Search results for 'Cerebellum*' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Manon Grube, Kwang-Hyuk Lee, Timothy D. Griffiths, Anthony T. Barker & Peter W. Woodruff (2010). Transcranial Magnetic Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Human Cerebellum Distinguishes Absolute, Duration-Based From Relative, Beat-Based Perception of Subsecond Time Intervals. Frontiers in Psychology 1:171-171.score: 18.0
    Cerebellar functions in two types of perceptual timing were assessed: the absolute (duration-based) timing of single intervals and the relative (beat-based) timing of rhythmic sequences. Continuous transcranial magnetic theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) was applied over the medial cerebellum and performance was measured adaptively before and after stimulation. A large and significant effect was found in the TBS (n=12) compared to the SHAM (n=12) group for single-interval timing but not for the detection of a regular beat or a deviation from it. The (...)
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  2. Anne-Lise Jouen, Willem B. Verwey, Jurjen Van Der Helden, Christian Scheiber, Remi Neveu, Peter Ford Dominey & Jocelyne Ventre-Dominey (2013). Discrete Sequence Production With and Without a Pause: The Role of Cortex, Basal Ganglia and Cerebellum. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Our sensorimotor experience unfolds in sequences over time. We hypothesize that the processing of movement sequences with and without a temporal pause will recruit distinct but cooperating neural processes, including cortico-striatal and cortico-cerebellar networks. We thus compare neural activity during sequence learning in the presence and absence of this pause. Young volunteer participants learned sensorimotor sequences using the discrete sequence production (DSP) task, with Pause, No-Pause and Control sequences of four elements in an event related fMRI protocol. The No-Pause and (...)
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  3. W. T. Thach (1996). On the Specific Role of the Cerebellum in Motor Learning and Cognition: Clues From PET Activation and Lesion Studies in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):411-433.score: 18.0
    Brindley proposed that we initially generate movements , under higher cerebral control. As the movement is practiced, the cerebellum learns to link within itself the context in which the movement is made to the lower level movement generators. Marr and Albus proposed that the linkage is established by a special input from the inferior olive, which plays upon an input-output element within the cerebellum during the period of the learning. When the linkage is complete, the occurrence of the context (represented (...)
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  4. Ulf Ziemann Ming-Kuei Lu, Chon-Haw Tsai (2012). Cerebellum to Motor Cortex Paired Associative Stimulation Induces Bidirectional STDP-Like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    The cerebellum is crucially important for motor control and motor adaptation. Recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies have indicated the possibility to alter the excitability of the cerebellum and its projections to the contralateral motor cortex, with behavioral consequences on motor control and motor adaptation. Here we sought to induce bidirectional spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP)-like modifications of motor cortex (M1) excitability by application of paired associative stimulation (PAS) in healthy subjects. Conditioning stimulation over the right lateral cerebellum (CB) preceded focal TMS (...)
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  5. Arthur I. Miller (2007). Unconscious Thought, Intuition, and Visual Imagery: A Critique of "Working Memory, Cerebellum, and Creativity". Creativity Research Journal 19 (1):47-48.score: 15.0
  6. Jun Wang, Gregory Dam, Sule Yildirim, William Rand, Uri Wilensky & James C. Houk (2008). Reciprocity Between the Cerebellum and the Cerebral Cortex: Nonlinear Dynamics in Microscopic Modules for Generating Voluntary Motor Commands. Complexity 14 (2):29-45.score: 15.0
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  7. F. Crépel, N. Hemart, D. Jaillard & H. Daniel (1996). Cellular Mechanisms of Long-Term Depression in the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):347-353.score: 15.0
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  8. Ralph D. Ellis (2001). A Theoretical Model of the Role of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Attention and Consciousness. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):300-309.score: 15.0
  9. Natika Newton (2001). The Function of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Affect and Consciousness: Empirical Support for the Embodied Mind--Introduction. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):273-276.score: 15.0
  10. Allan M. Smith (1996). Does the Cerebellum Learn Strategies for the Optimal Time-Varying Control of Joint Stiffness? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):399-410.score: 15.0
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  11. Edward M. Hubbard & Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (2004). The Size-Weight Illusion, Emulation, and the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):407-408.score: 12.0
    In this commentary we discuss a predictive sensorimotor illusion, the size-weight illusion, in which the smaller of two objects of equal weight is perceived as heavier. We suggest that Grush's emulation theory can explain this illusion as a mismatch between predicted and actual sensorimotor feedback, and present preliminary data suggesting that the cerebellum may be critical for implementing the emulator.
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  12. J. D. Schmahmann, C. M. Anderson, N. Newton & R. Ellis (2002). The Function of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Affect and Consciousness: Empirical Support for the Embodied Mind. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):273-309.score: 12.0
    Editors’ note: These four interrelated discussions of the role of the cerebellum in coordinating emotional and higher cognitive functions developed out of a workshop presented by the four authors for the 2000 Conference of the Cognitive Science Society at the University of Pennsylvania. The four interrelated discussions explore the implications of the recent explosion of cerebellum research suggesting an expanded cerebellar role in higher cognitive functions as well as in the coordination of emotional functions with learning, logical thinking, perceptual consciousness, (...)
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  13. R. J. Harvey (1997). Patterns of Organisation in the Cerebellum and the Control of Timing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):251-252.score: 12.0
    Precise timing of muscle contractions is an important prerequisite for motor control and one to which the cerebellum contributes. Braitenberg et al.'s detailed timing hypotheses relate only to a subset of the known features of the organisation of the cerebellum. However, the cerebellar architecture clearly supports the that are central to the authors' proposal and such tidal waves are very likely to contribute to its functions.
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  14. Robert E. Shaw, Endre E. Kadar & M. T. Turvey (1997). The Job Description of the Cerebellum and a Candidate Model of its “Tidal Wave” Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):265-265.score: 12.0
    A path space integral approach to modelling the job description of the cerebellum is proposed. This new approach incorporates the equation into a kind of generalized Huygens's wave equation. The resulting exponential functional integral provides a mathematical expression of the inhibitory function by which the cerebellum the intended control signal from the background of neuronal excitation.
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  15. Stephan P. Swinnen, Charles B. Walter & Natalia Dounskaia (1996). We Know a Lot About the Cerebellum, but Do We Know What Motor Learning Is? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):474-475.score: 12.0
    In the behavioral literature on human movement, a distinction is made between the learning of parameters and the learning of new movement forms or topologies. Whereas the target articles by Thach, Smith, and Houk et al. provide evidence for cerebellar involvement in parametrization learning and adaptation, the evidence in favor of its involvement in the generation of new movement patterns is less straightforward. A case is made for focusing more attention on the latter issue in the future. This would directly (...)
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  16. Eric Courchesne (1997). Prediction and Preparation: Anticipatory Role of the Cerebellum in Diverse Neurobehavioral Functions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):248-249.score: 12.0
    Braitenberg et al.'s view that the cerebellum contributes to multijoint sequences of movement is too narrow to account adequately for results from new anatomical, neurobehavioral, and neuroimaging studies. A broader view is that the cerebellum modulates attention, sensory, motor, and other neural systems in order to accomplish its prime function, which is to learn to predict and prepare for imminent information acquisition, analysis, or action.
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  17. James C. Houk, Jay T. Buckingham & Andrew G. Barto (1996). Models of the Cerebellum and Motor Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):368-383.score: 12.0
    This article reviews models of the cerebellum and motor learning, from the landmark papers by Marr and Albus through those of the present time. The unique architecture of the cerebellar cortex is ideally suited for pattern recognition, but how is pattern recognition incorporated into motor control and learning systems? The present analysis begins with a discussion of exactly what the cerebellar cortex needs to regulate through its anatomically defined projections to premotor networks. Next, we examine various models showing how the (...)
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  18. Franz Mechsner & Günther Palm (1997). Is the Cerebellum Essentially a Precise Pattern Matching Device? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):257-257.score: 12.0
    (1) The is not the only interpretation of cerebellar histology worth considering. Therefore, it is not imperative to strive for a theory of cerebellar function which gives it a prominent rôle. (2) The experiments with cannot support the tidal wave theory. (3) The notion that only can excite the cerebellar cortex is burdened with many intrinsic difficulties. (4) The common theoretical claim that the accuracy of skilled movements is due to exact pattern-matching processes in the cerebellum may be most misleading.
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  19. R. C. Miall, M. Malkmus & E. M. Robertson (1996). Sensory Prediction as a Role for the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):466-467.score: 12.0
    We suggest that the cerebellum generates sensory or estimates based on outgoing motor commands and sensory feedback. Thus, it is not a motor pattern generator (HOUK et al.) but a predictive system which is intimately involved in motor behavior. This theory may explain the sensitivity of the climbing fibers to both unexpected external events and motor errors (SIMPSON et al.), and we speculate that unusual biophysical properties of the inferior olive might allow the cerebellum to develop multiple asynchronous sensory estimates, (...)
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  20. Shane M. O'Mara (1996). The Cerebellum and Cerebral Cortex: Contrasting and Converging Contributions to Spatial Navigation and Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):469-470.score: 12.0
    Thach's target article presents a remarkable overview and integration of animal and human studies on the functions of the cerebellum and makes clear theoretical predictions for both the normal operation of the cerebellum and for the effects of cerebellar lesions in the mature human. Commentary is provided on three areas, namely, spatial navigation, implicit learning, and cerebellar agenesis to elicit further development of the themes already present in Thach's paper, [THACH].
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  21. D. Timmann & H. C. Diener (1996). Limitations of PET and Lesion Studies in Defining the Role of the Human Cerebellum in Motor Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):477-477.score: 12.0
    PET studies using classical conditioning paradigms are reported. It is emphasized that PET studies show and not in learning paradigms. The importance of dissociating motor performance and learning deficits in human lesions studies is demonstrated in two exemplary studies. The different role of the cerebellum in adaptation of postural reflexes and learning of complex voluntary arm movements is discussed, [THACH].
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  22. Helge Topka & Johannes Dichgans (1997). The Cerebellum and the Physics of Movement. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):266-266.score: 12.0
    This commentary reviews the basic physical principles underlying human single- and multi-joint arm movements. The potential role of the cerebellum in dealing with the physics of movement is discussed in the light of recent physiological findings and the theoretical model of cerebellar detection and generation of input and output sequences put forward by Braitenberg and colleagues.
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  23. D. Flament & T. J. Ebner (1996). The Cerebellum as Comparator: Increases in Cerebellar Activity During Motor Learning May Reflect its Role as Part of an Error Detection/Correction Mechanism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):447-448.score: 12.0
    The role of the cerebellum as a comparator of desired motor output and actual performance may be most important during learning of a novel motor task, when movement errors are common and corrective movements are produced to compensate for them. It is suggested that PET and recent fMRI data are compatible with such an interpretation. Increased activity in motor cortical areas during motor learning indicates that these areas also contribute to the learning process, [THACH].
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  24. C. Gielen (1996). Cerebellum Does More Than Recalibration of Movements After Perturbations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):448-449.score: 12.0
    We argue that the function of the cerebellum is more than just an error-detecting mechanism. Rather, the cerebellum plays an important role in all movements. The bias in (re)calibration is an unfortunate restrictive result of a very successful and important experiment, [SMITH, THACH].
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  25. Richard F. Thompson (1996). Motor Learning and Synaptic Plasticity in the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):475-477.score: 12.0
    For reasons I have never understood, some students of the cerebellum have been unwilling to accept the now overwhelming evidence that the cerebellum exhibits lasting synaptic plasticity and plays an essential role in some forms of learning and memory. With a few exceptions (e.g., target article by SIMPSON et al.) this is no longer the case, as is clear in the excellent target articles on cerebellar LTD and the excellent target review by HOUK et al. [CRÉPEL et al.; HOUR et (...)
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  26. Steven R. Vincent (1996). Nitric Oxide and Synaptic Plasticity: NO News From the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):362-367.score: 12.0
    Interest in the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the nervous system began with the demonstration that glutamate receptor activation in cerebellar slices causes the formation of a diffusible messenger with properties similar to those of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor. It is now clear that this is due to the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activation of the enzyme NO synthase, which forms NO and citrulline from the amino acid L-arginine. The cerebellum has very high levels of NO synthase, and although it has low (...)
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  27. Sarah-Jane Blakemore (2003). Deluding the Motor System. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):647-655.score: 9.0
    How do we know that our own actions belong to us? How are we able to distinguish self-generated sensory events from those that arise externally? In this paper, I will briefly discuss experiments that were designed to investigate these questions. In particularly, I will review psychophysical and neuroimaging studies that have investigated how we recognise the consequences of our own actions, and why patients with delusions of control confuse self-produced and externally produced actions and sensations. Studies investigating the failure of (...)
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  28. Daniel M. Wolpert, R. Chris Miall & Mitsuo Kawato (1998). Internal Models in the Cerebellum. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (9):338-347.score: 9.0
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  29. Valentino Braitenberg, Detlef Heck & Fahad Sultan (1997). The Detection and Generation of Sequences as a Key to Cerebellar Function: Experiments and Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):229-245.score: 9.0
    Starting from macroscopic and microscopic facts of cerebellar histology, we propose a new functional interpretation that may elucidate the role of the cerebellum in movement control. The idea is that the cerebellum is a large collection of individual lines (Eccles's : Eccles et al. 1967a) that respond specifically to certain sequences of events in the input and in turn produce sequences of signals in the output. We believe that the sequence-in/sequence-out mode of operation is as typical for the cerebellar cortex (...)
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  30. Valentino Braitenberg, Detlef Heck & Fahad Sultan (1997). Waiting for the Ultimate Theory of the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):267-271.score: 9.0
    Although our idea of sequential input being a key to cerebellar function was taken seriously by most commentators, there were also objections, based in part on experimental evidence that seems to contradict our intuitions and in part on commentators' preferences for different schemes. Several were suspicious of experiments (performed on slices of cerebellar tissue) that may have severed some of the synaptic connections, particularly the inhibitory ones. It is our feeling that a modi-fication of our theory that could satisfy most (...)
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  31. Paul van Donkelaar (1996). Sensorimotor Learning in Structures “Upstream” From the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):477-478.score: 9.0
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  32. Jan Voogd & Mitchell Glickstein (1998). The Anatomy of the Cerebellum. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (9):307-313.score: 9.0
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  33. John E. Desmond & Julie A. Fiez (1998). Neuroimaging Studies of the Cerebellum: Language, Learning and Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (9):355-362.score: 9.0
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  34. William A. MacKay (1997). Why a Sequence Mode If Synchronization Would Fit the Cerebellum Better? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):255-255.score: 9.0
    The model of cerebellar operation is mostly speculation. The same data can be interpreted in a very different way, making fewer assumptions. To wit, sets of Purkinje cells recognize a specific sensorimotor event and trigger a synchronous sensorimotor discharge.
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  35. William T. Thach (1998). What is the Role of the Cerebellum in Motor Learning and Cognition? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (9):331-337.score: 9.0
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  36. John Antrobus (1986). Rapid Eye Movements and the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):400.score: 9.0
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  37. James R. Bloedel (1992). Functional Heterogeneity with Structural Homogeneity: How Does the Cerebellum Operate? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):666-678.score: 9.0
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  38. V. Braitenberg & H. Preissl (1992). Why is the Output of the Cerebellum Inhibitory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):715-717.score: 9.0
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  39. Sharna Jamadar, Joanne Fielding & Gary Egan (2013). Quantitative Meta-Analysis of fMRI and PET Studies Reveals Consistent Activation in Fronto-Striatal-Parietal Regions and Cerebellum During Antisaccades and Prosaccades. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 9.0
    The antisaccade task is a classic task of oculomotor control that requires participants to inhibit a saccade to a target and instead make a voluntary saccade to the mirror opposite location. By comparison, the prosaccade task requires participants to make a visually-guided saccade to the target. These tasks have been studied extensively using behavioural oculomotor, electrophysiological and neuroimaging in both non-human primates and humans. In humans, the antisaccade task is under active investigation as a potential endophenotype or biomarker for multiple (...)
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  40. André Lee, Shinichi Furuya, Matthias Karst & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Alteration in Forward Model Prediction of Sensory Outcome of Motor Action in Focal Hand Dystonia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a movement disorder affecting highly trained movements. Rather than being a pure motor disorder related to movement execution only, movement planning, error prediction and sensorimotor integration are also impaired. Internal models, of which two types, forward and inverse models have been described and most likely processed in the cerebellum, are known to be involved in these tasks. Recent results indicate that the cerebellum may be involved in the pathophysiology of focal dystonia. Thus the aim (...)
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  41. Kerrie P. Lewis & Robert A. Barton (2004). Playing for Keeps. Human Nature 15 (1):5-21.score: 9.0
    The hypothesis that play behavior is more prevalent in larger-brained animals has recently been challenged. It may be, for example, that only certain brain structures are related to play. Here, we analyze social play behavior with regards to the cerebellum: a structure strongly implicated in motor-development, and possibly also in cognitive skills. We present an evolutionary analysis of social play and the cerebellum, using a phylogenetic comparative method. Social play frequency and relative cerebellum size are positively correlated. Hence, there appears (...)
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  42. Moons Lieve (2012). Differential Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -3 in the Developing Cerebellum: Identification of Their Downstream Targets. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 9.0
  43. David A. Mccormick, David G. Lavond, Gregory A. Clark, Ronald E. Kettner, Christina E. Rising & Richard F. Thompson (1981). The Engram Found? Role of the Cerebellum in Classical Conditioning of Nictitating Membrane and Eyelid Responses. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (3):103-105.score: 9.0
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  44. J. Meek (1997). The Cerebellum and Timing: Lessons From Mormyrids. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):258-258.score: 9.0
    Mormyrid teleosts have Purkinje cells with palisade dendrites, which probably represent coincidence detectors of parallel fiber activity. Their existence strongly supports the ideas of Braitenberg et al. on cerebellar function. However, the organization of mormyrid granule cells and parallel fibers suggests that a key to cerebellar function is not in interactions within one wave, but between twoopposite tidal waves.
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  45. Frank A. Middleton & Stephen I. Helms Tillery (2003). Cerebellum. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.score: 9.0
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  46. C.-J. Olsson, Bert Jonsson & Lars Nyberg (2008). Learning by Doing and Learning by Thinking: An fMRI Study of Combining Motor and Mental Training. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:5.score: 9.0
    The current study investigated behavioral and neural effects of motor, mental, and combined motor and mental training on a finger tapping task. The motor or mental training groups trained on a finger-sequence for a total of 72 min over six weeks. The motor and mental training group received 72 min motor training and in addition 72 min mental training. Results showed that all groups increased their tapping performance significantly on the trained sequence. After training fMRI data was collected and indicated (...)
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  47. Christopher H. Yeo & Germund Hesslow (1998). Cerebellum and Conditioned Reflexes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (9):322-330.score: 9.0
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  48. A. J. Bastian, E. Mugnaini & W. T. Thach (1999). Cerebellum. In M. J. Zigmond & F. E. Bloom (eds.), Fundamental Neuroscience. 973--992.score: 9.0
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  49. Curtis Bell, Paul Cordo & Steven Harnad (1996). Controversies in Neuroscience IV: Motor Learning and Synaptic Plasticity in the Cerebellum: Introduction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3).score: 9.0
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  50. James M. Bower (1992). Is the Cerebellum a Motor Control Device? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):714-715.score: 9.0
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