14 found
Sort by:
  1. Douglas W. McLaughlin & Cesar R. Torres (forthcoming). A Veil of Separation in Advance. International Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Cesar R. Torres (forthcoming). The Role of Teamwork in Organized Youth Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-7.
    Paul Gaffney has provided an excellent exploration of teamwork in athletic contexts, a topic that in spite of its prominence and relevance in the sporting world has been relatively neglected in the philosophy of sport literature. In this paper, I present and discuss three areas of Gaffney’s exploration of teamwork relevant to organized youth sport that might help stimulate reflection on the most auspicious conditions and responsible methodologies for young athletes to become themselves through organized sport.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Cesar R. Torres (2012). Expatriate Coaching, Olympism and the Olympic Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (2):289-304.
    The practice of hiring foreign coaches to lead national teams has been on the rise and is especially visible at the Olympic Games. It has been criticised in both the receiving and the lending countries as a breach of patriotic duty. In a recent publication I defended expatriate coaching as a morally unobjectionable practice with many beneficial effects. In this article, I extend my defence of expatriate coaching into the realm of the Olympic Games. I argue that when articulated from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Cesar R. Torres (2012). Furthering Interpretivism's Integrity: Bringing Together Ethics and Aesthetics. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (2):299-319.
    One important limitation of the current renditions of interpretivism is that its emphasis on the moral dimension of sport has overlooked the aesthetic dimension lying at the core of this account of sport. The interpretivist?s failure to acknowledge and consider the aesthetic implicitly distances this realm from the moral. Marcia Muelder Eaton calls this distancing the separatist mistake. This paper argues that interpretivism presupposes not only moral but also aesthetic principles and values. What it sets out to demonstrate is that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Cesar R. Torres, Jan Boxill, W. Miller Brown, Michael Burke, Nicholas Dixon, Randolf Feezell, Leslie Francis, Jeffrey Fry, Paul L. Gaffney & Mark Holowchak (2012). Associate Editor and Book Review Editor. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Cesar R. Torres & Douglas W. McLaughlin (2012). Indigestion?: An Apology for Ties. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):144-158.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Douglas W. McLaughlin & Cesar R. Torres (2011). Sweet Tension and its Phenomenological Description: Sport, Intersubjectivity and Horizon. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (3):270 - 284.
    In this paper, we argue that a rich phenomenological description of ?sweet tension? is an important step to understanding how and why sport is a meaningful human endeavour. We introduce the phenomenological concepts of intersubjectivity and horizon and elaborate how they inform the study and understanding of human experience. In the process, we establish that intersubjectivity is always embodied, developing and ethically committed. Likewise, we establish that our horizons are experienced from an embodied, developing and ethically committed perspective that serves (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. César R. Torres (2011). Los goles con la mano: ¿deben o no ser considerados como parte del juego? Dilemata 5:21-43.
    This paper evaluates the role of hand goals in football and analyzes what should be considered part of the game. First, the arguments most frequently used to defend hand goals are presented and analyzed. Then, these arguments are evaluated from an interpretivist theory of competitive sport understood as a social practice. This evaluation demonstrates the invalidity of the arguments in support of hand goals.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Cesar R. Torres & Peter F. Hager (2011). The Desirability of the Season Long Tournament: A Response to Finn. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (1):39-54.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Cesar R. Torres & Daniel G. Campos (2010). Philosophy of Sport in Latin America. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):292-309.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Cesar R. Torres (2009). What Is Wrong With Playing High? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (1):1-21.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Cesar R. Torres & Peter F. Hager (2007). De-Emphasizing Competition in Organized Youth Sport: Misdirected Reforms and Misled Children. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):194-210.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Cesar R. Torres & Peter F. Hager (2005). Competitive Sport, Evaluation Systems, and Just Results: The Case of Rugby Union's Bonus-Point System. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (2):208-222.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Cesar R. Torres (2000). What Counts As Part of a Game? A Look at Skills. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):81-92.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation