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Catherine Z. Elgin [66]Catherine Elgin [10]
  1. Catherine Z. Elgin (forthcoming). Representation, Comprehension, and Competence. Social Research.
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  2. Catherine Z. Elgin (forthcoming). Sign, Symbol, and System. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  3. Catherine Z. Elgin (2014). Fiction as Thought Experiment. Perspectives on Science 22 (2):221-241.
    Jonathan Bennett (1974) maintains that Huckleberry Finn’s deliberations about whether to return Jim to slavery afford insight into the tension between sympathy and moral judgment; Miranda Fricker (2007) argues that the trial scene in To Kill a Mockingbird affords insight into the nature of testimonial injustice. Neither claims merely that the works prompt an attentive reader to think something new or to change her mind. Rather, they consider the reader cognitively better off for her encounters with the novels. Nor is (...)
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  4. Catherine Z. Elgin (2013). Reply to Van Cleve. In Matthias Steup & John Turri (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Epistemology. Blackwell. 267.
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  5. Catherine Z. Elgin (2012). Begging to Differ. The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):77-82.
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  6. Catherine Z. Elgin (2012). Ejemplos elocuentes. Enrahonar 49:69-89.
    Se considera que la ciencia es el espejo de la naturaleza, mientras que el arte imita la vida. De ser así, las representaciones en ambas disciplinas deberían asemejarse a sus objetos. En contra de tales teorías miméticas, argumento que la ejemplificación y no la simple semejanza es crucial. Explico en qué consiste la ejemplificación: una relación referencial de un ejemplar con alguna de sus características. Puesto que la ejemplificación es selectiva, un ejemplar puede diferir de su referente en aspectos no (...)
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  7. Catherine Z. Elgin (2012). Making Manifest: The Role of Exemplification in the Sciences and the Arts. Principia 15 (3):399-413.
    Exemplification is the relation of an example to whatever it is an example of. Goodman maintains that exemplification is a symptom of the aesthetic: although not a necessary condition, it is an indicator that symbol is functioning aesthetically. I argue that exemplification is as important in science as it is in art. It is the vehicle by which experiments make aspects of nature manifest. I suggest that the difference between exemplars in the arts and the sciences lies in the way (...)
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  8. Catherine Z. Elgin (2011). The Legacy of" Two Dogmas". American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):267.
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  9. Catherine Z. Elgin (2010). Keeping Things in Perspective. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 150 (3):439 - 447.
    Scientific realism holds that scientific representations are utterly objective. They describe the way the world is, independent of any point of view. In Scientific Representation, van Fraassen argues otherwise. If science is to afford an understanding of nature, it must be grounded in evidence. Since evidence is perspectivai, science cannot vindicate its claims using only utterly objective representations. For science to do its epistemic job, it must involve perspectivai representations. I explicate this argument and show its power.
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  10. Catherine Z. Elgin (2010). Persistent Disagreement. In Richard Feldman & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Disagreement. Oup Oxford.
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  11. Catherine Z. Elgin (2010). Review of Henk W. De Regt, Sabina Leonelli, Kai Eigner (Eds.), Scientific Understanding: Philosophical Perspectives. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (1).
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  12. Catherine Z. Elgin (2010). 13 Skepticism Aside. In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O.’Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.), Knowledge and Skepticism. Mit Press. 309.
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  13. James W. McAllister, Lars Bergström, James Robert Brown, Martin Carrier, Nancy Cartwright, Jiwei Ci, David Davies, Catherine Elgin, Márta Fehér & Michel Ghins (2010). First Page Preview. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4).
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  14. Catherine Elgin (2009). Exemplification, Idealization, and Scientific Understanding. In Mauricio Suárez (ed.), Fictions in Science: Philosophical Essays on Modeling and Idealization. Routledge. 4--77.
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  15. Catherine Elgin (2009). Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  16. Catherine Elgin (2009). ``Is Understanding Factive?&Quot. In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 322--30.
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  17. Catherine Z. Elgin (2009). Art and Education. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. 319.
  18. Catherine Z. Elgin (2009). Construction and Cognition. Theoria 24 (2):135-146.
    The Structure of Appearance presents a phenomenalist system, constructing enduring visible objects out of qualia. Nevertheless Goodman does not espouse phenomenalism. This is not because he considers his system inadequate. Although details remain to be filled in, he considers his system viable. And he believes his constructional methods could readily yield extensions to other sensory realms. Why isn’t Goodman a phenomenalist? This paper suggests an answer that illuminates Goodman’s views about the nature and functions of constructional systems, the prospects of (...)
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  19. Catherine Z. Elgin (2008). Philosophical Papers 27 (2008), 371-387. Trustworthiness. Philosophical Papers 27:371-387.
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  20. Catherine Z. Elgin (2008). Trustworthiness. Philosophical Papers 37 (3):371-387.
    I argue that trustworthiness is an epistemic desideratum. It does not reduce to justified or reliable true belief, but figures in the reason why justified or reliable true beliefs are often valuable. Such beliefs can be precarious. If a belief's being justified requires that the evidence be just as we take it to be, then if we are off even by a little, the belief is unwarranted. Similarly for reliability. Although it satisfies the definition of knowledge, such a belief is (...)
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  21. Catherine Elgin (2007). Understanding and the Facts. Philosophical Studies 132 (1):33 - 42.
    If understanding is factive, the propositions that express an understanding are true. I argue that a factive conception of understanding is unduly restrictive. It neither reflects our practices in ascribing understanding nor does justice to contemporary science. For science uses idealizations and models that do not mirror the facts. Strictly speaking, they are false. By appeal to exemplification, I devise a more generous, flexible conception of understanding that accommodates science, reflects our practices, and shows a sufficient but not slavish sensitivity (...)
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  22. Catherine Z. Elgin (2007). La fusione di fatto e valore. Iride 20 (1):83-104.
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  23. Catherine Elgin (2006). From Knowledge to Understanding. In Stephen Cade Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Oxford University Press. 199--215.
     
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  24. Catherine Elgin (2005). Non-Foundationalist Epistemology: Holism, Coherence, and Tenability. In Steup Matthias & Sosa Ernest (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Epistemology. Blackwell. 156--67.
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  25. Catherine Z. Elgin (2005). Eine Neubestimmung der Ästhetik. Goodmans epistemische Wende. In Nelson Goodman, Jakob Steinbrenner, Oliver R. Scholz & Gerhard Ernst (eds.), Symbole, Systeme, Welten: Studien Zur Philosophie Nelson Goodmans. Synchron.
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  26. Catherine Z. Elgin (2005). Review: Williams on Truthfulness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):343 - 352.
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  27. Catherine Z. Elgin (2005). Word Giving, Word Taking. In David Wood & José Medina (eds.), Truth: Engagements Across Philosophical Traditions. Blackwell Pub.. 271--287.
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  28. Catherine Z. Elgin (2004). Denying a Dualism: Goodman's Repudiation of the Analytic/Synthetic Distinction. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):226–238.
  29. Catherine Z. Elgin (2004). Optional Stops, Foregone Conclusions, and the Value of Argument. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):317-329.
    If the point of argument is to produce conviction, an argument tor a foregone conclusion is pointless. I maintain, however, that an argument makes a variety of cognitive contributions, even when its conclusion is already believed. It exhibits warrant. It affords reasons that we can impart to others. It identifies bases tor agreement among parties who otherwise disagree. It underwrites confidence, by showing how vulnerable warrant is under changes in background assumptions. Multiple arguments for the same conclusion show how our (...)
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  30. Catherine Z. Elgin (2004). Richard Foley's Intellectual Trust in Oneself and Others. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):724–734.
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  31. Catherine Z. Elgin (2004). True Enough. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):113–131.
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  32. Catherine Z. Elgin (2002). Art in the Advancement of Understanding. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):1 - 12.
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  33. Catherine Z. Elgin (2002). Creation as Reconfiguration: Art in the Advancement of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):13 – 25.
    Cognitive advancement is not always a matter of acquiring new information. It often consists in reconfiguration--in reorganizing a domain so that hitherto overlooked or underemphasized features, patterns, opportunities, and resources come to light. Several modes of reconfiguration prominent in the arts--metaphor, fiction, exemplification, and perspective--play important roles in science as well. They do not perform the same roles as literal, descriptive, perspectiveless scientific truths. But to understand how science advances understanding, we need to appreciate the ineliminable cognitive contributions of non-literal, (...)
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  34. Catherine Z. Elgin (2002). Take It From Me: The Epistemological Status of Testimony. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):291-308.
    Testimony consists in imparting information without supplying evidence or argument to back one's claims. To what extent does testimony convey epistemic warrant? C. J. A. Coady argues, on Davidsonian grounds, that (1) most testimony is true, hence (2) most testimony supplies warrant sufficient for knowledge. I appeal to Grice's maxims to undermine Coady's argument and to show that the matter is more complicated and context-sensitive than is standardly recognized. Informative exchanges take place within networks of shared, tacit assumptions that affect (...)
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  35. Catherine Z. Elgin (2002). Take It From Me. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):291-308.
    Testimony consists in imparting information without supplying evidence or argument to back one’s claims. To what extent does testimony convey epistemic warrant? C. J. A. Coady argues, on Davidsonian grounds, that (1) most testimony is true, hence (2) most testimony supplies warrant sufficient for knowledge. I appeal to Grice’s maxims to undermine Coady’s argument and to show that the matter is more complicated and context-sensitive than is standardly recognized. Informative exchanges take place within networks of shared, tacit assumptions that affect (...)
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  36. Catherine Z. Elgin (2001). The Legacy of Nelson Goodman. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):679-690.
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  37. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). Interpretation and Understanding. Erkenntnis 52 (2):175-183.
    To understand a term or other symbol, I argue that it is generally neither necessary nor sufficient to assign it a unique determinate reference. Independent of and prior to investigation, it is frequently indeterminate not only whether a sentence is true, but also what its truth conditions are. Nelson Goodman's discussions of likeness of meaning are deployed to explain how this can be so.
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  38. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). In Memoriam: Nelson Goodman. Erkenntnis 52 (2):149 -.
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  39. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). Reorienting Aesthetics, Reconceiving Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):219-225.
  40. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). Worldmaker: Nelson Goodman 1906–1998. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 31 (1):1-18.
  41. Catherine Z. Elgin (1999). Education and the Advancement of Understanding. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:131-140.
    Understanding, as I construe it, is holistic. It is a matter of how commitments mesh to form a mutually supportive, independently supported system of thought. It is advanced by bootstrapping. We start with what we think we know and build from there. This makes education continuous with what goes on at the cutting edge of inquiry. Methods, standards, categories and stances are as important as facts. So something like E. D. Hirsch’s list of facts every fourth grader should know is (...)
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  42. Catherine Z. Elgin (1999). Epistemology's Ends, Pedagogy's Prospects'. Facta Philosophica 1:39-54.
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  43. Catherine Z. Elgin, Israel Scheffler & Robert Schwartz (1999). Nelson Goodman 1906-1998. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 72 (5):206 - 208.
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  44. Catherine Z. Elgin (1998). Catherine Z. Elgin. In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. 26.
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  45. Catherine Z. Elgin (1997). Between the Absolute and the Arbitrary. Cornell University Press.
    In Between the Absolute and the Arbitrary, Catherine Z. Elgin maps a constructivist alternative to the standard Anglo-American conception of philosophy's ...
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  46. Catherine Z. Elgin (ed.) (1997). Nominalism, Constructivism, and Relativism in the Work of Nelson Goodman. Garland Pub..
    A challenger of traditions and boundaries A pivotal figure in 20th-century philosophy, Nelson Goodman has made seminal contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, and the philosophy of language, with surprising connections that cut across traditional boundaries. In the early 1950s, Goodman, Quine, and White published a series of papers that threatened to torpedo fundamental assumptions of traditional philosophy. They advocated repudiating analyticity, necessity, and prior assumptions. Some philosophers, realizing the seismic effects repudiation would cause, argued that philosophy should retain the familiar (...)
     
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  47. Catherine Z. Elgin (ed.) (1997). Nelson Goodman's New Riddle of Induction. Garland Pub..
    A challenger of traditions and boundaries A pivotal figure in 20th-century philosophy, Nelson Goodman has made seminal contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, and the philosophy of language, with surprising connections that cut across traditional boundaries. In the early 1950s, Goodman, Quine, and White published a series of papers that threatened to torpedo fundamental assumptions of traditional philosophy. They advocated repudiating analyticity, necessity, and prior assumptions. Some philosophers, realizing the seismic effects repudiation would cause, argued that philosophy should retain the familiar (...)
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  48. Catherine Z. Elgin (ed.) (1997). Nelson Goodman's Philosophy of Art. Garland Pub..
    A challenger of traditions and boundaries A pivotal figure in 20th-century philosophy, Nelson Goodman has made seminal contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, and the philosophy of language, with surprising connections that cut across traditional boundaries. In the early 1950s, Goodman, Quine, and White published a series of papers that threatened to torpedo fundamental assumptions of traditional philosophy. They advocated repudiating analyticity, necessity, and prior assumptions. Some philosophers, realizing the seismic effects repudiation would cause, argued that philosophy should retain the familiar (...)
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  49. Catherine Z. Elgin (ed.) (1997). Nelson Goodman's Theory of Symbols and its Applications. Garland Pub..
    A challenger of traditions and boundaries A pivotal figure in 20th-century philosophy, Nelson Goodman has made seminal contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, and the philosophy of language, with surprising connections that cut across traditional boundaries. In the early 1950s, Goodman, Quine, and White published a series of papers that threatened to torpedo fundamental assumptions of traditional philosophy. They advocated repudiating analyticity, necessity, and prior assumptions. Some philosophers, realizing the seismic effects repudiation would cause, argued that philosophy should retain the (...)
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  50. Catherine Z. Elgin (ed.) (1997). The Philosophy of Nelson Goodman: Selected Essays. Garland Pub..
    v. 1. Nominalism, constructivism, and relativism in the work of Nelson Goodman -- v. 2. Nelson Goodman's new riddle of induction -- v. 3. Nelson Goodman's philosophy of art -- v. 4. Nelson Goodman's theory of symbols and its applications.
     
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