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Cedric E. Dawkins [6]Cedric Dawkins [2]
  1. Cedric E. Dawkins (2013). The Principle of Good Faith: Toward Substantive Stakeholder Engagement. Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.
    Although stakeholder theory is concerned with stakeholder engagement, substantive operational barometers of engagement are lacking in the literature. This theoretical paper attempts to strengthen the accountability aspect of normative stakeholder theory with a more robust notion of stakeholder engagement derived from the concept of good faith. Specifically, it draws from the labor relations field to argue that altered power dynamics are essential underpinnings of a viable stakeholder engagement mechanism. After describing the tenets of substantive engagement, the paper draws from the (...)
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  2. Cedric E. Dawkins (2012). Labored Relations. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):473-500.
    Globalization has brought increased attention to the notion that labor rights such as freedom of association—the right of workers to organize a union—are fundamental human rights. However, the vigorous opposition to freedom of associa­tion by US firms is largely ignored in the business ethics literature and exacerbated by compensatory corporate citizenship rating mechanisms that tend to mask labor rights deficiencies. I argue that because freedom of association is a hypernorm, instrumental to fully realizing basic human rights, labor rights and human (...)
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  3. Cedric E. Dawkins & John W. Fraas (2011). Erratum To: Beyond Acclamations and Excuses: Environmental Performance, Voluntary Environmental Disclosure and the Role of Visibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (3):383 - 397.
    Some researchers have argued that firms with favorable environmental performance are more likely to provide voluntary environmental disclosure, while others have argued that firms with poor environmental performance are most likely to disclose. The authors propose a curvilinear relation between environmental performance and environmental disclosure that is moderated by visibility. Data were obtained from S&P 500 firms queried by Ceres' Climate Disclosure Project. Results show a U-shaped environmental performance—environmental disclosure relation and a main effect for visibility but no moderating effect (...)
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  4. Cedric Dawkins & John W. Fraas (2011). Coming Clean: The Impact of Environmental Performance and Visibility on Corporate Climate Change Disclosure. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):303 - 322.
    Previous research provides mixed results on the relationship between corporate environmental performance and the level of voluntary environmental disclosure. We revisit this relation by testing competing predictions from defensive and accommodative approaches to voluntary disclosure with regard to climate change. In particular, we add to the prior literature by determining the extent to which environmental performance and company media visibility interact to prompt voluntary climate change disclosure. Using ordinal regression and Ceres, KLD, and Trucost ratings of S& P 500 companies, (...)
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  5. Cedric Dawkins (2010). Beyond Wages and Working Conditions: A Conceptualization of Labor Union Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):129 - 143.
    This article integrates theory and concepts from the business and society, business ethics, and labor relations literatures to offer a conceptualization of labor union social responsibility that includes activities geared toward three primary objectives: economic equity, workplace democracy, and social justice. Economic, workplace, and social labor union stakeholders are identified, likely issues are highlighted, and the implications of labor union social responsibility for labor union strategy are discussed. It is noted that, given the breadth of labor unions in a global (...)
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  6. Cedric E. Dawkins & John W. Fraas (2010). Beyond Acclamations and Excuses: Environmental Performance, Voluntary Environmental Disclosure, and the Role of Visibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):655.
    Some researchers have argued that firms with favorable environmental performance are more likely to provide voluntary environmental disclosure, while others have argued that firms with poor environmental performance are most likely to disclose. The authors propose a curvilinear relation between environmental performance and environmental disclosure that is moderated by visibility. Data were obtained from S&P 500 firms queried by the Ceres’ Climate Disclosure Project. Results show a U-shaped environmental performance–environmental disclosure relation and a main effect for visibility, but no moderating (...)
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  7. Cedric E. Dawkins (2005). First to Market: Issue Management Pacesetters and the Pharmaceutical Industry Response to AIDS in Africa. Business and Society 44 (3):244-282.
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  8. Cedric E. Dawkins (2002). Corporate Welfare, Corporate Citizenship, and the Question of Accountability. Business and Society 41 (3):269-291.
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