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  1. Cathryn Bailey (2009). Anna Julia Cooper, Visionary Black Feminist: A Critical Introduction. By VIVIAN M. MAY. Hypatia 24 (1):185-188.
  2. Cathryn Bailey (2009). A Man and a Dog in a Lifeboat: Self-Sacrifice, Animals, and the Limits of Ethical Theory. Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 129-148.
    In discussions of animal ethics, hypothetical scenarios are often used to try to force the clarification of intuitions about the relative value of human and animal life. Tom Regan requests, for example, that we imagine a man and a dog adrift in a lifeboat while Peter Singer explains why the life of one's child ought to be preferred to that of the family dog in the event of a house fire. I argue that such scenarios are not the usefully abstract (...)
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  3. Cathryn Bailey (2009). Embracing the Icon: The Feminist Potential of the Trans Bodhisattva, Kuan Yin. Hypatia 24 (3):178 - 196.
    I explore how the Buddhist icon Kuan Yin is emerging as a point of identification for trans people and has the potential to resolve a tension within feminism. As a figure that slips past the male/female binary, Kuan Yin explodes the dichotomy between universal and particular in a way that captures the pragmatist and feminist emphasis on doing justice to concrete, particular lives without becoming stuck in an essentialist quagmire.
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  4. Cathryn Bailey (2007). "Africa Begins at the Pyrenees": Moral Outrage, Hypocrisy, and the Spanish Bullfight. Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):23-38.
    : The long history of criticism directed at bullfighting usually suggests that there is something especially morally noxious about it. I analyze the claims that bullfighting is distinctively immoral, comparing it to more widely accepted practices such as the slaughtering of animals for food. I conclude that, while bullfighting is horrific, the emphasis on it as especially "uncivilized" may serve to disguise the similarities that it has with other practices that also depend on animal suffering. I conclude that, for many, (...)
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  5. Cathryn Bailey (2007). We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity. Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    : In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism (or the claim that ethical vegetarianism is morally right for all people) and white racism (the claim that white solipsistic and possibly white privileged ethical claims are imperialistically or insensitively universalized over less privileged human lives). This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification (or solidarity) with animals in ethical vegetarianism. (...)
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  6. Jutta Weber, Marie-Claire Belleau, Sigal Ben-Porath, Cathryn Bailey, Marlene Benjamin, Morwenna Griffiths, Allison Bailey, Birge Krondorfer, Marjorie Miller, Marla Brettschneider & Amy Baehr (2007). Feminist Politics: Identity, Difference, and Agency. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  7. Cathryn Bailey (2005). On the Backs of Animals: The Valorization of Reason in Contemporary Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):1-17.
    : Despite the fact that feminists have compellingly drawn connections between traditional notions of reason and the oppression of women and nature, many animal ethicists fail to deeply incorporate these insights. After detailing the links between reason and the oppression of women and animals, I argue that the work of philosophers such as Tom Regan and Peter Singer fails to reflect that what feminists have called is not the mere inclusion of emotion, but a recognition of the inherent continuity between (...)
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  8. Cathryn Bailey (2004). Anna Julia Cooper: "Dedicated in the Name of My Slave Mother to the Education of Colored Working People". Hypatia 19 (2):56-73.
    : The achievements of Anna Julia Cooper are extraordinary given her life circumstances. Driven by a desire Cooper called "a thumping within," she became a prominent educator, earned her Ph.D., and influenced the thought of W.E.B. DuBois and others. Cooper fought for her educational philosophy, but despite her contributions, her apparent elitism has shaped contemporary assessments of her work. I argue that her views must be considered in social and historical context.
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  9. Cathryn Bailey (1997). Making Waves and Drawing Lines: The Politics of Defining the Vicissitudes of Feminism. Hypatia 12 (3):17-28.
    If there actually is a third wave of feminism, it is too close to the second wave for its definition to be clear and uncontroversial, a fact which emphasizes the political nature of declaring the existence of this third wave. Through an examination of some third wave literature, a case is made for emphasizing the continuity of the second and third waves without blurring the differences between older and younger feminists.
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