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  1. Cathy Charles, Amiram Gafni & Emily Freeman (2011). The Evidence‐Based Medicine Model of Clinical Practice: Scientific Teaching or Belief‐Based Preaching? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):597-605.
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  2. Roberto Abadie, Audrey J. Weymiller, Jon Tilburt, Nilay D. Shah, Cathy Charles, Amiram Gafni & Victor M. Montori (2009). Clinician's Use of the Statin Choice Decision Aid in Patients with Diabetes: A Videographic Study Nested in a Randomized Trial. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (3):492-497.
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  3. Donald J. Willison, Valerie Steeves, Cathy Charles, Lisa Schwartz, Jennifer Ranford, Gina Agarwal, Ji Cheng & Lehana Thabane (2009). Consent for Use of Personal Information for Health Research: Do People with Potentially Stigmatizing Health Conditions and the General Public Differ in Their Opinions? BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):10-.
    BackgroundStigma refers to a distinguishing personal trait that is perceived as or actually is physically, socially, or psychologically disadvantageous. Little is known about the opinion of those who have more or less stigmatizing health conditions regarding the need for consent for use of their personal information for health research.MethodsWe surveyed the opinions of people 18 years and older with seven health conditions. Participants were drawn from: physicians' offices and clinics in southern Ontario; and from a cross-Canada marketing panel of individuals (...)
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  4. Donald J. Willison, Marilyn Swinton, Lisa Schwartz, Julia Abelson, Cathy Charles, David Northrup, Ji Cheng & Lehana Thabane (2008). Alternatives to Project-Specific Consent for Access to Personal Information for Health Research: Insights From a Public Dialogue. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):18-.
    BackgroundThe role of consent for research use of health information is contentious. Most discussion has focused on when project-specific consent may be waived but, recently, a broader range of consent options has been entertained, including broad opt-in for multiple studies with restrictions and notification with opt-out. We sought to elicit public values in this matter and to work toward an agreement about a common approach to consent for use of personal information for health research through deliberative public dialogues.MethodsWe conducted seven (...)
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