Search results for 'Cerwyn Moore' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Cerwyn Moore & Chris Farrands (eds.) (2010). International Relations Theory and Philosophy: Interpretive Dialogues. Routledge.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Cerwyn Moore (2010). 5 Jan Patočka and Global Politics. In Cerwyn Moore & Chris Farrands (eds.), International Relations Theory and Philosophy: Interpretive Dialogues. Routledge. 80--46.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael S. Moore (2012). Moore's Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.score: 210.0
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. G. E. Moore (1993). G.E. Moore: Selected Writings. Routledge.score: 210.0
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. G. E. Moore, Moore's Margin Notes on Reid.score: 180.0
  6. G. E. Moore (1959). G. E. Moore. Mind 68 (269):1-1.score: 180.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. S. Moore (2001). In What Follows, We Shall Bring Out as Clearly as Possible These Points of Similarities That Moore's Thinking on Goodness Have with Phenomenological Thinking on Values. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28:N0 - 2.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Barbara M. Kinach & Carol A. Moore (1991). Kinach/Moore Bibliography (From Page 7). Inquiry 8 (2):13-13.score: 180.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. G. E. Moore (1986). G.E. Moore: The Early Essays. Temple University Press.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. A. W. Moore (1990/2002). The Infinite. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This historical study of the infinite covers all its aspects from the mathematical to the mystical. Anyone who has ever pondered the limitlessness of space and time, or the endlessness of numbers, or the perfection of God will recognize the special fascination of the subject. Beginning with an entertaining account of the main paradoxes of the infinite, including those of Zeno, A.W. Moore traces the history of the topic from Aristotle to Kant, Hegel, Cantor, and Wittgenstein.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. G. E. Moore (1903/2004). Principia Ethica. Dover Publications.score: 60.0
    First published in 1903, this volume revolutionized philosophy and forever altered the direction of ethical studies. A philosopher’s philosopher, G. E. Moore was the idol of the Bloomsbury group, and Lytton Strachey declared that Principia Ethica marked the rebirth of the Age of Reason. This work clarifies some of moral philosophy’s most common confusions and redefines the science’s terminology. Six chapters explore: the subject matter of ethics, naturalistic ethics, hedonism, metaphysical ethics, ethics in relation to conduct, and the ideal. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Andrew Moore & Roger Crisp (1996). Welfarism in Moral Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (4):598 – 613.score: 60.0
    We take welfarism in moral theory to be the claim that the well-being of individuals matters and is the only consideration that fundamentally matters, from a moral point of view. We argue that criticisms of welfarism due to G.E. Moore, Donald Regan, Charles Taylor and Amartya Sen all fail. The final section of our paper is a critical survey of the problems which remain for welfarists in moral theory.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. A. W. Moore (1987). Points of View. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (146):1-20.score: 60.0
    A. W. Moore argues in this bold, unusual, and ambitious book that it is possible to think about the world from no point of view. His argument involves discussion of a very wide range of fundamental philosophical issues, including the nature of persons, the subject-matter of mathematics, realism and anti-realism, value, the inexpressible, and God. The result is a powerful critique of our own finitude.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. A. W. Moore (2003). Ineffability and Nonsense. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169–193.score: 60.0
    [A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes (non-trivially) serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. G. E. Moore (2005). Ethics: The Nature of Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.score: 60.0
    G. E. Moore's 1912 work Ethics has tended to be overshadowed by his famous earlier work Principia Ethica. However, its detailed discussions of utilitarianism, free will, and the objectivity of moral judgements find no real counterpart in Principia, while its account of right and wrong and of the nature of intrinsic value deepen our understanding of Moore's moral philosophy. Moore himself regarded the book highly, writing late in his career, "I myself like [it] better (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Terence Moore (2009). Locke's Parrot. Think 8 (23):35-44.score: 60.0
    In this their fourth conversation the 17th century philosopher, John Locke and the 21st century linguist, Terence Moore, consider a question not fully answered even today: what might count as the key distinction beween man and animals, or in Locke's phrase what In the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke considers two possible linguistic candidates: the ability to use language appropriately, and the ability to . As Locke and Moore explore these possibilities they come to see that the distinction (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. A. W. Moore (2003). Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kant's Moral and Religious Philosophy. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this bold and innovative new work, Adrian Moore provides a refreshing but challenging new interpretation of Kant's moral philosophy and argues that it can enrich our understanding of a central problem in contemporary ethical debate: the problem of rationality. Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty is essential reading for all those interested in Kant, ethics and philosophy of religion.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Terence Moore (2008). Locke: An Empiricist? Think 7 (20):97-104.score: 60.0
    Terence Moore explains why Locke is perhaps not quite the many suppose him to be.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Simon C. Moore (ed.) (2002). Emotional Cognition: From Brain to Behaviour. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.score: 60.0
    CHAPTER Emotional Cognition An introduction Simon C. Moore and Mike Oaksford There has been a marked shift in the perceived role of emotion in human ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Gregory Moore (2002). Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Nietzsche, Biology and Metaphor explores the German philosopher's response to the intellectual debates sparked by the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. By examining the abundance of biological metaphors in Nietzsche's writings, Gregory Moore questions his recent reputation as an eminently subversive and (post) modern thinker, and shows how deeply Nietzsche was immersed in late nineteenth-century debates on evolution, degeneration and race. The first part of the book provides a detailed study and new interpretation of Nietzsche's much disputed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Geoff Moore (2005). Corporate Character. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):659-685.score: 60.0
    This paper is a further development of two previous pieces of work (Moore 2002, 2005) in which modern virtue ethics, and in particular MacIntyre’s (1985) related notions of “practice” and “institution,” have been explored in the context of business. It first introduces and defines the concept of corporate character and seeks to establish why it is important. It then reviews MacIntyre’s virtues-practice-institution schema and the implications of this at the level of the institution in question—the corporation—and argues that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Gerard Moore (2013). Baptism: Historical, Theological and Pastoral Perspectives [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (3):379.score: 60.0
    Moore, Gerard Review(s) of: Baptism: Historical, theological and pastoral perspectives, by Gordon L. Heath, and James D. Dvorak, eds, McMaster Divinity College Press Theological Study Series 4 (Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2011), pp.271, $44.95.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Andrew Moore (2003). Realism and Christian Faith: God, Grammar, and Meaning. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The question of realism - that is, whether God exists independently of human beings - is central to much contemporary theology and church life. It is also an important topic in the philosophy of religion. This book discusses the relationship between realism and Christian faith in a thorough and systematic way and uses the resources of both philosophy and theology to argue for a Christocentric narrative realism. Many previous defences of realism have attempted to model Christian belief on scientific theory (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Geoff Moore (2005). Humanizing Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):237-255.score: 60.0
    The paper begins by exploring whether a “tendency to avarice” exists in most capitalist business organisations. It concludes that it does and that this is problematic. The problem centres on the potential threat to the integrity of human character and the disablement of community.What, then, can be done about it? Building on previous work (Moore, 2002) in which MacIntyre’s notions of practice and institution were explored (MacIntyre, 1985), the paper offers a philosophically based argument in favour of the rediscovery (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Terence Moore (2013). Locke's Second 'Secret Reference'. Think 12 (33):25-35.score: 60.0
    Research Articles Terence Moore, Think , FirstView Article(s).
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Tangming Yuan, David Moore & Alec Grierson (2003). Computational Agents as a Test-Bed to Study the Philosophical Dialogue Model "DE": A Development of Mackenzie's DC. Informal Logic 23 (3).score: 60.0
    This paper reports research concerning a suitable dialogue model for human computer debate. In particular, we consider the adoption of Moore's (1993) utilization of Mackenzie's (1979) game DC, means of using computational agents as the test-bed to facilitate evaluation of the proposed model, and means of using the evaluation results as motivation to further develop a dialogue model, which can prevent fallacious argument and common errors. It is anticipated that this work will contribute toward the development of human computer (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gerard Moore (2012). It's the Eucharist, Thank God [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (1):125.score: 60.0
    Moore, Gerard Review(s) of: It's the Eucharist, thank god, by Maurice Taylor, Suffolk: Decani Books, 2009, pp.103.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Gerald Moore (2011). Politics of the Gift. Edinburgh University Press.score: 60.0
    Gerald Moore shows how the problematic of the gift drives and illuminates the last century of French philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. A. W. Moore (forthcoming). The English Language and Philosophy. Rue Descartes.score: 60.0
    Dans quelle mesure la philosophie du langage ordinaire, faite par des anglophones (usagers de l'English language,) qui réfléchissent sur la langue (language encore) et son usage correct, est-elle liée à l'anglais ? Ainsi, quand elle traite de la nature de la connaissance, se peut-il qu'il s'agisse de questions induites par le terme knowledge (connaissance/savoir) ? Adrian Moore instruit la cohérence d'une réponse négative à partir d'une réflexion sur le « nous » qui parle. Mais il voit dans l'impossibilité de (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Janet Folina & A. W. Moore (1991). The Infinite. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):348.score: 60.0
    Anyone who has pondered the limitlessness of space and time, or the endlessness of numbers, or the perfection of God will recognize the special fascination of this question. Adrian Moore's historical study of the infinite covers all its aspects, from the mathematical to the mystical.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. A. R. Moore (1977). Medical Humanities: An Aid to Ethical Discussions. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (1):26-32.score: 60.0
    'The ethical landscape', the title given to part of a course devised by Mr. Moore, is described in full in this paper. The whole course is a new adventure in medical education designed to help students to explore the ethical problems in the practice of medicine. The 'ethical landscape' is seen through discussion based on passages from literature depicting doctors' and patients' dilemmas. As the results summarized in the tables show, the students found the course well worth while, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Gerard Moore (2014). Sackcloth and Ashes: Penance and Penitence in a Self-Centred World. The Bloomsbury Lent Book 2014; Looking Through the Cross: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book 2014 [Book Review]. [REVIEW] Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):250.score: 60.0
    Moore, Gerard Review(s) of: Sackcloth and ashes: Penance and penitence in a self-centred world. The Bloomsbury lent book 2014, by Anne Widdecombe, London: Bloomsbury, 2013), pp. 181, $19.99; Looking through the cross: The archbishop of Canterbury's lent book 2014, by Graham Tomlin, (London: Bloomsbury, 2013), pp. 215, $24.99.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gerard Moore (2012). The Trinity: Insights From the Mystics [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (1):120.score: 60.0
    Moore, Gerard Review(s) of: The trinity: Insights from the mystics, by Anne Hunt, A Michael Glazier Book, Collegeville: Liturgical Press. 2010, pp.190, ISBN 9780814656921, $37.95.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Rowan Moore (2012). Why We Build. Picador.score: 60.0
    In Why We Build Rowan Moore shows how buildings are driven by human emotions and desires – such as hope, power, money, sex, and the idea of home – and how buildings then shape our experiences.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. George Edward Moore (1942). A Reply to My Critics. In Paul Arthur Schilpp (ed.), The Philosophy of G. E. Moore. Open Court.score: 60.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Donald J. Moore (1996). Martin Buber: Prophet of Religious Secularism. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    In this study of Martin Buber's life and work, Donald Moore focuses in on Buber's central message about what it means to be a human being and a person of faith.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ronald Moore (2007). Natural Beauty: A Theory of Aesthetics Beyond the Arts. Broadview Press.score: 60.0
    Natural Beauty presents a bold new philosophical account of the principles involved in making aesthetic judgments about natural objects. It surveys historical and modern accounts of natural beauty and weaves elements derived from those accounts into a "syncretic theory" that centers on key features of aesthetic experience—specifically, features that sustain and reward attention. In this way, Moore's theory sets itself apart from both the purely cognitive and the purely emotive approaches that have dominated natural aesthetics until now. Natural Beauty (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. G. E. Moore (1993). Selected Writings. Routledge.score: 60.0
    G. E. Moore was one of the most interesting and influential philosophers of the first half of the twentieth century. This selection of his writings makes the best of his work once again available, and also includes previously unpublished writings. Moore's first published writings, represented in this collection by his papers "The Nature of Judgment" and "The Refutation of Idealism," contributed decisively to the break with idealism which led to the development of analytic philosophy. Moore went on (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Gerard Moore (2014). The Billycart, the Boxing Tent, the Battle: Life with Haemophilia [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (3):378.score: 60.0
    Moore, Gerard Review(s) of: The Billycart, the boxing tent, the battle: Life with haemophilia, by Anne Kearney, (Bloomington IN: Xlibris, 2013) pp.59, ISBN 9781483662893, $36.99.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. G. E. Moore (1903). The Refutation of Idealism. Mind 12 (48):433-453.score: 30.0
  41. Asher Moore (1960). Chisholm on Intentionality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (December):248-254.score: 30.0
  42. Cathleen Moore (2001). Inattentional Blindness: Perception or Memory and What Does It Matter? Psyche 7 (2).score: 30.0
  43. Jared S. Moore (1933). The Problem of the Self. Philosophical Review 42 (5):487-499.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. A. W. Moore (1906). The Function of Thought. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (19):519-522.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jared S. Moore (1936). Some Neglected Alternatives to Pratt's Mind-Body Theory. Philosophical Review 45 (6):609-611.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jared S. Moore (1923). A Defense of the Foundations of Psychology. Journal of Philosophy 20 (15):405-413.score: 30.0
  47. Jay Moore (1992). On Private Events and Theoretical Terms. Journal of Mind and Behavior 13 (4):329-345.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. G. E. Moore (1912). Free Will. In Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press. 244-260.score: 27.0
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Clayton Littlejohn (2010). Moore's Paradox and Epistemic Norms. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):79 – 100.score: 24.0
    We shall evaluate two strategies for motivating the view that knowledge is the norm of belief. The first draws on observations concerning belief's aim and the parallels between belief and assertion. The second appeals to observations concerning Moore's Paradox. Neither of these strategies gives us good reason to accept the knowledge account. The considerations offered in support of this account motivate only the weaker account on which truth is the fundamental norm of belief.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000