Search results for 'Cathy Ball' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. [deleted]Chris Taylor, Dawn Field, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Rolf Apweiler, Michael Ashburner, Cathy Ball, Pierre-Alain Binz, Alvis Brazma, Ryan Brinkman, Eric Deutsch, Oliver Fiehn, Jennifer Fostel, Peter Ghazal, Graeme Brimes, Barry Smith & Others (2008). Promoting Coherent Minimum Reporting Guidelines for Biological and Biomedical Investigations: The MIBBI Project. Nature Biotechnology 26:889-896.score: 240.0
    To promote the useability of scientific data deriving from a range of experimental methods, minimal information checklists have been created for a range of assay types, which specify the minimum information which must be provided about a given application of an experimental method in order to ensure that the data is understandable by external users. The Minimum Information for Biological and Biomedical Investigations (MIBBI) project aims to foster the coordinated development of minimum-information checklists and provide a resource for those exploring (...)
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  2. Terence Ball (1995). Reappraising Political Theory: Revisionist Studies in the History of Political Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this lively and entertaining book, Terence Ball maintains that 'classic' works in political theory continue to speak to us only if they are periodically re-read and reinterpreted from alternative perspectives. That, the author contends, is how these works became classics, and why they are regarded as such. Ball suggests a way of reading that is both 'pluralist' and 'problem-driven'--pluralist in that there is no one right way to read a text, and problem-driven in that the reinterpretation is (...)
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  3. Philip Ball (2010). The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Now in The Music Instinct , award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how ...
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  4. Stephen J. Ball (ed.) (1990). Foucault and Education: Disciplines and Knowledge. Routledge.score: 60.0
    1 Introducing Monsieur Foucault Stephen J. Ball Michel Foucault is an enigma, a massively influential intellectual who steadfastly refused to align himself ...
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  5. Derek Ball (2013). Consciousness and Conceptual Mastery. Mind 122 (486):fzt075.score: 60.0
    Torin Alter (2013) attempts to rescue phenomenal concepts and the knowledge argument from the critique of Ball 2009 by appealing to conceptual mastery. I show that Alter’s appeal fails, and describe general features of conceptual mastery that suggest that no such appeal could succeed.
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  6. Stephen J. Ball (2012). Foucault, Power, and Education. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Foucault, Power, and Education invites internationally renowned scholar Stephen J. Ball to reflect on the importance and influence of Foucault on his work in educational policy.
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  7. Philip Ball (2011). Shapes: Nature's Patterns: A Tapestry in Three Parts. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Philip Ball explores the science of the shapes we see in nature, revealing how, from the stripes of a zebra to the development of a snowflake or even a human embryo, there is a pattern-forming tendency in the basic processes of nature, and from a few simple themes, and the repetition of simple rules, endless beautiful variations can arise.
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  8. Derek Ball (2009). There Are No Phenomenal Concepts. Mind 118 (472):935-962.score: 30.0
    It has long been widely agreed that some concepts can be possessed only by those who have undergone a certain type of phenomenal experience. Orthodoxy among contemporary philosophers of mind has it that these phenomenal concepts provide the key to understanding many disputes between physicalists and their opponents, and in particular offer an explanation of Mary’s predicament in the situation exploited by Frank Jackson's knowledge argument. I reject the orthodox view; I deny that there are phenomenal concepts. My arguments exploit (...)
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  9. Brian Ball & Michael Blome-Tillmann (201). Counter Closure and Knowledge Despite Falsehood. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (257):552-568.score: 30.0
    Certain puzzling cases have been discussed in the literature recently which appear to support the thought that knowledge can be obtained by way of deduction from a falsehood; moreover, these cases put pressure, prima facie, on the thesis of counter closure for knowledge. We argue that the cases do not involve knowledge from falsehood; despite appearances, the false beliefs in the cases in question are causally, and therefore epistemologically, incidental, and knowledge is achieved despite falsehood. We also show that the (...)
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  10. Derek Ball (2007). Twin-Earth Externalism and Concept Possession. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):457-472.score: 30.0
    It is widely believed that Twin-Earth-style thought experiments show that the contents of a person's thoughts fail to supervene on her intrinsic properties. Several recent philosophers have made the further claim that Twin-Earth-style thought experiments produce metaphysically necessary conditions for the possession of certain concepts. I argue that the latter view is false, and produce counterexamples to several proposed conditions. My thesis is of particular interest because it undermines some attempts to show that externalism is incompatible with privileged access.
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  11. Derek Ball (2011). Property Identities and Modal Arguments. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (13).score: 30.0
    Physicalists about the mind are committed to claims about property identities. Following Kripke's well-known discussion, modal arguments have emerged as major threats to such claims. This paper argues that modal arguments can be resisted by adopting a counterpart theoretic account of modal claims, and in particular modal claims involving properties. Thus physicalists have a powerful motive to adopt non-Kripkean accounts of the metaphysics of modality and the semantics of modal expressions.
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  12. Terence Ball (1984). The Picaresque Prince: Reflections on Machiavelli and Moral Change. Political Theory 12 (4):521-536.score: 30.0
  13. Derek Ball & Bryan Pickel (2013). One Dogma of Millianism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):70-92.score: 30.0
    Millians about proper names typically claim that it is knowable apriori that Hesperus is Phosphorus. We argue that they should claim instead that it is knowable only aposteriori that Hesperus is Hesperus, since the Kripke-Putnam epistemic arguments against descriptivism are special cases of Quinean arguments that nothing is knowable apriori, and Millians have no resources to resist the more general Quinean arguments.
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  14. Brian Ball & Michael Blome-Tillmann (2013). Indexical Reliabilism and the New Evil Demon. Erkenntnis 78 (6):1317-1336.score: 30.0
    Stewart Cohen’s New Evil Demon argument raises familiar and widely discussed concerns for reliabilist accounts of epistemic justification. A now standard response to this argument, initiated by Alvin Goldman and Ernest Sosa, involves distinguishing different notions of justification. Juan Comesaña has recently and prominently claimed that his Indexical Reliabilism (IR) offers a novel solution in this tradition. We argue, however, that Comesaña’s proposal suffers serious difficulties from the perspective of the philosophy of language. More specifically, we show that the two (...)
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  15. Terence Ball (2007). Political Theory and Political Science: Can This Marriage Be Saved? Theoria 54 (113):1-22.score: 30.0
    The too-often unhappy 'marriage' of political theory and political science has long been a source of anguish for both partners. Should this troubled partnership be dissolved? Or might this marriage yet be saved? Ball answers the former question negatively and the latter affirmatively. Playing the part of therapist instead of theorist, he selectively recounts a number of episodes which estranged the partners and strained the marriage. And yet, he concludes that the conflicts were in hindsight more constructive than destructive, (...)
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  16. Stephen W. Ball (1985). Bergmann's Theory of Freedom. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (3):287-304.score: 30.0
  17. Stephen W. Ball (1988). Evolution, Explanation, and the Fact/Value Distinction. Biology and Philosophy 3 (3):317-348.score: 30.0
    Though modern non-cognitivists in ethics characteristically believe that values are irreducible to facts, they nevertheless believe that values are determined by facts, viz., those specified in functionalist, explanatory theories of the evolutionary origin of morality. The present paper probes the consistency of this position. The conventionalist theories of Hume and Harman are examined, and are seen not to establish a tight determinative reduction of values to facts. This result is illustrated by reference to recent theories of the sociobiological mechanisms involved (...)
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  18. Stephen W. Ball (1979). Hegel on Proving the Existence of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10 (2):73 - 100.score: 30.0
  19. Stephen W. Ball (1988). Reductionism in Ethics and Science: A Contemporary Look at G. E. Moore's Open-Question Argument. American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (3):197 - 213.score: 30.0
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  20. Stephen W. Ball (1991). Linguistic Intuitions and Varieties of Ethical Naturalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (1):1-38.score: 30.0
  21. Kirstie S. Ball (2001). Situating Workplace Surveillance: Ethics and Computer Based Performance Monitoring. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):209-221.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the study of computer basedperformance monitoring (CBPM) in the workplaceas an issue dominated by questions of ethics.Its central contention paper is that anyinvestigation of ethical monitoring practice isinadequate if it simply applies best practiceguidelines to any one context to indicate,whether practice is, on balance, ethical or not. The broader social dynamics of access toprocedural and distributive justice examinedthrough a fine grained approach to the study ofworkplace social relations, and workplaceidentity construction, are also important here. This has three (...)
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  22. Stephen J. Ball (1998). Intellectuals or Technicians? The Urgent Role of Theory in Educational Studies. British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (3):255 - 271.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses some problems with the field of educational studies and considers the role of post-structuralist theory in shifting the study of education away from a 'technical rationalist' approach (as evidenced in the case of much research on educational management and school effectiveness) towards an 'intellectual intelligence' stance that stresses contingency, disidentification and risk-taking.
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  23. B. Ball (2013). Knowledge is Normal Belief. Analysis 73 (1):69-76.score: 30.0
    In this article, I offer a new analysis of knowledge: knowledge, I claim, is normal belief. I begin with what I take to be the conceptual truth that knowledge is epistemically justified, or permissible, belief. I then argue that this in turn is simply doxastically normal belief, first clarifying what is meant by this claim, and then providing reasons to think that normal belief, so understood, must be true and safe from error, making it a good candidate for knowledge.
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  24. W. Macmahon Ball (1931). The Limits of Political Obligation. International Journal of Ethics 41 (3):296-304.score: 30.0
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  25. Philip Ball (2010). Making Life: A Comment on 'Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life' by Henk van den Belt (2009). NanoEthics 4 (2):129-132.score: 30.0
    Van den Belt recently examined the notion that synthetic biology and the creation of ‘artificial’ organisms are examples of scientists ‘playing God’. Here I respond to some of the issues he raises, including some of his comments on my previous discussions of the value of the term ‘life’ as a scientific concept.
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  26. W. Macmahon Ball (1932). The Basis of Political Obedience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):173 – 187.score: 30.0
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  27. Stephen W. Ball (1984). Bibliographical Essay / Legal Positivism, Natural Law, and the Hart/Dworkin Debate. Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (2):68-85.score: 30.0
  28. Derek Ball (2013). Two-Dimensionalism and the Social Character of Meaning. Erkenntnis:1-29.score: 30.0
    This paper develops and critiques the two-dimensionalist account of mental content developed by David Chalmers. I first explain Chalmers’s account and show that it resists some popular criticisms. I then argue that the main interest of two-dimensionalism lies in its accounts of cognitive significance and of the connection between conceivability and possibility. These accounts hinge on the claim that some thoughts have a primary intension that is necessarily true. In this respect, they are Carnapian, and subject to broadly Quinean attack. (...)
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  29. Richard Bowe, Stephen Ball & Sharon Gewirtz (1994). 'Parental Choice', Consumption and Social Theory: The Operation of Micro-Markets in Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (1):38 - 52.score: 30.0
    Using key writings in the sociology of consumption and consumerism and analyses of the nature of postmodern society, this paper considers how parents decide upon a secondary school and the nature of their engagement with the education market.
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  30. Meredith R. Wilkinson & Linden J. Ball (2012). Why Studies of Autism Spectrum Disorders Have Failed to Resolve the Theory Theory Versus Simulation Theory Debate. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (2):263-291.score: 30.0
    The Theory Theory (TT) versus Simulation Theory (ST) debate is primarily concerned with how we understand others’ mental states. Theory theorists claim we do this using rules that are akin to theoretical laws, whereas simulation theorists claim we use our own minds to imagine ourselves in another’s position. Theorists from both camps suggest a consideration of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can help resolve the TT/ST debate (e.g., Baron-Cohen 1995; Carruthers 1996a; Goldman 2006). We present a three-part argument that (...)
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  31. Stephen W. Ball (1989). Facts, Values, and Normative Supervenience. Philosophical Studies 55 (2):143 - 172.score: 30.0
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  32. Stephen W. Ball (2005). Carl Cohen and James P. Sterba, Affirmative Action and Racial Preference: A Debate:Affirmative Action and Racial Preference: A Debate. Ethics 116 (1):226-228.score: 30.0
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  33. Stephen W. Ball (1986). Economic Equality: Rawls Versus Utilitarianism. Economics and Philosophy 2 (02):225-.score: 30.0
    Perhaps the most salient feature of Rawls's theory of justice which at once attracts supporters and repels critics is its apparent egalitarian conclusion as to how economic goods are to be distributed. Indeed, many of Rawls's sympathizers may find this result intuitively appealing, and regard it as Rawls's enduring contribution to the topic of economic justice, despite technical deficiencies in Rawls's contractarian, decision-theoretic argument for it which occupy the bulk of the critical literature. Rawls himself, having proposed a “coherence” theory (...)
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  34. Terence Ball (1985). The Incoherence of Intergenerational Justice. Inquiry 28 (1-4):321 – 337.score: 30.0
    Contemporary theories of justice fail to recognize that the concepts constitutive of our political practices ? including ?justice? itself? have historically mutable meanings. To recognize the fact of conceptual change entails an alteration in our understanding of justice between generations. Because there can be no transhistorical theory of justice, there can be no valid theory of intergenerational justice either ? especially where the generations in question are distant ones having very different understandings of justice. The upshot is that an earlier (...)
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  35. Stephen W. Ball (1995). Gibbard's Evolutionary Theory of Rationality and its Ethical Implications. Biology and Philosophy 10 (2):129-180.score: 30.0
    Gibbard''s theory of rationality is evolutionary in terms of its result as well as its underpinning argument. The result is that judgments about what is rational are analyzed as being similar to judgments of morality — in view of what Darwin suggests concerning the latter. According to the Darwinian theory, moral judgments are based on sentiments which evolve to promote the survival and welfare of human societies. On Gibbard''s theory, rationality judgments should be similarly regarded as expressing emotional attachments to (...)
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  36. Terence Ball (1979). Marx and Darwin: A Reconsideration. Political Theory 7 (4):469 - 483.score: 30.0
  37. Derek Ball (2014). Indexicality, Transparency, and Mental Files. Inquiry 58 (4):353-367.score: 30.0
    Francois Recanati’s Mental Files presents a picture of the mind on which mental representations are indexical and transparent. I dispute this picture: there is no clear case for regarding mental representations as indexical, and there are counterexamples to transparency.
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  38. Brian Ball (2014). Speech Acts: Natural or Normative Kinds? The Case of Assertion. Mind and Language 29 (3):336-350.score: 30.0
    There are two views of the essences of speech acts: according to one view, they are natural kinds; according to the other, they are what I call normative kinds—kinds in the (possibly non-reductive) definition of which some normative term occurs. In this article I show that speech acts can be normative but also natural kinds by deriving Williamson's account of assertion, on which it is an act individuated, and constitutively governed, by a norm (the knowledge rule), from a consideration of (...)
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  39. H. N., W. McD, Sidney Ball, W. D. Morrison, J. S. Mackenzie, J. Shawcross, B. C. & B. W. (1902). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 11 (43):402-417.score: 30.0
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  40. Philip Ball (2011). Unnatural: The Heretical Idea of Making People. Bodley Head.score: 30.0
    From the legendary inventor Daedalus to Goethe's tragic Faust, from the automata-making magicians of E.T.A Hoffmann to Mary Shelley's Victor Frankenstein – ...
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  41. Stephen W. Ball (1993). Maximin Justice, Sacrifice, and the Reciprocity Argument: A Pragmatic Reassessment of the Rawls/Nozick Debate. Utilitas 5 (02):157-.score: 30.0
    Theories of economic justice are characteristically based on abstract ethical concerns often unrelated to practical distributive results. Two decades ago, Rawls's theory of justice began as a reaction against the alleged ‘sacrifices’ condoned by utilitarian theory. One variant of this objection is that utilitarianism permits gross inequalities, severe deprivations of individual liberty, or even the enslavement of society's least well-off individuals. There are, however, more subtle forms of the objection. In Rawls, it is often waged without any claim that utilitarianism (...)
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  42. Stephen J. Ball (1993). Education Policy, Power Relations and Teachers' Work. British Journal of Educational Studies 41 (2):106 - 121.score: 30.0
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  43. Terence Ball & Terrell Carver (1982). On Warren's Response to "Marx and Darwin: A Reconsideration". Political Theory 10 (2):307-314.score: 30.0
  44. R. R. Marett, Sidney Ball, C. C. J. Webb, Herbert W. Blunt, F. C. S. Schiller, Frank Granger, M. L., F. N. Hales & C. A. F. Rhys Davids (1902). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 11 (42):254-270.score: 30.0
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  45. Terence Ball (1972). On 'Historical' Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2 (1):181-192.score: 30.0
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  46. Stephen W. Ball (1998). Critical Review of Rawls's Political Liberalism: A Utilitarian and Decision-Theoretical Analysis of the Main Arguments. Utilitas 10 (02):222-.score: 30.0
  47. Stephen W. Ball (2003). Robert Audi, The Architecture of Reason: The Structure and Substance of Rationality, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001, Pp. Vii + 286. Utilitas 15 (01):109-.score: 30.0
  48. Brian Ball (forthcoming). Deriving the Norm of Assertion in Advance. Journal of Philosophical Research.score: 30.0
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  49. Stephen W. Ball (1992). Morality Among Nations: An Evolutionary View. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):361-377.score: 30.0
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  50. Kelly H. Ball (2013). "More or Less Raped": Foucault, Causality, and Feminist Critiques of Sexual Violence. Philosophia 3 (1):14.score: 30.0
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