Search results for 'Cavell, Charles' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Charles (1999). Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation: David Charles. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):205–223.
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being (eudaimonia) with one activity (intellectual contemplation), sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, (...)
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  2.  12
    Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials Charles J. McCracken Et Ian C. Tipton Collection «Cambridge Philosophical Texts in Context» Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000, X, 300 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):807-.
  3. S. Charles (forthcoming). Session of the Charles S. Peirce Society. Semiotics.
     
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  4.  21
    Michael J. McGandy (2006). Review: Naoko Saito. The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson. American Philosophy Series. Foreword by Stanley Cavell New York: Fordham University Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):303-304.
  5. Rick Anthony Furtak (2007). Skepticism and Perceptual Faith: Henry David Thoreau and Stanley Cavell on Seeing and Believing. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):542 - 561.
    : Thoreau's journal contains a number of passages which explore the nature of perception, developing a response to skeptical doubt. The world outside the human mind is real, and there is nothing illusory about its perceived beauty and meaning. In this essay, I draw upon the work of Stanley Cavell (among others) in order to frame Thoreau's reflections within the context of the skeptical questions he seeks to address. Value is not a subjective projection, but it also cannot be perceived (...)
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  6.  4
    Thomas Wallgren (2013). Stanley Cavell and the Education of Grownups Edited by Naoko Saito and Paul Standish (Review). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (2):257-259.
    The main strength of this volume is its clarity of focus. The focus is on what Hilary Putnam tells us is his “favorite definition of philosophy”, “Stanley Cavell’s ‘education for grownups’” (p. 37). I take it that the quote is Putnam’s favorite not only because of the truth of the definition but also because it may strike many professional philosophers as surprising. It serves to awaken us to the importance of something we know but have forgotten that we know, and (...)
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  7.  6
    Thomas Wallgren (2013). Stanley Cavell and the Education of Grownups Naoko Saito and Paul Standish. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (2):257-259.
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  8.  4
    Douglas R. Anderson (1993). American Loss in Cavell's Emerson. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (1):69 - 89.
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  9.  5
    Stanley Cavell (1987). Freud and Philosophy: A Fragment. Critical Inquiry 13 (2):386-393.
    Other of my intellectual debts remain fully outstanding, that to Freud ’s work before all. A beholdenness to Sigmund Freud ’s intervention in Western culture is hardly something for concealment, but I have until now left my commitment to it fairly implicit. This has been not merely out of intellectual terror at Freud ’s achievement but in service of an idea and in compensation for a dissatisfaction I might formulate as follows: psychoanalytic interpretations of the arts in American culture have, (...)
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  10.  5
    Naoko Saito (2001). Reconstructing Deweyan Pragmatism in Dialogue with Emerson and Cavell. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 37 (3):389 - 406.
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  11. David Perez-Chico (2010). Filosofía sin lágrimas. Breve repaso a la filosofía de Stanley Cavell. In Antonio Lastra (ed.), Stanley Cavell. Mundos vistos y ciudades de palabras. Plaza & Valdés
    El presente trabajo nació como una reflexión posterior a la traducción del libro de Stanley Cavell Contesting Tears: The Hollywood Melodrama of the Unknown Woman. La reflexión era necesaria habida cuenta de las dudas suscitadas por la traducción del título del libro. Para ser más exacto, la reflexión giraba en torno a las lágrimas que forman parte de la primera parte del título, las lágrimas vertidas por las mujeres desconocidas que protagonizan los melodramas analizados en el libro. En mi opinión, (...)
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  12. Douglas R. Anderson & Charles S. Peirce (1995). Strands of System the Philosophy of Charles Peirce. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  13. Kenneth Laine Ketner (1998). His Glassy Essence: An Autobiography of Charles Sanders Peirce. Vanderbilt University Press.
    Charles Sanders Peirce , the most important and influential of the classical American philosophers, is credited as the inventor of the philosophical school of pragmatism. The scope and significance of his work have had a lasting effect not only in several fields of philosophy but also in mathematics, the history and philosophy of science, and the theory of signs, as well as in literary and cultural studies. Largely obscure until after his death, Peirce's life has long been a subject (...)
     
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  14.  11
    Charles Blattberg (2006). Modern Social Imaginaries Charles Taylor Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004, 215 Pp., $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 45 (1):183.
    Review of Charles Taylor's book, Modern Social Imaginaries.
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  15. Charles S. Peirce & Kenneth Laine Ketner (1977). Charles Sanders Peirce Complete Published Works, Including Selected Secondary Materials : Microfiche Collection. Johnson Associates.
     
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  16. Arto Laitinen (2002). Charles Taylor and Paul Ricoeur on Self-Interpretations and Narrative Identity. In Rauno Huttunen, Hannu Heikkinen & Leena Syrjälä (eds.), Narrative Research. Voices of Teachers and Philosophers. SoPhi 57-71.
    In this chapter I discuss Charles Taylor's and Paul Ricoeur's theories of narrative identity and narratives as a central form of self-interpretation. Both Taylor and Ricoeur think that self-identity is a matter of culturally and socially mediated self-definitions, which are practically relevant for one's orientation in life. First, I will go through various characterisations that Ricoeur gives of his theory, and try to show to what extent they also apply to Taylor's theory. Then, I will analyse more closely (...)
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  17. Arto Laitinen (2004). A Critique of Charles Taylor's Notions of “Moral Sources” and “Constitutive Goods”. In Jussi Kotkavirta & Michael Quante (eds.), Moral Realism. Acta Philosophica Fennica 73-104.
    In this paper I argue that moral realism does not, pace Charles Taylor, need “moral sources” or “constitutive goods”, and adding these concepts distorts the basic insights of what can be called “cultural” moral realism.1 Yet the ideas of “moral topography” or “moral space” as well as the idea of “ontological background pictures” are valid, if separated from those notions. What does Taylor mean by these notions?
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  18. Arto Laitinen (2003). Charles Taylor and Nicholas H. Smith on Human Constants and Transcendental Arguments. A Review. [REVIEW] SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):191-201.
    In the introduction to his Philosophical Papers 1&2 Charles Taylor assures us that his work, while encompassing a range of issues, follows a single, tightly knit agenda. He claims that the central questions concern "philosophical anthropology". Taylor's work on these questions has been presented piecemeal, in the form of articles and papers, and the student has had to imagine what a systematic monograph by Taylor on philosophical anthropology would look like. Neither Hegel, Sources of the Self, Ethics of Authenticity, (...)
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  19.  65
    Judith Wolfe (2013). ‘The Ordinary’ in Stanley Cavell and Jacques Derrida. Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17.
    This paper analyses the opposing accounts of ‘the ordinary’ given by Jacques Derrida and Stanley Cavell, beginning with their competing interpretations of J. L. Austin¹s thought on ordinary language. These accounts are presented as mutually critiquing: Derrida¹s deconstructive method poses an effective challenge to Cavell¹s claim that the ordinary is irreducible by further philosophical analysis, while, conversely, Cavell¹s valorisation of the human draws attention to a residual humanity in Derrida¹s text which Derrida cannot account for. The two philosophers’ approaches are, (...)
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  20. Arto Laitinen (2001). Today and Tomorrow: Review of Charles Taylor by Ruth Abbey. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 30:108.
    The Philosophy Now series promises to combine rigorous analysis with authoritative expositions. Ruth Abbey’s book lives up to this demand by being a clear, reliable and more than up-to-date introduction to <span class='Hi'>Charles</span> Taylor’s philosophy. Although it is an introductory book, the amount of footnotes and references ought to please those who want to study the original texts more closely. Abbey’s book is structured thematically: morality, selfhood, politics and epistemology get 50 pages each. The focus is on the (...)
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  21.  9
    Ruth Abbey (ed.) (2004). Charles Taylor. Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taylor is beyond question one of the most distinctive figures in the landscape of contemporary philosophy. In a time of increasing specialization Taylor's ability to contribute to philosophical conversations across a wide spectrum of ideas is distinctive and impressive. These areas include moral theory, theories of subjectivity, political theory, epistemology, hermeneutics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and aesthetics. His most recent writings have seen him branching into the study of religion. Written by a team of international authorities, (...)
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  22.  17
    Carl R. Hausman (1993). Charles S. Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this systematic introduction to the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, the author focuses on four of Peirce's fundamental conceptions: pragmatism and Peirce's development of it into what he called 'pragmaticism'; his theory of signs; his phenomenology; and his theory that continuity is of prime importance for philosophy. He argues that at the centre of Peirce's philosophical project is a unique form of metaphysical realism, whereby continuity and evolutionary change are both necessary for our understanding of experience. In his (...)
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  23.  6
    Joseph Brent (1993). Charles Sanders Peirce: A Life. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (2):531-538.
    Charles Sanders Peirce was born in September 1839 and died five months before the guns of August 1914. He is perhaps the most important mind the United States has ever produced. He made significant contributions throughout his life as a mathematician, astronomer, chemist, geodesist, surveyor, cartographer, metrologist, engineer, and inventor. He was a psychologist, a philologist, a lexicographer, a historian of science, a lifelong student of medicine, and, above all, a philosopher, whose special fields were logic and semiotics. He (...)
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  24.  13
    Michael L. Morgan (2007/2009). Discovering Levinas. Cambridge University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas is well known to students of twentieth-century continental philosophy and especially French philosophy. But he is largely unknown within the circles of Anglo-American philosophy. In Discovering Levinas, Michael L. Morgan shows how this thinker faces in novel and provocative ways central philosophical problems of twentieth century philosophy and religious thought. He tackles this task by placing Levinas in conversation with philosophers such as Donald Davidson, Stanley Cavell, John McDowell, Onora O'Neill, Charles Taylor, and Cora Diamond. He also (...)
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  25. Chantal Bax (2013). Reading 'On Certainty' Through the Lens of Cavell: Scepticism, Dogmatism and the 'Groundlessness of Our Believing'. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (4):515 - 533.
    While Cavell is well known for his reinterpretation of the later Wittgenstein, he has never really engaged himself with post-Investigations writings like On Certainty. This collection may, however, seem to undermine the profoundly anti-dogmatic reading of Wittgenstein that Cavell has developed. In addition to apparently arguing against what Cavell calls ‘the truth of skepticism’ – a phrase contested by other Wittgensteinians – On Certainty may seem to justify the rejection of whoever dares to question one’s basic presuppositions. According to On (...)
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  26.  4
    Sandra B. Rosenthal (1994). Charles Peirce's Pragmatic Pluralism. State University of New York Press.
    This work runs counter to the traditional interpretations of Peirce's philosophy by eliciting an inherent strand of pragmatic pluralism that is embedded in the very core of his thought and that weaves his various doctrines into a systematic ...
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  27.  8
    Stephen Mulhall (1999). Stanley Cavell: Philosophy's Recounting of the Ordinary. Clarendon Press.
    Stephen Mulhall presents the first full philosophical study of the work of Stanley Cavell. Cavell, a leading contemporary American thinker, is best known for his highly influential contributions to the fields of film studies, Shakespearian literary criticism, and the confluence of psychoanalysis and literary theory; Mulhall examines the broad spectrum of his thought, elucidating its essentially philosophical roots and trajectory.
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  28. Jaime Nubiola, The Spanish Mathematician Ventura Reyes Prósper and His Connections with Charles S. Peirce and Christine Ladd-Franklin. Arisbe. The Peirce Gateway.
    In this paper the relations between the almost unknown Spanish mathematician Ventura Reyes Prósper (1863-1922) with Charles S. Peirce and Christine Ladd-Franklin are described. Two brief papers from Reyes Prósper published in El Progreso Matemático 12 (20 December 1891), pp. 297-300, and 18 (15 June 1892) pp. 170-173 on Ladd-Franklin, and on Peirce and Mitchell, respectively, are translated for first time into English and included at the end of the paper.
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  29.  3
    Didier Zúñiga (2015). Pluralisme et sécularisation : une critique de Charles Taylor. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 10 (2):65-88.
    Didier Zúñiga | : Le présent article examine la façon dont Charles Taylor a entrepris de poser le problème politique de la sécularisation. Plus spécifiquement, nous voudrions montrer que, si son effort pour articuler une théorie de l’aménagement de la diversité morale et religieuse a certes contribué à critiquer les régimes rigides de la laïcité, Taylor accorde une prééminence incontestable à la liberté de conscience. Or, notre analyse entend démontrer que, selon cette vue, il n’y a pas de place (...)
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  30.  1
    Timothy Gould (1998). Hearing Things: Voice and Method in the Writing of Stanley Cavell. University of Chicago Press.
    Hearing Things is the first work to treat systematically the relation between Cavell's pervasive authorial voice and his equally powerful, though less discernible, impulse to produce a set of usable philosophical methods.
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  31.  17
    Stanley Cavell (1996). The Cavell Reader. Blackwell.
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  32. Charles S. Peirce & Victoria Welby (1977). Semiotic and Significs the Correspondence Between Charles S. Peirce and Lady Victoria Welby. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  33.  24
    Alice Crary & Sanford Shieh (eds.) (2006). Reading Cavell. Routledge.
    Alongside Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam and Jacques Derrida, Stanley Cavell is arguably one of the best-known philosophers in the world. In this state-of-the-art collection, Alice Crary explores the work of this original and interesting figure who has already been the subject of a number of books, conferences and Phd theses. A philosopher whose work encompasses a broad range of interests, such as Wittgenstein, scepticism in philosophy, the philosophy of art and film, Shakespeare, and philosophy of mind and language, Cavell has (...)
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  34.  1
    Gerard Deledalle (2001). Charles S. Peirce's Philosophy of Signs: Essays in Comparative Semiotics. Indiana University Press.
    [Note: Picture of Peirce available] Charles S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs Essays in Comparative Semiotics Gérard Deledalle Peirce’s semiotics and metaphysics compared to the thought of other leading philosophers. "This is essential reading for anyone who wants to find common ground between the best of American semiotics and better-known European theories. Deledalle has done more than anyone else to introduce Peirce to European audiences, and now he sends Peirce home with some new flare."—Nathan Houser, Director, Peirce Edition Project (...) S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs examines Peirce’s philosophy and semiotic thought from a European perspective, comparing the American’s unique views with a wide variety of work by thinkers from the ancients to moderns. Parts I and II deal with the philosophical paradigms which are at the root of Peirce’s new theory of signs, pragmatic and social. The main concepts analyzed are those of "sign" and "semiosis" and their respective trichotomies; formally in the case of "sign," in time in the case of semiosis. Part III is devoted to comparing Peirce’s theory of semiotics as a form of logic to the work of other philosophers, including Bertrand Russell, Wittgenstein, Frege, Philodemus, Lady Welby, Saussure, Morris, Jakobson, and Marshall McLuhan. Part IV compares Peirce’s "scientific metaphysics" with European metaphysics. Gérard Deledalle holds the Doctorate in Philosophy from the Sorbonne. A research scholar at Columbia University and Attaché at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, he has also been Professor of Philosophy and Head of the Philosophy Department of the universities of Tunis, Perpignan, and Libreville. In 1990 he received the Herbert W. Schneider Award "for distinguished contributions to the understanding and development of American philosophy. In 2001, he was appointed vice-president of the Charles S. Peirce Society. Contents Introduction—Peirce Compared: Directions for Use Part I—Semeiotic as Philosophy Peirce’s New Philosophical Paradigms Peirce’s Philosophy of Semeiotic Peirce’s First Pragmatic Papers The Postscriptum of 1893 Part II—Semeiotic as Semiotics Sign: Semiosis and Representamen—Semiosis and Time Sign: The Concept and Its Use—Reading as Translation Part III—Comparative Semiotics Semiotics and Logic: A Reply to Jerzy Pelc Semeiotic and Greek Logic: Peirce and Philodemus Semeiotic and Significs: Peirce and Lady Welby Semeiotic and Semiology: Peirce and Saussure Semeiotic and Semiotics: Peirce and Morris Semeiotic and Linguistics: Peirce and Jakobson Semeiotic and Communication: Peirce and McLuhan Semeiotic and Epistemology: Peirce, Frege, and Wittgenstein Part IV—Comparative Metaphysics Gnoseology—Perceiving and Knowing: Peirce, Wittgenstein, and Gestalttheorie Ontology—Transcendentals "of" or "without" Being: Peirce versus Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas Cosmology—Chaos and Chance within Order and Continuity: Peirce between Plato and Darwin Theology—The Reality of God: Peirce’s Triune God and the Church’s Trinity Conclusion—Peirce: A Lateral View. (shrink)
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  35.  21
    Andrew John Norris (ed.) (2006). The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    Stanley Cavell's unique contributions to the study of epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, film, Shakespeare, and American philosophy have all received wide acclaim. But there has been relatively little recognition of the pertinence of Cavell's work to our understanding of political philosophy. The Claim to Community fills this gap with essays from a wide range of prominent American, English, French, and Italian philosophers and political theorists, as well as a lengthy response to the essays by Cavell himself. The topics covered include Cavell's (...)
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  36.  84
    Avner Baz (2008). The Reaches of Words. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (1):31 – 56.
    This paper compares and contrasts two ways of going on from Wittgenstein and, to a lesser extent, Austin. The first is Charles Travis'. The second is Stanley Cavell's. Focusing on our concept of propositional knowledge ('knowing that such and such'), I argue that Travis' tendency to think of language and its concepts as essentially in the business of enabling us to represent (describe, think of) things as being one way or another and his consequent neglect of the question of (...)
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  37.  52
    John F. Boler (1963). Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism. Seattle, University of Washington Press.
    IN 1903, commenting on an article he had written more than thirty years before, Charles Peirce said that he had changed his mind on many issues at least a half-dozen times but had "never been able to think differently on that question of nominalism and realism" (1.20). For anyone acquainted with Peirce's writings, this remark alone could justify a study of "that question.".
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  38.  8
    Ian Hunter (2011). Charles Taylor's A Secular Age and Secularization in Early Modern Germany. Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):621-646.
    In this essay I discuss the historical adequacy of Charles Taylor's philosophical history of secularization, as presented in his A Secular Age . I do so by situating it in relation to the contextual historiography of secularization in early modern Europe, with a particular focus on developments in the German Empire. Considering how profoundly conceptions of secularization have been bound to competing religious and political programmes, we must begin our discussion by entertaining the possibility that modern philosophical and historiographic (...)
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  39.  13
    Jeremy Dunham (2015). Idealism, Pragmatism, and the Will to Believe: Charles Renouvier and William James. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (4):1-23.
    This article investigates the history of the relation between idealism and pragmatism by examining the importance of the French idealist Charles Renouvier for the development of William James's ‘Will to Believe’. By focusing on French idealism, we obtain a broader understanding of the kinds of idealism on offer in the nineteenth century. First, I show that Renouvier's unique methodological idealism led to distinctively pragmatist doctrines and that his theory of certitude and its connection to freedom is worthy of (...)
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  40.  72
    Matthew Walhout (2010). Looking to Charles Taylor and Joseph Rouse for Best Practices in Science and Religion. Zygon 45 (3):558-574.
    People discussing science and religion usually frame their conversations in terms of essentialist assumptions about science, assumptions requiring the existence (but not the specification) of criteria according to which science can be distinguished from other forms of inquiry. However, criteria functioning at a level of generality appropriate to such discussions may not exist at all. Essentialist assumptions may be avoided if science is understood within a broader context of human practices. In a philosophy of practices, to label a practice as (...)
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  41.  5
    Peter S. Fosl (2015). Scepticism and Naturalism in Cavell and Hume. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5 (1):29-54.
    _ Source: _Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 29 - 54 This essay argues that the exploration of scepticism and its implications in the work of Stanley Cavell and David Hume bears more similarities than is commonly acknowledged, especially along the lines of what I wish to call “sceptical naturalism.” These lines of similarity are described through the way each philosopher relates the “natural” and “nature” to the universal, the necessary, and the conventional.
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  42.  30
    Piers J. Hale (2013). Monkeys Into Men and Men Into Monkeys: Chance and Contingency in the Evolution of Man, Mind and Morals in Charles Kingsley's Water Babies. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):551-597.
    The nineteenth century theologian, author and poet Charles Kingsley was a notable populariser of Darwinian evolution. He championed Darwin’s cause and that of honesty in science for more than a decade from 1859 to 1871. Kingsley’s interpretation of evolution shaped his theology, his politics and his views on race. The relationship between men and apes set the context for Kingsley’s consideration of these issues. Having defended Darwin for a decade in 1871 Kingsley was dismayed to read Darwin’s account of (...)
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  43.  7
    Alice Le Goff (2015). Stratification, luttes sociales et démocratie chez Charles Wright Mills. Astérion 13.
    Dans cet article, nous développons une réflexion sur le conflit en démocratie en nous appuyant sur une étude du parcours et des travaux de Charles Wright Mills. Comme celle de Pierre Bourdieu qui lui fait écho sur de nombreux points et avec laquelle nous l’entrecroisons, la démarche de Mills fournit les bases d’une réflexion sur les conditions sociales d’une authentique conflictualité démocratique, orientée vers une déconstruction de certaines formes de domination. Tout d’abord, le travail de Mills intègre un questionnement (...)
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  44.  57
    Hailey Huget (2012). Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Accountability: A Critique of Charles Griswold's Forgiveness Paradigm. Philosophia 40 (2):337-355.
    Abstract In this paper I analyze and critique Charles Griswold’s work Forgiveness: A Philosophical Exploration. Griswold’s theory of forgiveness is structured around the notion that human frailty, imperfection, and susceptibility to unfortunate circumstances are cornerstones of the human experience. While Griswold’s paradigm of forgiveness is compelling on the whole, I argue that this “human frailty thesis” creates unintentional and problematic consequences that undermine major goals of his paradigm. In particular, the human frailty thesis undermines Griswold’s requirement that forgiveness hold (...)
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  45.  10
    Michael Peters (2001). Wittgensteinian Pedagogics: Cavell on the Figure of the Child in the Investigations. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):125-138.
    This paper discusses Stanley Cavell's approach to the Investigations,focusing upon his essay – `Notes and Afterthoughts on the Opening ofWittgenstein's Investigations'. First, the paper investigates the waysin which Cavell makes central the figure and `voice' of the child to hisreading of the opening of the Investigations. Second, it argues thatCavell's Notes provides a basis for a Wittgensteinian pedagogics,for not only does it hold up the figure of the child as central to the Investigations but it does so in a philosophical (...)
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  46.  4
    Duncan Pritchard (2015). Preface to the Cavell Symposium. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5 (1):1-1.
    _ Source: _Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 1 - 1 A preface to a symposium devoted to Stanley Cavell’s The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy, featuring papers by Peter Fosl, Andrea Kern, and Stephen Mulhall.
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  47.  18
    Kei Hiruta (2006). What Pluralism, Why Pluralism, and How? A Response to Charles Ess. Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):227-236.
    In this critical response to Charles Ess’ ‚Ethical Pluralism and Global Information Ethics’ presented in this Special Issue of Ethics and Information Technology, it is firstly argued that his account of pros hen pluralism can be more accurately reformulated as a three layered doctrine by separating one acceptance of diversity at a cultural level and another at an ethical theoretic level. Following this clarificatory section, the next section considers Ess’ political and sociological reasons for the necessity and desirability of (...)
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  48.  45
    Hartmut Rosa & Arto Laitinen (2002). On Identity, Alienation and Consequences of September 11th. An Interview with Charles Taylor. In Arto Laitinen & Nicholas H. Smith (eds.), Perspectives on the Philosophy of Charles Taylor. Acta Philosophica Fennica 165-195.
    HR/AL: Professor Taylor, what are you working on these days? CT: Well, several things. One of the things I am working on is something I was lecturing this fall at the New School University, and that I have called ‘modern social imaginaries’. It is an attempt to understand western modernity in terms of the different ways in which people imagine their social existence. These imaginaries are a condition for new kinds of practices that are characteristic of modernity. This research is (...)
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    Matthew Lister (2015). Four Entries for the Rawls Lexicon: Charles Beitz, H.L.A. Hart, Citizen, Sovereignty. In Jon Mandle & David Reidy (eds.), The Cambridge Rawls Lexicon. Cambridge University Press
    These are for entries for _The Cambridge Rawls Lexicon_, edited by Jon Mandle and David Reidy, on H.L.A. Hart, Charles Beitz, Sovereignty, and Citizen.
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    Keith A. Wilson (2014). Review of Charles Travis, Perception: Essays After Frege. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014 (April).
    Charles Travis’s new collection on perception brings together eleven of his previously published essays on this topic, some of which are substantially revised, plus one new essay. The intentionally ambiguous subtitle hints at the author’s endorsement of Fregean anti-psychologism, though influences from Wittgenstein and Austin are equally apparent. The work centres around two major questions in the philosophy of mind and perception. First, Travis argues against the view that perceptual experience, as distinct from perceptual judgement or belief, is representational, (...)
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