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Profile: Catherine Driscoll (North Carolina State University)
  1. Catherine Driscoll (forthcoming). Constructive Criticism: An Evaluation of Buller and Hardcastle's Genetic and Neuroscientific Arguments Against Evolutionary Psychology. :1-19.
    Constructive Criticism: An evaluation of Buller and Hardcastle’s genetic and neuroscientific arguments against Evolutionary Psychology. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2013.785068.
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  2. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review:The Philosophy of Human EvolutionMichael Ruse , The Philosophy of Human Evolution . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2012), 282 Pp., $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.
  3. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review: The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.
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  4. Catherine Driscoll (2012). Evolution and the Loss of Hierarchies: Dubreuil's “Human Evolution and the Origin of Hierarchies: The State of Nature”. Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):125-135.
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  5. Catherine Driscoll (2009). On Our Best Behavior: Optimality Models in Human Behavioral Ecology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (2):133-141.
  6. Catherine Driscoll (2009). Grandmothers, Hunters and Human Life History. Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):665-686.
    This paper critiques the competing “Grandmother Hypothesis” and “Embodied Capital Theory” as evolutionary explanations of the peculiarities of human life history traits. Instead, I argue that the correct explanation for human life history probably involves elements of both hypotheses: long male developmental periods and lives probably evolved due to group selection for male hunting via increased female fertility, and female long lives due to the differential contribution women’s complex foraging skills made to their children and grandchildren’s nutritional status within groups (...)
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  7. Catherine Driscoll (2008). The Problem of Adaptive Individual Choice in Cultural Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):101-113.
    This paper tries to explain how individuals manage adaptive individual choice (i.e., the decision to acquire a fitter than average behavior or idea rapidly and tractably) in cultural evolution, despite the fact that acquiring fitness information is very difficult. I argue that the means of solving this problem suggested in the cultural evolution literature largely are various types of decision rules employing representations of fitness correlated properties or states of affairs. I argue that the problem of adaptive individual choice is (...)
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  8. Catherine Driscoll (2006). The Bowerbirds and the Bees: Miller on Art, Altruism, and Sexual Selection. Philosophical Psychology 19 (4):507 – 526.
    Geoffrey Miller argues that we can account for the evolution of human art and altruism via the action of sexual selection. He identifies five characteristics supposedly unique to sexual adaptations: fitness indicating cost; involvement in courtship; heritability; variability; and sexual differentiation. Miller claims that art and altruism possess these characteristics. I argue that not only does he not demonstrate that art and altruism possess these characteristics, one can also explain the origins of altruism via a form of group selection and (...)
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  9. Catherine Driscoll (2005). Killing Babies: Hrdy on the Evolution of Infanticide. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):271-289.
    Sarah Hrdy argues that women (1) possess a reproductive behavioral strategy including infanticide, (2) that this strategy is an adaptation and (3) arose as a response to stresses mothers faced with the agrarian revolution. I argue that while psychopathological and cultural evolutionary accounts for Hrdy's data fail, her suggested psychological architecture for the strategy suggests that the behavior she describes is really only the consequence of the operation of practical reasoning mechanism(s) – and consequently there is no reproductive strategy including (...)
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  10. Catherine Driscoll (2004). Can Behaviors Be Adaptations? Philosophy of Science 71 (1):16-35.
    Kim Sterelny and Paul Griffiths (Sterelny 1992, Sterelny and Griffiths 1999) have argued that sociobiology is unworkable because it requires that human behaviors can be adaptations; however, behaviors produced by a functionalist psychology do not meet Lewontin's quasi-independence criterion and therefore cannot be adaptations. Consequently, an evolutionary psychologywhich regards psychological mechanisms as adaptationsshould replace sociobiology. I address two interpretations of their argument. I argue that the strong interpretation fails because functionalist psychology need not prevent behaviors from evolving independently, and it (...)
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