Search results for 'Cerebral' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sigrid Schmitz (2012). The Neurotechnological Cerebral Subject: Persistence of Implicit and Explicit Gender Norms in a Network of Change. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (3):261-274.score: 24.0
    Abstract Under the realm of neurocultures the concept of the cerebral subject emerges as the central category to define the self, socio-cultural interaction and behaviour. The brain is the reference for explaining cognitive processes and behaviour but at the same time the plastic brain is situated in current paradigms of (self)optimization on the market of meritocracy by means of neurotechnologies. This paper explores whether neurotechnological apparatuses may—due to their hybridity and malleability—bear potentials for a change in gender based attributions (...)
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  2. Stephen C. Fowler (2000). Behavioral Tolerance (Contingent Tolerance) Ismediated in Part by Variations in Regional Cerebral Blood Flow. Brain and Mind 1 (1):45-57.score: 24.0
    Concepts and experimental results taken frombehavioral pharmacology, functional brain imaging,brain physiology, and behavioral neuroscience, wereused to develop the hypothesis that behavioraltolerance can, in part, be attributed to cellulartolerance. It is argued that task specific activationof circumscribed neuronal populations gives rise tocorresponding increases in regional cerebral bloodflow such that neurons related to task performance areexposed to higher effective doses of blood-borne drugthan neuronal groups not highly activated by thebehavioral task. Through this cerebral hemodynamicregulatory mechanism cellular tolerance phenomena canat least (...)
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  3. Thomas Dierks Philipp Homan, Jochen Kindler, Martinus Hauf, Sebastian Walther, Daniela Hubl (2013). Repeated Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow in the Left Superior Temporal Gyrus Reveal Tonic Hyperactivity in Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: A Possible Trait Marker. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Background: The left superior temporal gyrus (STG) has been suggested to play a key role in auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Eleven medicated subjects with schizophrenia and medication-resistant auditory verbal hallucinations and 19 healthy controls underwent perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling. Three additional repeated measurements were conducted in the patients. Patients underwent a treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) between the first 2 measurements. The main outcome measure was the pooled cerebral blood flow (...)
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  4. Serge Nicolas Alessandro Guida, Fernand Gobet (2013). Functional Cerebral Reorganization: A Signature of Expertise? Reexamining Guida, Gobet, Tardieu, and Nicolas' (2012) Two-Stage Framework. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Functional cerebral reorganization: a signature of expertise? Reexamining Guida, Gobet, Tardieu, and Nicolas' (2012) two-stage framework.
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  5. Louise Bøttcher (2010). An Eye for Possibilities in the Development of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Neurobiology and Neuropsychology in a Cultural-Historical Dynamic Understanding. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 12 (1):3-23.score: 24.0
    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early brain lesion of CP is reconceptualised as a neurobiological constraint that exists in the relations between the neural, cognitive and social levels. Through a multi-method study of two children with CP, it is analysed how neurobiological constraints (...)
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  6. Pedro Montoya Inmaculada Riquelme, Anna Zamorano (2013). Reduction of Pain Sensitivity After Somatosensory Therapy in Adults with Cerebral Palsy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Objective. Pain and deficits in somatosensory processing seem to play a relevant role in cerebral palsy (CP). Rehabilitation techniques based on neuroplasticity mechanisms may induce powerful changes in the organization of the primary somatosensory cortex and have been proved to reduce levels of pain and discomfort in neurological pathologies. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions for pain sensitivity in CP individuals. Methods. Adults with cerebral palsy participated in the study and were randomly assigned to (...)
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  7. Hubert R. Dinse Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth, Tobias Kalisch, Sören Peters, Martin Tegenthoff (2012). Long-Term Sensory Stimulation Therapy Improves Hand Function and Restores Cortical Responsiveness in Patients with Chronic Cerebral Lesions. Three Single Case Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment resulting from cerebral lesion (CL) utilizes task specific training and massed practice to drive reorganization and sensorimotor improvement due to induction of neuroplasticity mechanisms. Loss of sensory abilities often complicates recovery, and thus the individual’s ability to use the affected body part for functional tasks. Therefore, the development of additional and alternative approaches that supplement, enhance, or even replace conventional training procedures would be advantageous. Repetitive sensory stimulation protocols (rSS) have been shown to evoke sensorimotor (...)
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  8. Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth, Tobias Kalisch, Sören Peters, Martin Tegenthoff & Hubert R. Dinse (2012). Long-Term Sensory Stimulation Therapy Improves Hand Function and Restores Cortical Responsiveness in Patients with Chronic Cerebral Lesions. Three Single Case Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment resulting from cerebral lesion (CL) utilizes task specific training and massed practice to drive reorganization and sensorimotor improvement due to induction of neuroplasticity mechanisms. Loss of sensory abilities often complicates recovery, and thus the individual’s ability to use the affected body part for functional tasks. Therefore, the development of additional and alternative approaches that supplement, enhance, or even replace conventional training procedures would be advantageous. Repetitive sensory stimulation protocols (rSS) have been shown to evoke sensorimotor (...)
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  9. B. Kolb, G. C. Teskey & R. Gibb (2009). Factors Influencing Cerebral Plasticity in the Normal and Injured Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:204-204.score: 24.0
    An important development in behavioural neuroscience in the past 20 years has been the demonstration that it is possible to stimulate functional recovery after cerebral injury in laboratory animals. Rodent models of cerebral injury provide an important tool for developing such rehabilitation programs. The models include analysis at different levels including detailed behavioural paradigms, electrophysiology, neuronal morphology, protein chemistry, and epigenetics. A significant challenge for the next 20 years will be the translation of this work to improve the (...)
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  10. Lucina Q. Uddin, Jan Rayman & Eran Zaidel (2005). Split-Brain Reveals Separate but Equal Self-Recognition in the Two Cerebral Hemispheres. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):633-640.score: 21.0
  11. Dan Ryder & Oleg Favorov (2001). The New Associationism: A Neural Explanation of the Predictive Powers of the Cerebral Cortex. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 2 (2):161-194.score: 21.0
    The ability to predict is the most importantability of the brain. Somehow, the cortex isable to extract regularities from theenvironment and use those regularities as abasis for prediction. This is a most remarkableskill, considering that behaviourallysignificant environmental regularities are noteasy to discern: they operate not only betweenpairs of simple environmental conditions, astraditional associationism has assumed, butamong complex functions of conditions that areorders of complexity removed from raw sensoryinputs. We propose that the brain's basicmechanism for discovering such complexregularities is implemented in (...)
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  12. Lawrence H. Davis (1997). Cerebral Hemispheres. Philosophical Studies 87 (2):207-22.score: 21.0
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  13. Marcel Kinsbourne (2000). How is Consciousness Expressed in the Cerebral Activation Manifold? Brain and Mind 1 (2):265-74.score: 21.0
    I dispute that consciousness is generated by core circuitry in the forebrain, with predominance of motor areas, as Cotterillproposes in Enchanted Looms and other theorists do also. Ipropose instead that conscious contents are the momentary modeof action of the integrated cortical field, expressed as a point vector ( dominant focus ), to which, in varying degree, allsectors of the network contribute. Consciousness is the brain''saccess to its own activity space, and is identical with the moment''sdominant mode of activity. The dominant (...)
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  14. Mike Brügger, Dominik A. Ettlin, Michael Meier, Thierry Keller, Roger Luechinger, Ashley Barlow, Sandro Palla, Lutz Jäncke & Kai Lutz (2011). Taking Sides with Pain – Lateralization Aspects Related to Cerebral Processing of Dental Pain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 21.0
    The current fMRI study investigated cortical processing of electrically induced painful tooth stimulation of both maxillary canines and central incisors in 21 healthy, right handed volunteers. A constant current, 150% above tooth specific pain-perception thresholds was applied and corresponding online ratings of perceived pain intensity were recorded with a computerized visual analog scale during fMRI measurements. Lateralization of cortical activations was investigated by a region of interest analysis. A wide cortical network distributed over several areas, typically described as the pain (...)
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  15. S. I. Franz (1933). The Inadequacy of the Concept of Unilateral Cerebral Dominance in Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (6):873.score: 21.0
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  16. J. A. Gengerelli (1948). Apparent Movement in Relation to Homonymous and Heteronymous Stimulation of the Cerebral Hemispheres. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):592.score: 21.0
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  17. G. A. Kelly (1935). Some Observations on the Relation of the Principle of Physiological Polarity and Symmetry and the Doctrine of Cerebral Dominance to the Perception of Symbols. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (2):202.score: 21.0
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  18. J. R. Knott (1939). Some Effects of 'Mental Set' on the Electrophysiological Processes of the Human Cerebral Cortex. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (4):384.score: 21.0
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  19. J. W. Nygard (1939). Cerebral Circulation Prevailing During Sleep and Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):1.score: 21.0
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  20. Karl U. Smith (1947). Bilateral Integrative Action of the Cerebral Cortex in Man in Verbal Association and Sensori-Motor Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):367.score: 21.0
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  21. Alberto Barbieri, Cristina Pinna, Gian Paolo Basso, Rosella Molinari, Enrico Giuliani, Luca Fruggeri & Massimo Nolli (2009). Specificity and Reliability of Prognostic Indexes in Intensive Care Evaluation: The Spontaneous Cerebral Haemorrhage Case. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):242-245.score: 21.0
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  22. Shepherd Ivory Franz (1916). On Certain Fluctuations in Cerebral Function in Aphasics. Journal of Experimental Psychology 1 (4):355.score: 21.0
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  23. H. H. Jasper, C. S. Bridgman & L. Carmichael (1937). An Ontogenetic Study of Cerebral Electrical Potentials in the Guinea Pig. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):63.score: 21.0
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  24. Michihiko Koeda, Hidehiko Takahashi, Masato Matsuura, Kunihiko Asai & Yoshiro Okubo (2013). Cerebral Responses to Vocal Attractiveness and Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia: A Functional MRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  25. D. B. Lindsley (1940). Bilateral Differences in Brain Potentials From the Two Cerebral Hemispheres in Relation to Laterality and Stuttering. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):211.score: 21.0
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  26. A. L. Loomis, E. N. Harvey & G. A. Hobart (1937). Cerebral States During Sleep, as Studied by Human Brain Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (2):127.score: 21.0
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  27. F. O. Smith (1938). An Experimental Study of the Reaction Time of the Cerebral Hemispheres in Relation to Handedness and Eyedness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (1):75.score: 21.0
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  28. Janniko R. Georgiadis (2012). Doing It . . . Wild? On the Role of the Cerebral Cortex in Human Sexual Activity. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Background: We like to think about sexual activity as something fixed, basic and primal. However, this does not seem to fully capture reality. Even when we relish sex, we may be capable of mentalizing, talking, voluntarily postponing orgasm, and much more. This might indicate that the central control mechanisms of sexual activity are quite flexible and susceptible to learning mechanisms, and that cortical brain areas play a critical part. Objective: This study aimed to identify those cortical areas and mechanisms most (...)
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  29. Timothy J. Crow (2005). The Cerebral Torque and Directional Asymmetry for Hand Use Are Correlates of the Capacity for Language in Homo Sapiens. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):595-596.score: 18.0
    The claim of consistent hemispheric specialisations across classes of chordates is undermined by the absence of population-based directional asymmetry of paw/hand use in rodents and primates. No homologue of the cerebral torque from right frontal to left occipital has been established in a nonhuman species. The null hypothesis that the torque is the sapiens-specific neural basis of language has not been disproved.
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  30. Eike-Henner W. Kluge (1984). Cerebral Death. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (2).score: 18.0
    The notion of cerebral death is examined in relation to those of cardiopulmonary and whole-brain death. It is argued that rather than being a new concept of death, it is merely a new criterion that leaves the old concept — death as loss of personhood — intact. The argument begins on a theoretical level with the distinction between criteria and concepts, places both into context with the notion of a conceptual framework in its relation to empirical reality, and then (...)
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  31. William H. Calvin (1996). The Cerebral Code. MIT Press.score: 18.0
    In "The Cerebral Code," he has solidly embedded his ideas in experimental neurophysiology and neuropharmacology, deriving from his decades in the laboratory.
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  32. R. W. Kentridge (1999). When is Information Represented Explicitly in Blindsight and Cerebral Achromatopsia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):156-157.score: 18.0
    Discrimination of forms defined solely by color and discrimination of hue are dissociated in cerebral achromatopsia. Both must be based on potentially explicit information derived from differentially color-sensitive photoreceptors, yet only one gives rise to phenomenal experience of color. By analogy, visual information may be used to form explicit representations for action without giving rise to any phenomenal experience other than that of making the action.
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  33. N. Galldiks, A. Thiel, C. Haense, G. R. Fink & R. Hilker (2008). 11 C-Flumazenil Positron Emission Tomography Demonstrates Reduction of Both Global and Local Cerebral Benzodiazepine Receptor Binding in a Patient with Stiff Person Syndrome. Journal of Neurology 255 (9).score: 18.0
    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune disorder associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-Ab), the key enzyme in γ -aminobutyric acid synthesis (GABA). In order to investigate the role of cerebral benzodiazepinereceptor binding in SPS, we performed [ 11 C]flumazenil (FMZ) positron emission tomography (PET) in a female patient with SPS compared to nine healthy controls. FMZ is a radioligand to the postsynaptic (...)
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  34. Yves Burnod (1991). Organizational Levels of the Cerebral Cortex: An Integrated Model. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4).score: 18.0
    We propose a theoretical model of the cerebral cortex which is based on its cellular components and integrates its different levels of organization: (1) cells have general adaptive and memorization properties; (2) cortical columns are repetitive interneuronal circuits which determine an adaptive processing specific to the cerebral cortex; (3) cortical maps effect selective combinations which are very efficient to learn basic behaviourial adaptations such as invariant recognition of forms, visually-guided hand movements, or execution of structured motor programs; (4) (...)
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  35. Arnaud Destrebecqz, Philippe Peigneux, Steven Laureys, Christian Degueldre, Guy Del Fiore, Joel Aerts, Andre Luxen, Martial van der Linden, Axel Cleeremans & Pierre Maquet (2003). Cerebral Correlates of Explicit Sequence Learning. Cognitive Brain Research 16 (3):391-398.score: 18.0
    Using positron emission tomography (PET) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements, we investigated the cerebral correlates of consciousness in a sequence learning task through a novel application of the Process Dissociation Procedure, a behavioral paradigm that makes it possible to separately assess conscious and unconscious contributions to performance. Results show that the metabolic response in the anterior cingulate / mesial prefrontal cortex (ACC / MPFC) is exclusively and specifically correlated with the explicit component of performance during recollection (...)
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  36. Onur Güntürkün (2005). Darwin's Legacy and the Evolution of Cerebral Asymmetries. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):599-600.score: 18.0
    Vallortigara & Rogers (V&R) assume that the alignment of escape responses in gregarious species is the central evolutionary organizer of a wide range of cerebral asymmetries. Although it is indeed likely that the benefits of a population asymmetry in social species outweigh its costs, it is hard to see (a) why the population should not oscillate between two subgroups with mirror-image asymmetries, (b) why solitary animals should keep their inherited population asymmetry despite a resulting fitness reduction, and (c) and (...)
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  37. Jechil Sieratzki & Bencie Woll (2005). Cerebral Asymmetry: From Survival Strategies to Social Behaviour. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):613-614.score: 18.0
    We describe a possible link between coordinated lateralised group behaviour serving species survival in lower vertebrates and a striking lateralisation phenomenon found in human social behaviour: the universal preference for cradling a young infant on the left side. Our exploration offers a different perspective on the role of cerebral asymmetry for the survival of both the individual and the species.
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  38. Stefan Geyer, Marcel Weiss, Katja Reimann, Gabriele Lohmann & Robert Turner (2011). Microstructural Parcellation of the Human Cerebral Cortex – From Brodmann's Post-Mortem Map to in Vivo Mapping with High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 18.0
    The year 2009 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the famous brain map of Korbinian Brodmann. Although a "classic" guide to microanatomical parcellation of the cerebral cortex, it is – from today's state-of-the-art neuroimaging perspective – problematic to use Brodmann's map as a structural guide to functional units in the cortex. In this article we discuss some of the reasons, especially the problematic compatibility of the "post-mortem world" of microstructural brain maps with the "in vivo world" of (...)
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  39. and Paul J. Laurienti Jennifer L. Mozolic, Satoru Hayasaka (2010). A Cognitive Training Intervention Increases Resting Cerebral Blood Flow in Healthy Older Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    Healthy aging is typically accompanied by some decline in cognitive performance, as well as by alterations in brain structure and function. Here we report the results of a randomized, controlled trial designed to determine the effects of a novel cognitive training program on resting cerebral blood flow and gray matter volume in healthy older adults. Sixty-six healthy older adults participated in eight weeks of either a training program targeting attention and distractibility or an educational control program. This training program (...)
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  40. Robert William Kentridge (2007). Incomplete Stimulus Representations and the Loss of Cognitive Access in Cerebral Achromatopsia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):508-509.score: 18.0
    When processing of stimuli occurs without attention, phenomenal experience, as well as cognitive access, may be lost. Sensory representations are, however, constructed by neural machinery extending far beyond sensory receptors. In conditions such as cerebral achromatopsia incomplete sensory representations may still elicit phenomenal experience but these representations might be too aberrant to be integrated into the wider cognitive workspace.
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  41. Clara Eline James (2012). Music and Language Processing Share Behavioral and Cerebral Features. Frontiers in Psychology 3:52.score: 18.0
    Music and Language Processing Share Behavioral and Cerebral Features.
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  42. E. A. Maguire (1997). The Cerebral Representation of Space: Insights From Functional Imaging Data. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):62-68.score: 18.0
    Functional imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, present a unique opportunity to examine, in humans, the cerebral representation of space in vivo. Space is ubiquitous and not a unitary phenomenon, and the brain uses visual, vestibular and proprioceptive inputs to produce multiple representations of space subserving spatial cognition, ranging from gaze control to remembering multiple complex large-scale environments. Functional imaging studies have shown the importance of the parietal cortex in perceptual, motor, attention and (...)
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  43. Robert Sweet, Kenneth N. Fish & David Lewis (2010). Mapping Synaptic Pathology Within Cerebral Cortical Circuits in Subjects with Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:44.score: 18.0
    Converging lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia is characterized by impairments of synaptic machinery within cerebral cortical circuits. Efforts to localize these alterations in brain tissue from subjects with schizophrenia have frequently been limited to the quantification of structures that are non-selectively identified (e.g. dendritic spines labeled in Golgi preparations, axon boutons labeled with synaptophysin), or to quantification of proteins using methods unable to resolve relevant cellular compartments. Multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy represents a means to circumvent many of (...)
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  44. Axel Cleeremans, Learned Material Content and Acquisition Level Modulate Cerebral Reactivation During Posttraining Rapid-Eye-Movements Sleep.score: 18.0
    We have previously shown that several brain areas are activated both during sequence learning at wake and during subsequent rapid-eye-movements (REM) sleep (Nat. Neurosci. 3 (2000) 831– 836), suggesting that REM sleep participates in the reprocessing of recent memory traces in humans. However, the nature of the reprocessed information remains open. Here, we show that regional cerebral reactivation during posttraining REM sleep is not merely related to the acquisition of basic visuomotor skills during prior practice of the serial reaction (...)
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  45. T. J. Crow (1996). All Sex Differences in Cognitive Ability May Be Explained by an X-Y Homologous Gene Determining Degrees of Cerebral Asymmetry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):249-250.score: 18.0
    Male superiority in mathematical ability (along with female superiority in verbal fluency) may reflect the operation of an X-Y homologous gene (the right-shift-factor) influencing the relative rates of development of the cerebral hemispheres. Alleles at the locus on the Y chromosome will be selected at a later mean age than alleles on the X, and only by females.
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  46. Kara D. Federmeier Edward W. Wlotko (2013). Two Sides of Meaning: The Scalp-Recorded N400 Reflects Distinct Contributions From the Cerebral Hemispheres. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The N400, a component of the event-related potential (ERP) associated with the processing of meaning, is sensitive to a wide array of lexico-semantic, sentence-level, and discourse-level manipulations across modalities. In sentence contexts, N400 amplitude varies inversely and nearly linearly with the predictability of a word in its context. However, recent theories and empirical evidence from studies employing the visual half-field technique (to selectively bias processing to one cerebral hemisphere) suggest that the two hemispheres use sentence context information in different (...)
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  47. William O'Grady (2000). Language, Mathematics, and Cerebral Distinctness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):45-45.score: 18.0
    The cerebral distinctness of the linguistic and mathematical faculties does not entail their functional independence. Approaches to language that posit a common foundation for the two make claims about design features, not location, and are thus not affected by the finding that one ability can be spared by a neurological accident that compromises the other.
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  48. Christophe Phillips, The Effect of Clonidine Infusion on Distribution of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Volunteers.score: 18.0
    BACKGROUND: Through their action on the locus coeruleus, ␣ 2-adrenoceptor agonists induce rapidly reversible sedation while partially preserving cognitive brain functions. Our goal in this observational study was to map brain regions whose activity is modified by clonidine infusion so as to better understand its loci of action, especially in relation to sedation. METHODS: Six ASA I–II right-handed volunteers were recruited. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was monitored continuously. After a baseline H215O activation scan, clonidine infusion was started at a rate ranging from (...)
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  49. Glenn Austin, W. Hayward & S. Rouhe (1974). A Note on the Problem of Conscious Man and Cerebral Disconnection by Hemispherectomy. In Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.), Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C.score: 18.0
     
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  50. George Austin, William Hayward & Stanley Rouhe (1974). A Note on the Problem of Conscious Man and Cerebral Disconnection by Hemispherectomy. In Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.), Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C. 95.score: 18.0
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