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Profile: Catherine Wilson (University of York, Oxford University)
Profile: Catherine Wilson (University of York)
  1. Catherine Wilson (forthcoming). Darwin and Nietzsche: Selection, Evolution, and Morality. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
  2. Catherine Wilson (forthcoming). Visual Surface and Visual Symbol: The Microscope and the Occult in Early Modern Science. Journal of the History of Ideas.
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  3. Catherine Wilson (2014). Mach, Musil, and Modernism. The Monist 97 (1):138-155.
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  4. Catherine Wilson (2013). Darwin and Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
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  5. Catherine Wilson (2012). Curiosity and Conciliation: A New Leibniz Biography. Modern Intellectual History 9 (2):409-421.
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  6. Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    In this Handbook twenty-six leading scholars survey the development of philosophy between the middle of the sixteenth century and the early eighteenth century.
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  7. Catherine Wilson (2011). Moral Progress Without Moral Realism. Philosophical Papers 39 (1):97-116.
    This paper argues that we can acknowledge the existence of moral truths and moral progress without being committed to moral realism. Rather than defending this claim through the more familiar route of the attempted analysis of the ontological commitments of moral claims, I show how moral belief change for the better shares certain features with theoretical progress in the natural sciences. Proponents of the better theory are able to convince their peers that it is formally and empirically superior to its (...)
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  8. Catherine Wilson (2011). Moral Truth: Observational or Theoretical? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):97-114.
    Moral properties are widely held to be response-dependent properties of actions, situations, events and persons. There is controversy as to whether the putative response-dependence of these properties nullifies any truth-claims for moral judgements, or rather supports them. The present paper argues that moral judgements are more profitably compared with theoretical judgements in the natural sciences than with the judgements of immediate sense-perception. The notion of moral truth is dependent on the notion of moral knowledge, which in turn is best understood (...)
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  9. Catherine Wilson (2011). Realism and Relativism in Ethics. In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oup Oxford.
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  10. Catherine Wilson (2010). Review of David Cunning, Argument and Persuasion in Descartes' Meditations. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).
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  11. Catherine Wilson (2010). The Explanation of Consciousness and the Interpretation of Philosophical Texts. In Peter K. Machamer & Gereon Wolters (eds.), Interpretation: Ways of Thinking About the Sciences and the Arts. University of Pittsburgh Press.
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  12. Catherine Wilson (2009). 15 Epicureanism in Early Modern Philosophy. In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press. 266.
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  13. Catherine Wilson (2009). Epicureanism in the Early Modern Period. In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  14. Catherine Wilson (2009). Review of Daniel Callcut (Ed.), Reading Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10).
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  15. Catherine Wilson (2009). Williams. In Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.), 12 Modern Philosophers. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  16. Catherine Wilson (2008). Disgrace : Bernard Williams and J.M. Coetzee. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub.. 144--162.
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  17. Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  18. Catherine Wilson, Kant and Leibniz. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  19. Catherine Wilson (2008). Review of Alan Thomas (Ed.), Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
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  20. Catherine Wilson (2008). The Enlightenment Philosopher as Social Critic. Intellectual History Review 18 (3):413-425.
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  21. Catherine Wilson (2008). What Do Simple Folks Know? Commentary on the Papers of Adler, Arikha, Martensen, Origgi, and Stoler. Philosophical Forum 39 (3):363-372.
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  22. Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  23. Monte Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Pt. 2. Themes. Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  24. Catherine Wilson (2007). Evolutionary Ethics. In Mohan Matthen & Christopher Stephens (eds.), Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier. 219.
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  25. Catherine Wilson (2007). The Moral Epistemology of Locke's Essay. In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
  26. Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism: Cavendish and Leibniz. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. 35-50.
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  27. Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism. In. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. 35--50.
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  28. Catherine Wilson (2006). Commentary on Galen Strawson. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (s 10-11):177-183.
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  29. Catherine Wilson (2006). Kant and the Speculative Sciences of Origins. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  30. Catherine Wilson (2006). Review of Victoria Kahn, Neil Saccamano, Daniela Coli (Eds.), Politics and the Passions, 1500-1850. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (11).
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  31. Glenn A. Hartz & Catherine Wilson (2005). Ideas and Animals: The Hard Problem of Leibnizian Metaphysics. Studia Leibnitiana 37 (1):1 - 19.
    Die Ansicht, dass Leibniz urn 1700 oder einige Zeit danach ein überzeugter Idealist war oder wurde, der allein an die Realität der Geister und ihrer Ideen glaubte, hält sich merkwürdigerweise in der neueren Sekundärliteratur. In diesem Beitrag beurteilen wir die Textgrundlage für diese Behauptung nach von uns für solide gehaltenen Kriterien einer historischen Interpretation, wobei sich die Behauptung unserer Ansicht nach als unzureichend erweist. Obwohl Leibniz zur Überzeugung gelangt war, dass wirkliche "Atome" der Natur keine Ausdehnung hätten, war er sein (...)
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  32. Catherine Wilson (2005). Claudia Card, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir:The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Ethics 115 (2):389-393.
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  33. Catherine Wilson (2005). 'Compossibility, Expression, Accommodation. In Donald Rutherford J. A. Cover (ed.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. 108--20.
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  34. Catherine Wilson (2005). Is the History of Philosophy Good for Philosophy? In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  35. Catherine Wilson (2005). What is the Importance of Descartes’s Meditation Six? Philosophica 76.
    In this essay, I argu e that Descartes considered his theory that the body is an inn ervated machine – in which the soul is situated – to be his most original contribution to philosophy. His ambition to prove the immortality of the soul was very poorly realized, a predictable outcome, insofar as his aims were ethical, not theological. His dualism accordingly requires reassessment.
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  36. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  37. Catherine Wilson (2004). John Locke, Selected Correspondence Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (6):425-428.
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  38. Catherine Wilson (2004). Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):281 - 298.
  39. Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    In Moral Animals, Catherine Wilson develops a theory of morality based on two fundamental premises: first that moral progress implies the evolution of moral ideals involving restraint and sacrifice; second that human beings are outfitted by nature with selfish motivations, intentions, and ambitions that place constraints on what morality can demand of them. Normative claims, she goes on to show, can be understood as projective hypotheses concerning the conduct of realistically-described nonideal agents in preferred fictional worlds. Such claims differ from (...)
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  40. Catherine Wilson (2004). Report on the 2004 Montreal Nouveaux Essais Conference. The Leibniz Review 14:173-174.
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  41. Catherine Wilson (2004). Simone de Beauvoir and Human Dignity. In Emily R. Grosholz (ed.), The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.
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  42. Catherine Wilson (2004). The Preferences of Women. In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. 99.
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  43. Catherine Wilson (2003). A Humean Argument for Benevolence to Strangers. The Monist 86 (3):454-468.
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  44. Catherine Wilson (2003). Capability and Language in the Novels of Tarjei Vesaas. Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):21-39.
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  45. Catherine Wilson (2003). Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, the book which launched modern philosophy. Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces (...)
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  46. Catherine Wilson (2003). Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (5):325-327.
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  47. Catherine Wilson (2003). Philosopher: A Kind of Life. Philosophy 78 (4):541-552.
    This is an essay review of Ted Honderich's recently published autobiography. Treating the work as both a study of philosophical and political culture in the second half of the twentieth century and as an exercise in self-evaluation, the reviewer discusses the problems of truth and explanation in narrative and the issues of professional and sexual morality raised by the narrative. Honderich's account is assessed as credible, illuminating, and well-written, even as questions are raised concerning the consistency of his political beliefs.
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  48. Catherine Wilson (2003). Philosopher: A Kind of Life By Ted Honderich Routledge: London and New York, 2001. ISBN 0-415-23697-5. Pp. 441+ X. Philosophy 78:541.
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  49. Catherine Wilson (2003). The Role of a Merit Principle in Distributive Justice. Journal of Ethics 7 (3):277-314.
    The claim that the level of well-beingeach enjoys ought to be to some extent afunction of individuals'' talents, efforts,accomplishments, and other meritoriousattributes faces serious challenge from bothegalitarians and libertarians, but also fromskeptics, who point to the poor historicalrecord of attempted merit assays and theubiquity of attribution biases arising fromlimited sweep, misattribution, custom andconvention, and mimicry. Yet merit-principlesare connected with reactive attitudes andinnate expectations, giving them some claim torecognition and there is a widespread beliefthat their use indirectly promotes thewell-being of all. (...)
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  50. Christian Helmut Wenzel, Catherine Wilson, Andrew Levine & David Ingram (2002). Review of Herbert Marcuse, Douglas Kellner Ed., Towards a Critical Theory of Society: The Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse: Volume Two. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
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