1. Brent Simpson, Robb Willer & Cecilia L. Ridgeway (2012). Status Hierarchies and the Organization of Collective Action. Sociological Theory 30 (3):149 - 166.
    Most work on collective action assumes that group members are undifferentiated by status, or standing, in the group. Yet such undifferentiated groups are rare, if they exist at all. Here we extend an existing sociological research program to address how extant status hierarchies help organize collective actions by coordinating how much and when group members should contribute to group efforts. We outline three theoretically derived predictions of how status hierarchies organize patterns of behavior to produce larger public goods. We review (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  13
    Joseph Berger, Cecilia L. Ridgeway & Morris Zelditch (2002). Construction of Status and Referential Structures. Sociological Theory 20 (2):157-179.
    Beliefs about diverse status characteristics have a common core content of performance capacities and qualities made up of two features: hierarchy (superior/inferior capacities) and role-differentiation (instrumental/expressive qualities). Whatever the status characteristic, its more-valued state tends to be defined as superior and instrumental, and the less-valued state tends to be defined as inferior but expressive. We account for this in terms of the typification of differences in behavioral inequalities and profiles that emerge in task oriented social interaction. Status construction theory argues (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  2
    Joseph Berger, Cecilia L. Ridgeway & Morris Zelditch (2002). Construction of Status and Referential Structures. Sociological Theory 20 (2):157-179.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography