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  1. Mariam Fraser, Sarah Kember & Celia Lury (eds.) (2006). Inventive Life: Approaches to the New Vitalism. Sage.
    This book demonstrates how and why vitalism—the idea that life cannot be explained by the principles of mechanism—matters now. Vitalism resists closure and reductionism in the life sciences while simultaneously addressing the object of life itself. The aim of this collection is to consider the questions that vitalism makes it possible to ask: questions about the role and status of life across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities and questions about contingency, indeterminacy, relationality and change. All have special importance now, (...)
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  2. Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (1991). Feminism, Marxism and Thatcherism. In Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.), Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic. 21--46.
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  3. Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) (1991). Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic.
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  4. Celia Lury (1991). Reading the Self: Autobiography, Gender and the Institution of the Literary. In Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.), Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic. 97--108.
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