Search results for 'Catherine Molyneux' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Wenzel Geissler & Catherine Molyneux (eds.) (2011). Evidence, Ethos and Experiment: The Anthropology and History of Medical Research in Africa. Berghahn Books.score: 240.0
    "This is an extremely interesting and innovative collection with unusual empirical richness, with ethical and epistemological discussions cutting across ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Maged El Setouhy, Tsiri Agbenyega, Francis Anto, Christine Alexandra Clerk, Kwadwo A. Koram, Michael English, Rashid Juma, Catherine Molyneux, Norbert Peshu & Newton Kumwenda (forthcoming). Moral Standards for Research in Developing Countries From" Reasonable Availability" to" Fair Benefits". Hastings Center Report.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paulina Tindana, Catherine S. Molyneux, Susan Bull & Michael Parker (2014). Ethical Issues in the Export, Storage and Reuse of Human Biological Samples in Biomedical Research: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders in Ghana and Kenya. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):76.score: 240.0
    For many decades, access to human biological samples, such as cells, tissues, organs, blood, and sub-cellular materials such as DNA, for use in biomedical research, has been central in understanding the nature and transmission of diseases across the globe. However, the limitations of current ethical and regulatory frameworks in sub-Saharan Africa to govern the collection, export, storage and reuse of these samples have resulted in inconsistencies in practice and a number of ethical concerns for sample donors, researchers and research ethics (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joshua Earlenbaugh & Bernard Molyneux (2009). Intuitions Are Inclinations to Believe. Philosophical Studies 145 (1):89 - 109.score: 30.0
    Advocates of the use of intuitions in philosophy argue that they are treated as evidence because they are evidential. Their opponents agree that they are treated as evidence, but argue that they should not be so used, since they are the wrong kinds of things. In contrast to both, we argue that, despite appearances, intuitions are not treated as evidence in philosophy whether or not they should be. Our positive account is that intuitions are a subclass of inclinations to believe. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Bernard Molyneux (2009). Why Experience Told Me Nothing About Transparency. Noûs 43 (1):116-136.score: 30.0
    The transparency argument concludes that we're directly aware of external properties and not directly aware of the properties of experience. Focusing on the presentation used by Michael Tye (2002) I contend that the argument requires experience to have content that it cannot plausibly have. I attribute the failure to a faulty account of the transparency phenomenon and conclude by suggesting an alternative understanding that is independently plausible, is not an error-theory and yet renders the transparency of experience compatible with mental-paint (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Bernard Molyneux (2011). On The Infinitely Hard Problem Of Consciousness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):211 - 228.score: 30.0
    I show that the recursive structure of Leibniz's Law requires agents to perform infinitely many operations to psychologically identify the referents of phenomenal and physical concepts, even though the referents of ordinary concepts (e.g. Hesperus and Phosphorus) can be identified in a finite number of steps. The resulting problem resembles the hard problem of consciousness in the fact that it appears (and indeed is) unsolvable by anyone for whom it arises, and in the fact that it invites dualist and eliminativist (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Bernard Molyneux (2010). Why the Neural Correlates of Consciousness Cannot Be Found. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):168-188.score: 30.0
    From the assumption that the presence of consciousness is detectable, in the first instance, only from behavioral indicators, I offer a proof to the effect that, with respect to any theory T that states that some particular state or process is the neural correlate of consciousness, there are always rival neural correlates that, from T’s perspective, can never be empirically ruled out. That's because, with respect to these states, the means of detecting consciousness is disrupted along with the empirical test. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joshua Earlenbaugh & Bernard Molyneux (2009). If Intuitions Must Be Evidential Then Philosophy is in Big Trouble. Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (2):35-53.score: 30.0
    Many philosophers claim that intuitions are evidential. Yet it is hard to see how introspecting one's mental states could provide evidence for such synthetic truths as those concerning, for example, the abstract and the counterfactual. Such considerations have sometimes been taken to lead to mentalism---the view that philosophy must concern itself only with matters of concept application or other mind-dependent topics suited to a contemplative approach---but this provides us with a poor account of what it is that philosophers take themselves (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Bernard Molyneux (2007). Primeness, Internalism and Explanatory Generality. Philosophical Studies 135 (2):255 - 277.score: 30.0
    Williamson (2000) [Knowledge and its Limits, Oxford: Oxford University Press] argues that attempts to substitute narrow mental states or narrow/environmental composites for broad and factive mental states will result in poorer explanations of behavior. I resist Williamson.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. L. U. Catherine (2011). Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. B. Molyneux (2008). Review: Antti Revonsuo: Inner Presence: Consciousness as a Biological Phenomenon. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):210-213.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. V. M. Marsh, D. K. Kamuya, M. J. Parker & C. S. Molyneux (2011). Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research. Public Health Ethics 4 (1):26-39.score: 30.0
    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term ‘community’ and its specific normative contribution. We argue that ‘community’ is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. J. Molyneux (1997). Review. Cultural Poetics in Archaic Greece: Cult, Performance, Politics. C Dougherty, L Kurke\The Poetics of Colonization: From City to Text in Archaic Greece. C Dougherty. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (1):93-96.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Vicki M. Marsh, Dorcas M. Kamuya, Albert M. Mlamba, Thomas N. Williams & Sassy S. Molyneux (2012). Benefits and Payments for Research Participants: Experiences and Views From a Research Centre on the Kenyan Coast. BMC Medical Ethics (1):13-.score: 30.0
    Background: There is general consensus internationally that unfair distribution of the benefits of research is exploitative and should be avoided or reduced. However, what constitutes fair benefits, and the exact nature of the benefits and their mode of provision can be strongly contested. Empirical studies have the potential to contribute viewpoints and experiences to debates and guidelines, but few have been conducted. We conducted a study to support the development of guidelines on benefits and payments for studies conducted by the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. M. Barry & M. Molyneux (1992). Ethical Dilemmas in Malaria Drug and Vaccine Trials: A Bioethical Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (4):189-192.score: 30.0
    Malaria is a disease of developing countries whose local health services do not have the time, resources or personnel to mount studies of drugs or vaccines without the collaboration and technology of western investigators. This investigative collaboration requires a unique bridging of cultural differences with respect to human investigation. The following debate, sponsored by The Institute of Medicine and The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, raises questions concerning the conduct of trans-cultural clinical malaria research. Specific questions are raised (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. J. H. Molyneux (1994). M. L. West, Iambi et Elegi Graeci ante Alexandrum cantati (editio altera aucta atque emendata). Vol. ii: Callinus, Mimnermus, Semonides, Solon, Tyrtaeus, Minora, Adespota. Pp. iv+277. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992. £35.00. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):201-.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. D. Molyneux (2009). Should Healthcare Professionals Respect Autonomy Just Because It Promotes Welfare? Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):245-250.score: 30.0
    Respect for autonomy is an important moral principle within medical ethics. However, the question of whether the normative importance of respect for autonomy is derived from other moral principles (such as welfare) or has independent moral value is debatable. In this paper it is argued that the normative importance of autonomy is derived from both welfare and non-welfare considerations. Welfare considerations provide two types of reason to respect autonomy, one related to the role of autonomy in creating welfare and one (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dorcas Kamuya, Vicki Marsh & Sassy Molyneux (2011). What We Learned About Voluntariness and Consent: Incorporating “Background Situations” and Understanding Into Analyses. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):31-33.score: 30.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 31-33, August 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. J. H. Molyneux (1994). Sympotic Poetry Klaus Fabian, Ezio Pellizer, Gennaro Tedeschi (edd.): ΟΙΝΗΡΑ ΤΕΥΧΗ. Studi Triestini di Poesia Conviviale. (Culture Antiche. Studi e Testi, 3.) Pp. xiv + 304. Alessandria: Edizioni dell' Orso, 1991. Paper, L. 40,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):65-67.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. J. H. Molyneux (1989). Myths in the Hesiodic Catalogue Jennifer R. March: The Creative Poet: Studies on the Treatment of Myths in Greek Poetry. (BICS Supplement, 49.) Pp. Xii + 183; 37 Plates. London: Institute of Classical Studies, 1987. Paper, £25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):180-181.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. J. H. Molyneux (1993). Theognis Franco Ferrari (ed., tr.): Teognide, Elegie. Introduzione, traduzione e note (testo greco a fronte). (I classici della BUR.) Pp. 327; 8 illustrations. Milan: Biblioteca Universale Rizzoli, 1989. Paper, L. 9,500. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (1):9-10.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. L. Welch Catherine, E. Welch Denice & Lisa Hewerdine (2008). Gender and Export Behaviour: Evidence From Women-Owned Enterprises. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1).score: 30.0
    This article draws on the results of a qualitative, exploratory study of 20 Australian women business owners to demonstrate how using a ‹gender as social identity’ lens provides new insights into the influence of gender on exporting and entrepreneurial behaviour. Interview data reveal perceptions of gender identity and gender relations varied and influenced the interpretations which women business owners placed on their exporting activities. Women in the study used different terms to describe exporter and entrepreneurial characteristics to those found in (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. D. Molyneux (2007). "And How is Life Going for You?" an Account of Subjective Welfare in Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):568-582.score: 30.0
  24. John Molyneux (1998). How Not To Write About Lenin. Historical Materialism 3 (1):47-64.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. J. H. Molyneux (1994). David D. Mulroy: Early Greek Lyric Poetry. Translated with an Introduction and Commentary. Pp. Xii + 227; 2 Maps. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992. Cased, £25.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (02):393-394.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. J. H. Molyneux (1994). Sympotic Poetry. The Classical Review 44 (01):65-.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. J. H. Molyneux (1995). Brief Mention. The Classical Review 45 (02):414-.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. H. Molyneux (1995). 'Brief Mention' W. W. Briggs Jr (Ed.): The Selected Classical Papers of Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve. (American Philological Association: American Classical Studies, 30.) Pp. Xxxii+355. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press/American Philological Association, 1992. $59.95 (Paper, $39.95). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (02):414-416.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Sassy Molyneux, Dorcas Kamuya & Vicki Marsh (2010). Community Members Employed on Research Projects Face Crucial, Often Under-Recognized, Ethical Dilemmas. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):24-26.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. J. H. Molyneux (1959). Lucretius 5. 979. Classical Quarterly 9 (3-4):164-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. J. H. Molyneux (1961). Clodius in Hiding? Classical Quarterly 11 (3-4):250-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. J. H. Molyneux (1993). Theognis. The Classical Review 43 (01):9-.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. J. H. Molyneux (1962). Virgil, Aeneid Vi. 160–2. The Classical Review 12 (02):120-121.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. N. Mtunthama, R. Malamba, N. French, M. E. Molyneux, E. E. Zijlstra & S. B. Gordon (2008). Malawians Permit Research Bronchoscopy Due to Perceived Need for Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):303-307.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Campbell (2005). Information-Processing, Phenomenal Consciousness and Molyneux's Question. In José Luis Bermúdez (ed.), Thought, Reference, and Experience: Themes From the Philosophy of Gareth Evans. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 24.0
    Ordinary common sense suggests that we have just one set of shape concepts that we apply indifferently on the bases of sight and touch. Yet we understand the shape concepts, we know what shape properties are, only because we have experience of shapes. And phenomenal experience of shape in vision and phenomenal experience of shape in touch seem to be quite different. So how can the shape concepts we grasp and use on the basis of vision be the same as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Robert Hopkins (2005). Molyneux's Question. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):441-464.score: 24.0
    What philosophical issue or issues does Molyneux’s question raise? I concentrate on two. First, are there any properties represented in both touch and vision? Second, for any such common perceptible, is it represented in the same way in each, so that the two senses support a single concept of that property? I show that there is space for a second issue here, describe its precise relations to Molyneux’s question, and argue for its philosophical significance. I close by arguing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Robert Hopkins (2005). Thomas Reid on Molyneux's Question. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):340-364.score: 24.0
    Reid’s discussion of Molyneux’s question has been neglected. The Inquiry discusses the question twice, offering opposing answers. The first discussion treats the underlying issue as concerning common perceptibles of touch and vision, and in particular whether in vision we originally perceive depth. Although it is tempting to treat the second discussion as doing the same, this would render pointless various novel features Reid introduces in reformulating Molyneux’s question. Rather, the issue now is whether the blind can form a (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alessandra C. Jacomuzzi, Pietro Kobau & Nicola Bruno (2003). Molyneux's Question Redux. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):255-280.score: 24.0
    After more than three centuries, Molyneux's question continues to challenge our understanding of cognition and perceptual systems. Locke, the original recipient of the question, approached it as a theoretical exercise relevant to long-standing philosophical issues, such as nativism, the possibility of common sensibles, and the empiricism-rationalism debate. However, philosophers were quick to adopt the experimentalist's stance as soon as they became aware of recoveries from congenital blindness through ophtalmic surgery. Such recoveries were widely reported to support empiricist positions, suggesting (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Brian Glenney, Molyneux's Question. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Molyneux’s Question, also known as Molyneux’s Problem, soon became a fulcrum for early research in the epistemology of concepts, challenging common intuitions about how our concepts originate, whether sensory features differentiate concepts, and how concepts are utilized in novel contexts. It was reprinted and discussed by a wide range of early modern philosophers, including Gottfried Leibniz, George Berkeley, and Adam Smith, and was perhaps the most important problem in the burgeoning discipline of psychology of the 18th Century. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Kevin Connolly (2013). How to Test Molyneux's Question Empirically. I-Perception 4:508-510.score: 24.0
    Schwenkler (2012) criticizes a 2011 experiment by R. Held and colleagues purporting to answer Molyneux’s question. Schwenkler proposes two ways to re-run the original experiment: either by allowing subjects to move around the stimuli, or by simplifying the stimuli to planar objects rather than three-dimensional ones. In Schwenkler (2013) he expands on and defends the former. I argue that this way of re-running the experiment is flawed, since it relies on a questionable assumption that newly sighted subjects will be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mike Bruno & Eric Mandelbaum (2010). Locke's Answer to Molyneux's Thought Experiment. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (2):165-80.score: 24.0
    Philosophical discussions of Molyneux's problem within contemporary philosophy of mind tend to characterize the problem as primarily concerned with the role innately known principles, amodal spatial concepts, and rational cognitive faculties play in our perceptual lives. Indeed, for broadly similar reasons, rationalists have generally advocated an affirmative answer, while empiricists have generally advocated a negative one, to the question Molyneux posed after presenting his famous thought experiment. This historical characterization of the dialectic, however, somewhat obscures the role (...)'s problem has played in spawning debates within the empiricist tradition. Fortunately, the differences between various empiricist accounts have been widely recognized and discussed among historians of philosophy working on the topic. The focus of the present essay is to develop an interpretation of John Locke's views on Molyneux's problem that best coheres with his other views on human understanding as well as with the predominant scientific opinion about the nature of perception during the period in which he lived. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Brian Glenney (2012). Leibniz on Molyneux's Question. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (3):247-264.score: 24.0
    Might the once-blind recognize shapes familiar to the touch by sight alone? “Not”, replied both Locke and the question’s designer, William Molyneux. Leibniz, by contrast, replied, “yes” to Molyneux’s Question. However, Leibniz’s reason for his affirmative answer has yet to be discussed directly with any depth, a lacuna this paper seeks to address. The main contention of this paper is that Leibniz cannot think that sensory representations based on the sight and touch of shape sufficient for this task, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Brian R. Glenney (2013). Philosophical Problems, Cluster Concepts, and the Many Lives of Molyneux's Question. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):541-558.score: 24.0
    Molyneux’s question, whether the newly sighted might immediately recognize tactilely familiar shapes by sight alone, has produced an array of answers over three centuries of debate and discussion. I propose the first pluralist response: many different answers, both yes and no, are individually sufficient as an answer to the question as a whole. I argue that this is possible if we take the question to be cluster concept of sub-problems. This response opposes traditional answers that isolate specific perceptual features (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.score: 24.0
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on turning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Thomas M. Lennon & D. Anthony Larivière (2000). A correspondência entre Locke e Molyneux. Discurso 31:157-200.score: 24.0
    A correspondência entre J. Locke e W. Molyneux é conhecida principalmente como a fonte da famosa questão relativa ao que pode ser aprendido por um homem cego de nascença e que depois ganha a visão. Curiosamente, a correspondência oferece muito pouco esclarecimento sobre a questão. Outros tópicos importantes, entretanto, são apontados e explorados: entusiasmo pela obra de Malebranche, liberdade e responsabilidade, identidade pessoal, etc. Além disso, a correspondência oferece um conhecimento profundo da recepção histórica do Ensaio de Locke, como (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Laura Berchielli (2002). Color, Space, and Figure in Locke: An Interpretation of the Molyneux Problem. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):47-65.score: 21.0
  47. Judith Jarvis Thomson (1974). Molyneux's Problem. Journal of Philosophy 71 (October):637-650.score: 21.0
  48. Ralph Schumacher (2003). What Are the Direct Objects of Sight? Locke on the Molyneux Question. Locke Studies 3:41-62.score: 21.0
  49. Martha B. Bolton (1994). The Real Molyneux Question and the Basis of Locke's Answer. In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
1 — 50 / 1000