seuil, coll. « L'univers historique »), 2003, 394 p. [REVIEW] Clio 2:27-27.score: 12.0
    Jean-Yves Le Naour et Catherine Valenti proposent un ouvrage ambitieux par son propos : faire une histoire de l'avortement depuis le milieu du XIXe jusqu'à la fin du XXe siècle. Entreprise ambitieuse mais nécessaire, une telle synthèse étant inédite en France. L'idée force du livre tient donc dans sa longue durée : un siècle et demi durant lequel la question de l'avortement fut au centre de débats tant politiques, que juridiques, économiques et sociaux. Le problème est pris à bras (...)
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  18. Nicole Wyatt (2009). Failing to Do Things with Words. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):135-142.score: 9.0
    It has become standard for feminist philosophers of language to analyze Catherine MacKinnon's claim in terms of speech act theory. Backed by the Austinian observation that speech can do things and the legal claim that pornography is speech, the claim is that the speech acts performed by means of pornography silence women. This turns upon the notion of illocutionary silencing, or disablement. In this paper I observe that the focus by feminist philosophers of language on the failure to achieve (...)
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  19. Alice Crary (2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature – by Catherine Osborne. Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):191-197.score: 9.0
  20. Henry S. Richardson (2011). Interpreting Rawls: An Essay on Audard, Freeman, and Pogge. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (3):227-251.score: 9.0
    This review essay on three recent books on John Rawls’s theory of justice, by Catherine Audard, Samuel Freeman, and Thomas Pogge, describes the great boon they offer serious students of Rawls. They form a united front in firmly and definitively rebuffing Robert Nozick’s libertarian critique, Michael Sandel’s communitarian critique, and more generally critiques of “neutralist liberalism,” as well as in affirming the basic unity of Rawls’s position. At a deeper level, however, they diverge, and in ways that, this essay (...)
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  21. Pete Mandik (2009). Review of Catherine Malabou, What Should We Do with Our Brain?. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).score: 9.0
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  22. Margaret J. Osler (2009). Review of Catherine Wilson, Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).score: 9.0
  23. Charles T. Wolfe (2010). Critical Review: On Catherine Wilson'S Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):91-100.score: 9.0
  24. Kathleen Roberts Skerrett (2009). Consuetudo Carnalis in Augustine's Confessions: Confessing Identity/Belonging to Difference. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (3):495-512.score: 9.0
    The political theorist William E. Connolly reads Augustine's Confessions as an exhortation to deny the paradox of identity/difference. The paradox for Connolly is this: if one confesses a true identity, one must be false to difference, but if one is true to difference, one must sacrifice the promise of true identity. I revisit Augustine's Confessions here in order to offer a reading of their paradoxical character that contrasts with Connolly's. I will argue that Augustine's confession does not deny the paradox (...)
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  25. John Sutton (2000). Author's Response to Reviews by Catherine Wilson, Michael Mascuch, and Theo Meyering. Metascience 9 (226-237):203-37.score: 9.0
    Historical Cognitive Science I am lucky to strike three reviewers who extract so clearly my book's spirit as well as its substance. They all both accept and act on my central methodological assumption; that detailed historical research, and consideration of difficult contemporary questions about cognition and culture, can be mutually illuminating. It's gratifying to find many themes which recur in different contexts throughout _Philosophy and Memory_ _Traces_ so well articulated here. The reviews catch my desires to interweave discussion of cognitive (...)
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  26. E. Schliesser (2010). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity, by Catherine Wilson. Mind 119 (474):535-539.score: 9.0
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  27. Margaret Atkins (2010). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers – Catherine Osborne. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):436-438.score: 9.0
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  28. William Dudley (2006). Review of Catherine Malabou, The Future of Hegel: Plasticity, Temporality and Dialectic. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (10).score: 9.0
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  29. Jill Graper Hernandez (2013). The Anxious Believer: Macaulay's Prescient Theodicy. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):175-187.score: 9.0
    Recent feminists have critiqued G.W. Leibniz’s Theodicy for its effort to justify God’s role in undeserved human suffering over natural and moral evil. These critiques suggest that theodicies which focus on evil as suffering alone obfuscate how to thematize evil, and so they conclude that theodicies should be rejected and replaced with a secularized notion of evil that is inextricably tied to the experiences of the victim. This paper argues that the political philosophy found in the writings of Catherine (...)
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  30. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). How Catherine Does Go On: Northanger Abbey and Moral Thought. Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 188-200.score: 9.0
    A certain pupil with the vaguely Kafkaesque name B has mastered the series of natural numbers. B's new task is to learn how to write down other series of cardinal numbers and right now, we're working on the series "+2." After a bit, B seems to catch on, but we are unusually thorough teachers and keep him at it. Things are going just fine until he reaches 1000. Then, quite confounding us, he writes 1004, 1008, 1012."We say to him: 'Look (...)
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  31. Susan F. Parsons (2003). St Catherine of Siena's Theology of Eucharist. Heythrop Journal 44 (4):456–467.score: 9.0
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  32. Brian S. Baigrie (1998). Catherine Wilson's the Invisible World: Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (2):165 – 174.score: 9.0
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  33. Sten Ebbesen (1995). Catherine Atherton the Stoics on Ambiguity, Cambridge Classical Studies, Cambridge University Press, 1993, XIX + 563 Pp. ISBN 0 521 44139 0 (Hardback). [REVIEW] Vivarium 33 (2):242-246.score: 9.0
  34. John Protevi (2010). Review of Catherine Malabou, Plasticity at the Dusk of Writing: Dialectic, Destruction, Deconstruction. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).score: 9.0
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  35. Eduardo Abrantes (2006). The Principle of Revelation : Catherine Lupton (2005) Chris Marker: Memories of the Future. Film-Philosophy 10 (1).score: 9.0
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  36. Carole Pateman (1990). Sex and Power:Feminism Unmodified: Discourses on Life and Law. Catherine A. MacKinnon. Ethics 100 (2):398-.score: 9.0
  37. Jean Leroux (1997). Lois et symétrie Bas C. Van Fraassen Présentation et traduction par Catherine Chevalley Collection «Mathesis» Paris, Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 1994, 520 p. [REVIEW] Dialogue 36 (01):203-.score: 9.0
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  38. Kathleen Okruhlik (1994). Catherine Wilson on Leibniz's Metaphysics. Dialogue 33 (04):725-.score: 9.0
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  39. Peter Schulz (1998). Mary Catherine Baseheart, S.C.N.: Person in the World. Introduction to the Philosophy of Edith Stein. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 15 (2):137-140.score: 9.0
  40. Yvon Lafrance (2001). Cratyle PLATON Traduction Inédite, Introduction, Notes, Bibliographie Et Index Par Catherine Dalimier Collection «GF-Flammarion», No 954 Paris, Flammarion, 1998, 320 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (01):175-.score: 9.0
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  41. Margaret Atherton (1998). The Invisible World: Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope Catherine Wilson Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995, X + 280 Pp., $39.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 37 (03):650-.score: 9.0
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  42. G. H. R. Parkinson (1990). Leibniz's Metaphysics: A Historical and Comparative Study By Catherine Wilson Manchester University Press, 1989, 350 Pp., £40. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65 (253):377-.score: 9.0
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  43. Edward Johnson (2006). Review of Catherine Wilson, Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).score: 9.0
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  44. C. Harrison (1996). Book Reviews : Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love, by Catherine Osborne. Oxford University Press, 1994. Xiv+246pp.Hb. No Price. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 9 (2):115-118.score: 9.0
  45. Katherine M. D. Dunbabin (1989). Mosaics from Aquitaine Catherine Balmelle: Recueil général des mosaïques de la Gaule, IV: Province d'Aquitaine 2. Partie méridionale, suite (les pays gascons) avec la collaboration de Xavier Barral i Altet. (Xe supplément à Gallia.) Pp. 314; 20 figures in text, 203 plates (14 in colour), 1 map. Paris: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1987. Paper, 360 frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):120-122.score: 9.0
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  46. Alastair Hamilton (2010). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. By Catherine Wilson and Letters Concerning the Love of God. By Mary Astell and John Norris. Edited by E. Derek Taylor and Melvyn New. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):146-147.score: 9.0
  47. Jan Marten Ivo Klaver (2008). Francis Bacon and the Refiguring of Early Modern Thought: Essays to Commemorate 'the Advancement of Learning' (1605–2005). Edited by Julie Robin Solomon and Catherine Gimelli Martin. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 49 (4):682–683.score: 9.0
  48. Liam Murphy (2006). Catherine Wilson, Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory:Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. Ethics 116 (3):618-622.score: 9.0
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  49. Adrian Peperzak (2003). Review of Catherine Chalier, What Ought I to Do? Morality in Kant and Levinas. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (4).score: 9.0
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  50. Clifford Allbutt (1924). Hippocrates Hippocrates. With English Translation by W. H. S. Jones, St. Catherine's College, Cambridge (Loeb Classical Library.) Vol. II. Pp. Lvi+336: London: Heinemann; New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1923. Hippocrates and His Successors in Relation to the Philosophy of Their Time. By R. O. Moon, M.D., F.R.C.P. The Fitzpatrick Lectures, R.C.P., 1921–22. London: Longmans, 1923. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (7-8):175-177.score: 9.0
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