Search results for 'Causation History' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  56
    Andreea Mihali (forthcoming). EFFICIENT CAUSATION – A HISTORY. Edited by Tad M. Schmaltz. Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford New York: Oxford University Press. [REVIEW] American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    A new series entitled Oxford Philosophical Concepts (OPC) made its debut in November 2014. As the series’ Editor Christia Mercer notes, this series is an attempt to respond to the call for and the tendency of many philosophers to invigorate the discipline. To that end each volume will rethink a central concept in the history of philosophy, e.g. efficient causation, health, evil, eternity, etc. “Each OPC volume is a history of its concept in that it tells a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  8
    Morris Raphael Cohen (1942). Causation and its Application to History. [N. P..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Indu Banga (ed.) (1992). Causation in History. Manohar Publications.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    Antonia Lolordo (2015). Tad M. Schmaltz, Ed.Efficient Causation: A History. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. 392. £64.00 ; £22.99. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (2):356-360.
    This is a review of Tad Schmaltz, Efficient Causation: A History.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. John Collins, Ned Hall & L. A. Paul (2004). Counterfactuals and Causation: History, Problems, and Prospects. In John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. The MIT Press 1--57.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6.  1
    Andrea Falcon (2015). Efficient Causation: A History Ed. By Tad M. Schmaltz. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (3):541-542.
    This volume is a history of the concept of efficient causation in three parts. The natural starting point of this history is Aristotle, who claims to be the first to introduce the concept of the efficient cause. According to Aristotle, his predecessors had at most a confused and inadequate notion of this cause. By contrast, he has a theory of the four causes, and his treatment of the efficient cause is a part of that theory. Note, however, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Tad M. Schmaltz (ed.) (2014). Efficient Causation: A History. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Causation is now commonly supposed to involve a succession that instantiates some law-like regularity. Efficient Causation: A History examines how our modern notion developed from a very different understanding of efficient causation. This volume begins with Aristotle's initial conception of efficient causation, and then considers the transformations and reconsiderations of this conception in late antiquity, medieval and modern philosophy, ending with contemporary accounts of causation. It includes four short "Reflections" that explore the significance of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  1
    Robert S. Cohen (1970). Causation in History. In Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.), Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press 231--251.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. F. M. Barnard (1963). Herder's Treatment of Causation and Continuity in History. Journal of the History of Ideas 24 (2):197.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Morris R. Cohen (1942). Causation and its Application to History. Journal of the History of Ideas 3 (1):12.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Tad M. Schmaltz (ed.) (2014). Efficient Causation: A History. OUP Usa.
    This volume is a collection of new essays by specialists that trace the concept of efficient causation from its discovery in Ancient Greece, through its development in late antiquity, the medieval period, and modern philosophy, to its use in contemporary metaphysics and philosophy of science.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  19
    E. J. Tapp (1952). Some Aspects of Causation in History. Journal of Philosophy 49 (3):67-79.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  14
    Mendel F. Cohen (1987). Causation in History. Philosophy 62 (241):341 - 360.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  13
    Lawrence K. Frank (1934). Causation: An Episode in the History of Thought. Journal of Philosophy 31 (16):421-428.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Mendel F. Cohen (1987). Causation in History: Mendel F. Cohen. Philosophy 62 (241):341-360.
    Following the practice of human beings everywhere historians distinguish the real or most significant cause of an occurrence or state of affairs from ‘less important considerations’, ‘precipitating circumstances’, or ‘mere conditions’. I shall term claims that some phenomenon is most basically to be attributed to some one of the factors causally necessary for its occurrence attributive causal explanations or causal attributions and discuss here the extent to which moral convictions are constitutive of them.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Andreea Mihali (2016). Efficient Causation: A History. Edited by Tad M. Schmaltz. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):163-167.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Galen Strawson (1989). The Secret Connexion: Causation, Realism, and David Hume. Oxford University Press.
    It is widely supposed that David Hume invented and espoused the "regularity" theory of causation, holding that causal relations are nothing but a matter of one type of thing being regularly followed by another. It is also widely supposed that he was not only right about this, but that it was one of his greatest contributions to philosophy. Strawson here argues that the regularity theory of causation is indefensible, and that Hume never adopted it in any case. Strawson (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  18.  95
    Keith Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.) (2010). Causation and Modern Philosophy. Routledge.
    A collection of new essays on causation in the period from Galileo to Lady Mary Shepherd (roughly 1600-1850). Contributors: David Wootton, Tad Schmaltz, William Eaton and Robert Higgerson, Eric Schliesser, Pauline Phemister, Timothy Stanton, Peter Millican, Constantine Sandis, Boris Hennig, Angela Breitenbach, Stathis Psillos, and Martha Brandt Bolton.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  49
    Carl Hammer (2008). Explication, Explanation, and History. History and Theory 47 (2):183–199.
    To date, no satisfactory account of the connection between natural-scientific and historical explanation has been given, and philosophers seem to have largely given up on the problem. This paper is an attempt to resolve this old issue and to sort out and clarify some areas of historical explanation by developing and applying a method that will be called “pragmatic explication” involving the construction of definitions that are justified on pragmatic grounds. Explanations in general can be divided into “dynamic” and “static” (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Raghwendra Pratap Singh (2000). Freedom and Causation: With Special Reference to Hegel's Overcoming of Kant. Om Publications.
  21.  36
    Daniel Nolan (forthcoming). The Possibilities of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History.
  22.  48
    R. J. Hankinson (1998). Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought. Oxford University Press.
    R. J. Hankinson traces the history of ancient Greek thinking about causation and explanation, from its earliest beginnings through more than a thousand years to the middle of the first millennium of the Christian era. He examines ways in which the Ancient Greeks dealt with questions about how and why things happen as and when they do, about the basic constitution and structure of things, about function and purpose, laws of nature, chance, coincidence, and responsibility.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  23.  25
    Richard Scheines (2002). Computation and Causation. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Metaphilosophy. Blackwell Pub. 158-180.
    In 1982, when computers were just becoming widely available, I was a graduate student beginning my work with Clark Glymour on a PhD thesis entitled: “Causality in the Social Sciences.” Dazed and confused by the vast philosophical literature on causation, I found relative solace in the clarity of Structural Equation Models (SEMs), a form of statistical model used commonly by practicing sociologists, political scientists, etc., to model causal hypotheses with which associations among measured variables might be explained. The statistical (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Maurice Mandelbaum (1942). Causal Analysis in History. [N. P..
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Frederick John Teggart (1942). Causation in Historical Events. [N. P..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  69
    Kevin Falvey (1999). A Natural History of Belief. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):324-345.
    Contemporary philosophy of mind is dominated by a conception of our propositional attitude concepts as comprising a proto-scientific causal-explanatory theory of behavior. This conception has given rise to a spate of recent worries about the prospects for “naturalizing” the theory. In this paper I return to the roots of the “theory-theory” of the attitudes in Wilfrid Sellars’s classic “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind.” I present an alternative to the theory-theory’s account of belief in the form of a parody of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    Aviezer Tucker (2010). Where Do We Go From Here? Jubilee Report on History and Theory. History and Theory 49 (4):64-84.
    Progress in understanding, clarifying, forming, and devising methods for analyzing, eliminating, or resolving the problems of the philosophies of history and historiography requires integration with other branches of philosophy such as metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of science, the philosophy of mind, and ethics. Conversely, mainstream philosophical theories would benefit from confronting the problems of the philosophies of history and historiography. Solving the problems of the philosophies of historiography and history requires considering historiography as continuous with philosophy.This approach (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Max Kistler (2007). Causation and Laws of Nature. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge
    Causation is important. It is, as Hume said, the cement of the universe, and lies at the heart of our conceptual structure. Causation is one of the most fundamental tools we have for organizing our apprehension of the external world and ourselves. But philosophers' disagreement about the correct interpretation of causation is as limitless as their agreement about its importance. The history of attempts to elucidate the nature of this concept and to situate it with respect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  29. David Robb (1997). The Properties of Mental Causation. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (187):178-94.
    Recent discussions of mental causation have focused on three principles: (1) Mental properties are (sometimes) causally relevant to physical effects; (2) mental properties are not physical properties; (3) every physical event has in its causal history only physical events and physical properties. Since these principles seem to be inconsistent, solutions have focused on rejecting one or more of them. But I argue that, in spite of appearances, (1)–(3) are not inconsistent. The reason is that 'properties' is used in (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  30.  87
    Brendan Clarke (2011). Causation and Melanoma Classification. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):19-32.
    In this article, I begin by giving a brief history of melanoma causation. I then discuss the current manner in which malignant melanoma is classified. In general, these systems of classification do not take account of the manner of tumour causation. Instead, they are based on phenomenological features of the tumour, such as size, spread, and morphology. I go on to suggest that misclassification of melanoma is a major problem in clinical practice. I therefore outline an alternative (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  73
    Robert Northcott (2008). Weighted Explanations in History. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):76-96.
    , whereby some causes are deemed more important than others, are ubiquitous in historical studies. Drawing from influential recent work on causation, I develop a definition of causal-explanatory strength. This makes clear exactly which aspects of explanatory weighting are subjective and which objective. It also sheds new light on several traditional issues, showing for instance that: underlying causes need not be more important than proximate ones; several different causes can each be responsible for most of an effect; small causes (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  21
    Daniel Kodaj (2015). Intrinsic Causation in Humean Supervenience. Ratio 28 (2):135-152.
    The paper investigates whether causation is extrinsic in Humean Supervenience in the sense that being caused by is an intrinsic relation between token causes and effects. The underlying goal is to test whether causality is extrinsic for Humeans and intrinsic for anti-Humeans in this sense. I argue that causation is typically extrinsic in HS, but it is intrinsic to event pairs that collectively exhaust almost the whole of history.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  64
    Robert C. Koons (1998). Teleology as Higher-Order Causation: A Situation-Theoretic Account. Minds and Machines 8 (4):559-585.
    Situation theory, as developed by Barwise and his collaborators, is used to demonstrate the possibility of defining teleology (and related notions, like that of proper or biological function) in terms of higher order causation, along the lines suggested by Taylor and Wright. This definition avoids the excessive narrowness that results from trying to define teleology in terms of evolutionary history or the effects of natural selection. By legitimating the concept of teleology, this definition also provides promising new avenues (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  33
    C. Behan McCullagh (1998). The Truth of History. Routledge.
    The Truth of History questions how modern historians, confined by the concepts of their own cultures, can still discover truths about the past. Through an examination of the constraints of history, accounts of causation and causal interpretations, C. Behan McCullagh argues that although historical descriptions do not mirror the past, they can correlate with it in a regular and definable way. Far from debating only in the abstract and philosophical, the author constructs his argument in numerous concrete (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  8
    Douglas Kutach (2014). Causation. Polity.
    In most academic and non-academic circles throughout history, the world and its operation have been viewed in terms of cause and effect. The principles of causation have been applied, fruitfully, across the sciences, law, medicine, and in everyday life, despite the lack of any agreed-upon framework for understanding what causation ultimately amounts to. In this engaging and accessible introduction to the topic, Douglas Kutach explains and analyses the most prominent theories and examples in the philosophy of (...). The book is organized so as to respect the various cross-cutting and interdisciplinary concerns about causation, such as the reducibility of causation, its application to scientific modeling, its connection to influence and laws of nature, and its role in causal explanation. Kutach begins by presenting the four recurring distinctions in the literature on causation, proceeding through an exploration of various accounts of causation including determination, difference making and probability-raising. He concludes by carefully considering their application to the mind-body problem. _Causation_ provides a straightforward and compact survey of contemporary approaches to causation and serves as a friendly and clear guide for anyone interested in exploring the complex jungle of ideas that surround this fundamental philosophical topic. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  83
    Karen R. Zwier (2014). Interventionist Causation in Physical Science. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The current consensus view of causation in physics, as commonly held by scientists and philosophers, has several serious problems. It fails to provide an epistemology for the causal knowledge that it claims physics to possess; it is inapplicable in a prominent area of physics (classical thermodynamics); and it is difficult to reconcile with our everyday use of causal concepts and claims. In this dissertation, I use historical examples and philosophical arguments to show that the interventionist account of causation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  41
    Derk Pereboom (2000). Alternative Possibilities and Causal Histories. Philosopical Perspectives 14 (s14):119-138.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  38.  37
    Geert Keil (2007). Making Something Happen. Where Causation and Agency Meet. In Francesca Castellani & Josef Quitterer (eds.), Agency and Causation in the Human Sciences. Mentis 19-35.
    1. Introduction: a look back at the reasons vs. causes debate. 2. The interventionist account of causation. 3. Four objections to interventionism. 4. The counterfactual analysis of event causation. 5. The role of free agency. 6. Causality in the human sciences. -- The reasons vs. causes debate reached its peak about 40 years ago. Hempel and Dray had debated the nature of historical explanation and the broader issue of whether explanations that cite an agent’s reasons are causal or (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  60
    Thomas Junker (1996). Factors Shaping Ernst Mayr's Concepts in the History of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):29 - 77.
    As frequently pointed out in this discussion, one of the most characteristic features of Mayr's approach to the history of biology stems from the fact that he is dealing to a considerable degree with his own professional history. Furthermore, his main criterion for the selection of historical episodes is their relevance for modern biological theory. As W. F. Bynum and others have noted, the general impression of his reviewers is that “one of the towering figures of evolutionary biology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40.  17
    Eric Watkins (ed.) (2009). Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Background Source Materials. Cambridge University Press.
    Provides English translations of texts that form the essential background to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  48
    P. Kyle Stanford (2002). The Manifest Connection: Causation, Meaning, and David Hume. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):339-360.
    P. Kyle Stanford - The Manifest Connection: Causation, Meaning, and David Hume - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.3 339-360 The Manifest Connection: Causation, Meaning, and David Hume P. Kyle Stanford 1. Introduction exciting recent hume scholarship has challenged the traditional view that Hume's theory of meaning leads him to deny the very intelligibility or coherence of supposing that there are objective causal powers or intrinsic necessary connections between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42.  69
    Tim De Mey & Erik Weber (2003). Explanation and Thought Experiments in History. History and Theory 42 (1):28–38.
    Although interest in them is clearly growing, most professional historians do not accept thought experiments as appropriate tools. Advocates of the deliberate use of thought experiments in history argue that without counterfactuals, causal attributions in history do not make sense. Whereas such arguments play upon the meaning of causation in history, this article focuses on the reasoning processes by which historians arrive at causal explanations. First, we discuss the roles thought experiments play in arriving at explanations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  2
    Tim De Mey & Erik Weber (2003). Explanation And Thought Experiments In History. History and Theory 42 (1):28-38.
    Although interest in them is clearly growing, most professional historians do not accept thought experiments as appropriate tools. Advocates of the deliberate use of thought experiments in history argue that without counterfactuals, causal attributions in history do not make sense. Whereas such arguments play upon the meaning of causation in history, this article focuses on the reasoning processes by which historians arrive at causal explanations. First, we discuss the roles thought experiments play in arriving at explanations (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  5
    Robert Guralnick (2002). A Recapitulation of the Rise and Fall of the Cell Lineage Research Program: The Evolutionary-Developmental Relationship of Cleavage to Homology, Body Plans and Life History. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):537 - 567.
    American biologists in the late nineteenth century pioneered the descriptive-comparative study of all cell divisions from zygote to gastrulation -- the cell lineage. Data from cell lineages were crucial to evolutionary and developmental questions of the day. One of the main questions was the ultimate causation of developmental patterns -- historical or mechanical. E. B. Wilson's groundbreaking lineage work on the polychaete worm Nereis in 1892 set the stage for (1) an attack on Haeckel's phylogenetic-historical notion of recapitulation and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  14
    J. A. van Ruler (1995). The Crisis of Causality: Voetius and Descartes on God, Nature, and Change. E.J. Brill.
    This study on the reception of Cartesianism is the result of a four-year fellowship as assistant-in-training at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Groningen. Zie: Preface.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  2
    Ralph B. Smith 1 (2011). Historical Explanation: From Narrative to Causation–and Back? History of European Ideas 37 (3):382-395.
    This article reflects on the relationship between historical writing and enquiry and philosophy, and more particularly the manner in which the pursuit of a particular natural philosophy can influence historical narratives. The article begins with a comparison of Roman and Greek approaches to history, employing a distinction between narrative and logic. It goes on to consider the impact of Christianity, the relationship between enlightenment narratives and philosophical developments regarding the nature of causation, and the Hegel/Marx critique of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  3
    Henry Ashby Turner Jr (1999). Human Agency and Impersonal Determinants in Historical Causation: A Response to David Lindenfeld. History and Theory 38 (3):300–306.
    Lindenfeld's proposed reclassification of causes-offered in lieu of a chaos theory applicable to history-yields paradoxical results when applied to the developments that installed Hitler in power, since these would have to rank as "constraining" rather than "empowering" because of his lack of control over them. The "principle of sensitive dependence," while an admirable aspiration, proves a counsel of perfection beyond reach of the historian when applied to those same events. As to historical explanations in terms of structural, impersonal determinants, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Martin A. Bertman (1991). Body and Cause in Hobbes: Natural and Political. Longman Academic.
  49. Thomas Brown (1806). The Doctrine of Mr. Hume: Concerning the Relation of Cause and Effect. Garland Pub..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Francesco Cerrato (2008). Cause E Nozioni Comuni Nella Filosofia di Spinoza. Quodlibet.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000