Search results for 'Cerebral Cortex' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. R. Knott (1939). Some Effects of 'Mental Set' on the Electrophysiological Processes of the Human Cerebral Cortex. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (4):384.score: 150.0
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  2. Karl U. Smith (1947). Bilateral Integrative Action of the Cerebral Cortex in Man in Verbal Association and Sensori-Motor Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):367.score: 150.0
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  3. Janniko R. Georgiadis (2012). Doing It . . . Wild? On the Role of the Cerebral Cortex in Human Sexual Activity. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.score: 120.0
    Background: We like to think about sexual activity as something fixed, basic and primal. However, this does not seem to fully capture reality. Even when we relish sex, we may be capable of mentalizing, talking, voluntarily postponing orgasm, and much more. This might indicate that the central control mechanisms of sexual activity are quite flexible and susceptible to learning mechanisms, and that cortical brain areas play a critical part. Objective: This study aimed to identify those cortical areas and mechanisms most (...)
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  4. Yves Burnod (1991). Organizational Levels of the Cerebral Cortex: An Integrated Model. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4).score: 120.0
    We propose a theoretical model of the cerebral cortex which is based on its cellular components and integrates its different levels of organization: (1) cells have general adaptive and memorization properties; (2) cortical columns are repetitive interneuronal circuits which determine an adaptive processing specific to the cerebral cortex; (3) cortical maps effect selective combinations which are very efficient to learn basic behaviourial adaptations such as invariant recognition of forms, visually-guided hand movements, or execution of structured motor (...)
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  5. Stefan Geyer, Marcel Weiss, Katja Reimann, Gabriele Lohmann & Robert Turner (2011). Microstructural Parcellation of the Human Cerebral Cortex – From Brodmann's Post-Mortem Map to in Vivo Mapping with High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
    The year 2009 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the famous brain map of Korbinian Brodmann. Although a "classic" guide to microanatomical parcellation of the cerebral cortex, it is – from today's state-of-the-art neuroimaging perspective – problematic to use Brodmann's map as a structural guide to functional units in the cortex. In this article we discuss some of the reasons, especially the problematic compatibility of the "post-mortem world" of microstructural brain maps with the "in vivo (...)
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  6. Bjorn Merker (2007). Consciousness Without a Cerbral Cortex: A Challenge for Neuroscience and Medicine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):63-81.score: 108.0
    A broad range of evidence regarding the functional organization of the vertebrate brain – spanning from comparative neurology to experimental psychology and neurophysiology to clinical data – is reviewed for its bearing on conceptions of the neural organization of consciousness. A novel principle relating target selection, action selection, and motivation to one another, as a means to optimize integration for action in real time, is introduced. With its help, the principal macrosystems of the vertebrate brain can be seen to form (...)
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  7. Dan Ryder & Oleg Favorov (2001). The New Associationism: A Neural Explanation of the Predictive Powers of the Cerebral Cortex. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 2 (2):161-194.score: 108.0
    The ability to predict is the most importantability of the brain. Somehow, the cortex isable to extract regularities from theenvironment and use those regularities as abasis for prediction. This is a most remarkableskill, considering that behaviourallysignificant environmental regularities are noteasy to discern: they operate not only betweenpairs of simple environmental conditions, astraditional associationism has assumed, butamong complex functions of conditions that areorders of complexity removed from raw sensoryinputs. We propose that the brain's basicmechanism for discovering such complexregularities is implemented (...)
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  8. Jun Wang, Gregory Dam, Sule Yildirim, William Rand, Uri Wilensky & James C. Houk (2008). Reciprocity Between the Cerebellum and the Cerebral Cortex: Nonlinear Dynamics in Microscopic Modules for Generating Voluntary Motor Commands. Complexity 14 (2):29-45.score: 102.0
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  9. Barry J. Sessle & Dongyuan Yao (2002). Contribution of Plasticity of Sensorimotor Cerebral Cortex to Development of Communication Skills. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):638-639.score: 96.0
    Several lines of evidence have underscored the remarkable neuroplasticity of the primate sensorimotor cortex, characterizing these cortical areas as dynamic constructs that are modelled in a use-dependent manner by behaviourally significant experiences. Their plasticity likely provides a neural substrate that may contribute to the dynamic systems paradigm argued by Shanker & King (S&K) as crucial for development of communication skills.
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  10. H. B. Barlow (1985). Cerebral Cortex as Model Builder. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 37--46.score: 96.0
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  11. David B. Edelman (2007). Consciousness Without Corticocentrism: Beating an Evolutionary Path. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):91-92.score: 90.0
    Merker's approach allows the formulation of an evolutionary view of consciousness that abandons a dependence on structural homology – in this case, the presence of a cerebral cortex – in favor of functional concordance. In contrast to Merker, though, I maintain that the emergence of complex, dynamic interactions, such as those which occur between thalamus and cortex, was central to the appearance of consciousness. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  12. Walter J. Freeman (2007). Roles of Allocortex and Centrencephalon in Intentionality and Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):92-93.score: 90.0
    “Decortication” does not distinguish between removing all cerebral cortex, including three-layered allocortex or just six-layered neocortex. Functional decortication, by spreading depression, reversibly suppresses only neocortex, leaving minimal intentionality. Removal of all forebrain structures except a hypothalamic “island” blocks all intentional behaviors, leaving only tropisms. To what extent do Merker's examples retain allocortex, and how might such residues affect his interpretations? (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  13. Rick Grush, Blending in Language, Conceptual Structure, and the Cerebral Cortex.score: 90.0
    0. Introduction The past decade has seen Cognitive Linguistics (CL) emerge as an important, exciting and promising theoretical alternative to Chomskyan approaches to the study of language. Even so, sheer numbers and institutional inertia make it the case that most current neurolinguistic research either assumes that the Chomskyan formalist story is more or less correct (and thus that the task of neurolinguistics is to determine how the brain implements GB, for instance), or that the there are two possibilities, Chomskyanism or (...)
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  14. William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2003). Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.score: 90.0
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical regions that (...)
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  15. William A. Phillips & Wolf Singer (1997). In Search of Common Foundations for Cortical Computation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):657-683.score: 90.0
    It is worthwhile to search for forms of coding, processing, and learning common to various cortical regions and cognitive functions. Local cortical processors may coordinate their activity by maximizing the transmission of information coherently related to the context in which it occurs, thus forming synchronized population codes. This coordination involves contextual field (CF) connections that link processors within and between cortical regions. The effects of CF connections are distinguished from those mediating receptive field (RF) input; it is shown how CFs (...)
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  16. Johan Eriksson, Anne Larsson, Katrine Riklund Åhlström & Lars Nyberg (2007). Similar Frontal and Distinct Posterior Cortical Regions Mediate Visual and Auditory Perceptual Awareness. Cerebral Cortex 17 (4):760-765.score: 90.0
  17. Daniel Collerton & Elaine Perry (2004). Thalamocortical Dysfunction and Complex Visual Hallucinations in Brain Disease – Are the Primary Disturbances in the Cerebral Cortex? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):789-790.score: 90.0
    Applying Behrendt & Young's (B&Y's) model of thalamocortical synchrony to complex visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative disorders, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and progressive supranuclear palsy, leads us to propose that the primary pathology may be cortical rather than thalamic. Additionally, the extinction of active hallucinations by eye closure challenges their conception of the role of reduced sensory input.
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  18. Daniel A. Pollen (2003). Explicit Neural Representations, Recursive Neural Networks and Conscious Visual Perception. Cerebral Cortex 13 (8):807-814.score: 90.0
  19. Henry Maudsley (1890). The Cerebral Cortex and its Work. Mind 15 (58):161-190.score: 90.0
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  20. P. E. Roland (1978). Sensory Feedback to the Cerebral Cortex During Voluntary Movement in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129.score: 90.0
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  21. Vania Broccoli (1999). Evolutionary Developmental Biology of the Cerebral Cortex. Bioessays 21 (11):974-977.score: 90.0
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  22. Javier DeFelipe, Inmaculada Ballesteros-Yáñez, Maria Carmen Inda & Alberto Muñoz (2006). Double-Bouquet Cells in the Monkey and Human Cerebral Cortex with Special Reference to Areas 17 and 18. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J.-M. Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 15-32.score: 90.0
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  23. Sonia Garel & John Lr Rubenstein (2004). 5 Patterning of the Cerebral Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press.score: 90.0
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  24. P. E. Roland (1978). The Cerebral Cortex and Conscious Kinaesthetic and Tensional Information. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):167.score: 90.0
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  25. Jon Mallatt Todd E. Feinberg (2013). The Evolutionary and Genetic Origins of Consciousness in the Cambrian Period Over 500 Million Years Ago. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    Vertebrates evolved in the Cambrian Period before 520 million years ago, but we do not know when or how consciousness arose in the history of the vertebrate brain. Here we propose multiple levels of isomorphic or somatotopic neural representations as an objective marker for sensory consciousness. All extant vertebrates have these, so we deduce that consciousness extends back to the group’s origin. The first conscious sense may have been vision. Then vision, coupled with additional sensory systems derived from ectodermal placodes (...)
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  26. A. C. Webb (1970). Consciousness and the Cerebral Cortex. British Journal of Anaesthesia 55:209-19.score: 90.0
  27. Robert A. Crozier, Benjamin D. Philpot, Nathaniel B. Sawtell & Mark F. Bear (2004). 8 Long-Term Plasticity of Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission in the Cerebral Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press.score: 90.0
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  28. Bruno [Y.] Eduardo Césarman Estañol (1995). Localization of Function in the Cerebral Cortex and the Unity and Self-Organization of the Brain. Ludus Vitalis 3 (5):181-191.score: 90.0
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  29. David LaBerge & Ray Kasevich (2013). The Cognitive Significance of Resonating Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1523-1550.score: 90.0
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  30. John Hr Maunsell & Geoffrey M. Ghose (2004). О Dynamics of Attentional Modulation in Visual Cerebral Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press.score: 90.0
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  31. Shane M. O'Mara (1996). The Cerebellum and Cerebral Cortex: Contrasting and Converging Contributions to Spatial Navigation and Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):469-470.score: 90.0
    Thach's target article presents a remarkable overview and integration of animal and human studies on the functions of the cerebellum and makes clear theoretical predictions for both the normal operation of the cerebellum and for the effects of cerebellar lesions in the mature human. Commentary is provided on three areas, namely, spatial navigation, implicit learning, and cerebellar agenesis to elicit further development of the themes already present in Thach's paper, [THACH].
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  32. Pasko Rakic, A. N. G. Sbc & Joshua Breunig (2004). 3 Setting the Stage for Cognition: Genesis of the Primate Cerebral Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press. 33.score: 90.0
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  33. E. Ramon-Moliner (1978). Two Basic Neuronal Configurations in the Cerebral Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):502.score: 90.0
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  34. Nancy J. Woolf (2006). Microtubules in the Cerebral Cortex: Role in Memory and Consciousness. In. In J. Tuszynski (ed.), The Emerging Physics of Consciousness. Springer-Verlag. 49--94.score: 90.0
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  35. M. N. Zhadin (1996). Rhythmicity in the EEG and Global Stabilization of the Average Level of Excitation in the Cerebral Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):309.score: 90.0
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  36. Andreea C. Bostan, Richard P. Dum & Peter L. Strick (2013). Cerebellar Networks with the Cerebral Cortex and Basal Ganglia. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (5):241-254.score: 90.0
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  37. V. Braitenberg (1986). Two Views of the Cerebral Cortex. In. In G. Palm & A. Aertsen (eds.), Brain Theory. Springer. 81--96.score: 90.0
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  38. S. H. Cardoso (forthcoming). Division of the Cerebral Cortex Into Lobes. Brain and Mind.score: 90.0
     
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  39. David P. Carey (1997). Vision and Movement Mechanisms in the Cerebral Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (6):237-237.score: 90.0
     
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  40. W. Duch (1997). Yves Burnod, An Adaptive Neural Network: The Cerebral Cortex. Minds and Machines 7:144-147.score: 90.0
  41. John C. Eccles (1987). The Effect of Silent Thinking on the Cerebral Cortex. In B. Gulyas (ed.), The Brain-Mind Problem: Philosophical and Neurophysiological Approaches. Leuven University Press.score: 90.0
  42. A. Granato (2005). Physiology of the Cerebral Cortex: Reduction Versus Emergence. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 97 (2):197-210.score: 90.0
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  43. Scheich H. (2008). Spatial Patterns of Neuronal Activity in Rat Cerebral Cortex During Slow-Wave Sleep - a Single-Cell Resolution Metabolic Mapping Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
  44. David H. Ingvar (1979). II Patterns of Activity II in the Cerebral Cortex II Related to Memory Functions. In L. Nilsson (ed.), Perspectives on Memory Research. 247.score: 90.0
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  45. N. Kleitman (1955). The Role of the Cerebral Cortex in the Development and Maintenance of Consciousness. In H. A. Abramson (ed.), Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.score: 90.0
     
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  46. Björn Merker (2008). Consciousness Without a Cerebral Cortex. In Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.), Consciousness Transitions: Phylogenetic, Ontogenetic, and Physiological Aspects. Elsevier.score: 90.0
     
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  47. J. A. Nunn & L. J. Gregory (2005). Ffytche, DH (2002). Neural Codes Forconsciousvision. Trends inCognitiveScience, 6, 493–495. Ffytche, DH, Guy, CN, & Zeki, S.(1995). The Parallel Visual Motion Inputs Into Areas V1 and V5 of Human Cerebral Cortex. Brain, 118, 1375–1394. Ffytche, DH, Howard, RJ, Brammer, MJ, David, A., Woodruff, P., & Williams, S.(1998). The Anatomy of Conscious Vision: An fMRI Study of Visual Halluci. [REVIEW] In Robertson, C. L. & N. Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 57--144.score: 90.0
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  48. PhD Okamoto, Hidehiko M. D., Henning PhD Teismann, Ryusuke Kakigi & Christo PhD Pantev (2012). Auditory Evoked Fields Elicited by Spectral, Temporal, and Spectral-Temporal Changes in Human Cerebral Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 3 (2012).score: 90.0
    Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral-temporal change were very similar to those (...)
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  49. R. D. Orpwood (1994). A Possible Neural Mechanism Underlying Consciousness Based on the Pattern Processing Capabilities of Pyramidal Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex. Journal of Theoretical Biology 169:403-18.score: 90.0
  50. Wilder Penfield (1954). Studies of the Cerebral Cortex of Man: A Review and an Interpretation. In J. F. Delafresnaye (ed.), Brain Mechanisms and Consciousness. Blackwell. 284--309.score: 90.0
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